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Cholesterol

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Name Cholesterol EINECS 200-353-2
CAS No. 57-88-5 Density 0.988 g/cm3
Solubility 0.002 mg/mL in water Melting Point 148-150 °C
Formula C27H46O Boiling Point 480.648 °C at 760 mmHg
Molecular Weight 386.66 Flash Point 209.291 °C
Transport Information UN 1170 3/PG 3 Appearance White to faintly yellow cryst. powder
Safety 24/25-22-36/37-36-26 Risk Codes 10-48/20/22-40-38-22-36/37/38
Molecular Structure Molecular Structure of 57-88-5 (Cholest-5-en-3-ol(3b)-) Hazard Symbols HarmfulXn, IrritantXi
Synonyms

Cholesterol(8CI);5:6-Cholesten-3b-ol;Cholest-5-en-3b-ol;Cholesterin;Cholesteryl alcohol;Dythol;Lidinit;Lidinite;NSC 8798;Provitamin D;D5-Cholesten-3b-ol;

 

Chemistry


IUPAC Name: (3S,8S,9S,10R,13R,14S,17R)-10,13-Dimethyl-17-[(2R)-6-methylheptan-2-yl]-2,3,4,7,8,9,11,12,14,15,16,17-dodecahydro-1H-cyclopenta[a]phenanthren-3-ol
Empirical Formula: C27H46O
Molecular Weight: 386.6535
EINECS: 200-353-2
Classification Code: Mutation data; Natural Product; Pharmaceutic aid [emulsifying agent]; Reproductive Effect; Tumor data
Melting Point: 148-150 °C
alpha: -36 °(c=2, dioxane)
storage temp.: 2-8 °C
solubility: H2O: 0.002 mg/mL
Water Solubility: negligible
Index of Refraction: 1.525
Molar Refractivity: 119.97 cm3
Molar Volume: 391.4 cm3
Surface Tension: 38.1 dyne/cm
Density: 0.98 g/cm3
Flash Point: 209.3 °C
Enthalpy of Vaporization: 85.88 kJ/mol
Boiling Point: 480.6 °C at 760 mmHg
Vapour Pressure of (CAS NO.57-88-5): 2.95E-11 mmHg at 25 °C

History

The name Cholesterol originates from the Greek chole- and stereos, and the chemical suffix -ol for an alcohol, as Francois Poulletier de la Salle first identified cholesterol in solid form in gallstones, in 1769. However, it was only in 1815 that chemist Eugène Chevreul named the compound "cholesterine".

Uses

 Cholesterol (CAS NO.57-88-5) is used as pharmaceutic aid. It is an essential structural component of mammalian cell membranes, where it is required to establish proper membrane permeability and fluidity. In addition, cholesterol is an important component for the manufacture of bile acids, steroid hormones, and fat-soluble vitamins including Vitamin A, Vitamin D, Vitamin E, and Vitamin K. Cholesterol is the principal sterol synthesized by animals, but small quantities are synthesized in other eukaryotes, such as plants and fungi. It is almost completely absent among prokaryotes, which include bacteria.

Safety Profile

Hazard Codes : HarmfulXn,IrritantXii
Risk Statements : 10-48/20/22-40-38-22-36/37/38 
R10:Flammable. 
R48:Danger of serious damage to health by prolonged exposure. 
R20/22:Harmful by inhalation and if swallowed. 
R40:Limited evidence of a carcinogenic effect. 
R38:Irritating to skin. 
R22:Harmful if swallowed. 
R36/37/38:Irritating to eyes, respiratory system and skin.
Safety Statements : 24/25-22-36/37-36-26 
S24/25:Avoid contact with skin and eyes. 
S22:Do not breathe dust. 
S36/37:Wear suitable protective clothing and gloves. 
S36:Wear suitable protective clothing. 
S26: In case of contact with eyes, rinse immediately with plenty of water and seek medical advice.
RIDADR : UN 1170 3/PG 3
WGK Germany : 1
RTECS : FZ8400000

Specification

 Cholesterol (CAS NO.57-88-5), its Synonyms are 3-beta-Hydroxycholest-5-ene ; 3beta-Hydroxycholest-5-ene ; 5:6-Cholesten-3beta-ol ; AI3-03112 ; CCRIS 2834 ; Cholest-5-en-3-beta-ol ; Cholest-5-en-3-ol, (3beta)- ; Cholest-5-en-3beta-ol ; Cholesterin ; Cholesterine ; Cholesterol ; Cholesterol base H ; Cholesteryl alcohol ; Cholestrin ; Cholestrol ; Cordulan ; Dusoline ; Dusoran ; Dythol . It is white to faintly yellow cryst. powder. Cholesterol is a lipidic, waxy steroid found in the cell membranes and transported in the blood plasma of all animals. It is an essential component of mammalian cell membranes where it is required to establish proper membrane permeability and fluidity.

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