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Cas Database

110-91-8

110-91-8

Identification

  • Product Name:Morpholine

  • CAS Number: 110-91-8

  • EINECS:203-815-1

  • Molecular Weight:87.1216

  • Molecular Formula: C4H9NO

  • HS Code:2934.90

  • Mol File:110-91-8.mol

Synonyms:Diethylenimide oxide;Drewamine;BASF 238;1-Oxa-4-azacyclohexane;Tetrahydro-2H-1,4-oxazine;Morpholine (4-oxazine);Tetrahydro-p-oxazine;Diethyleneimide oxide;Diethylene oximide;Tetrahydro-1,4-oxazine;2H-1,4-Oxazine, tetrahydro-;Morpholine hydrochloride;p-Isoxazine, tetrahydro-;Diethylene imidoxide;Tetrahydro-1, 4-isoxazine;1-oxa-4-azoniacyclohexane;4H-1,4-Oxazine, tetrahydro-;

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Safety information and MSDS view more

  • Pictogram(s):CorrosiveC

  • Hazard Codes: C:Corrosive;

  • Signal Word:Danger

  • Hazard Statement:H226 Flammable liquid and vapourH302 Harmful if swallowed H312 Harmful in contact with skin H314 Causes severe skin burns and eye damage H332 Harmful if inhaled

  • First-aid measures: General adviceConsult a physician. Show this safety data sheet to the doctor in attendance.If inhaled Fresh air, rest. Half-upright position. Artificial respiration may be needed. Refer for medical attention. See Notes. In case of skin contact Remove contaminated clothes. Rinse skin with plenty of water or shower. Refer for medical attention . In case of eye contact First rinse with plenty of water for several minutes (remove contact lenses if easily possible), then refer for medical attention. If swallowed Rinse mouth. Give one or two glasses of water to drink. Do NOT induce vomiting. Refer for medical attention . VAPOR: Irritating to eyes, nose and throat. If inhaled, will cause nausea, headache, or difficult breathing. LIQUID: Irritating to skin and eyes. (USCG, 1999) Immediate first aid: Ensure that adequate decontamination has been carried out. If patient is not breathing, start artificial respiration, preferably with a demand valve resuscitator, bag-valve-mask device, or pocket mask, as trained. Perform CPR if necessary. Immediately flush contaminated eyes with gently flowing water. Do not induce vomiting. If vomiting occurs, lean patient forward or place on the left side (head-down position, if possible) to maintain an open airway and prevent aspiration. Keep patient quiet and maintain normal body temperature. Obtain medical attention. /Organic bases/Amines and related compounds/

  • Fire-fighting measures: Suitable extinguishing media Use dry chemical, carbon dioxide, or alcohol foam extinguishers. Vapors are heavier than air and will collect in low areas. Vapors may travel long distances to ignition sources and flashback. Vapors in confined areas may explode when exposed to fire. Containers may explode in fire. Storage containers and parts of containers may rocket great distances, in many directions. If material or contaminated runoff enters waterways, notify downstream users of potentially contaminated waters. Notify local health and fire officials and pollution control agencies. From a secure, explosion-proof location, use water spray to cool exposed containers. If cooling streams are ineffective (venting sound increases in volume and pitch, tank discolors or shows any signs of deforming), withdraw immediately to a secure position ... The only respirators recommended for fire fighting are self-contained breathing apparatuses that have full facepieces and are operated in a pressure-demand or other positive-pressure mode. FLAMMABLE. Flashback along vapor trail may occur. Vapor may explode if ignited in an enclosed area. Irritating vapors are generated when heated. Vapor is heavier than air and may travel some distance to source of ignition and flash back. (USCG, 1999) Wear self-contained breathing apparatus for firefighting if necessary.

  • Accidental release measures: Use personal protective equipment. Avoid dust formation. Avoid breathing vapours, mist or gas. Ensure adequate ventilation. Evacuate personnel to safe areas. Avoid breathing dust. For personal protection see section 8. Personal protection: complete protective clothing including self-contained breathing apparatus. Collect leaking and spilled liquid in sealable containers as far as possible. Absorb remaining liquid in sand or inert absorbent. Then store and dispose of according to local regulations. Spill handling: evacuate and restrict persons not wearing protective equipment from area of spill or leak until cleanup is complete. Remove all ignition sources. Establish forced ventilation to keep levels below explosive limit. Absorb liquids in vermiculite, dry sand, earth, peat, carbon, or a similar material and deposit in sealed containers. Keep this chemical out of a confined space, such as a sewer, because of the possibility of an explosion, unless the sewer is designed to prevent the build-up of explosive concentrations. It may be necessary to contain and dispose of this chemical as a hazardous waste. If material or contaminated runoff enters waterways, notify downstream users of potentially contaminated waters. Contact your Department of Environmental Protection or your regional office of the federal EPA for specific recommendations.

  • Handling and storage: Avoid contact with skin and eyes. Avoid formation of dust and aerosols. Avoid exposure - obtain special instructions before use.Provide appropriate exhaust ventilation at places where dust is formed. For precautions see section 2.2. Fireproof. Separated from strong oxidants and acids. Dry.Before entering confined space where this chemical may be present, check to make sure that an explosive concentration does not exist. Morpholine must be stored to avoid contact with strong acids, such as nitric acid, and strong oxidizers, such as chlorine dioxide, bromine, nitrates, and permanganates, since violent reactions occur.

  • Exposure controls/personal protection:Occupational Exposure limit valuesRecommended Exposure Limit: 10 Hr Time-Weighted Avg: 20 ppm (70 mg/cu m); skin.Recommended Exposure Limit: 15 Min Short-Term Exposure Limit: 30 ppm (105 mg/cu m), skin.Biological limit values Handle in accordance with good industrial hygiene and safety practice. Wash hands before breaks and at the end of workday. Eye/face protection Safety glasses with side-shields conforming to EN166. Use equipment for eye protection tested and approved under appropriate government standards such as NIOSH (US) or EN 166(EU). Skin protection Wear impervious clothing. The type of protective equipment must be selected according to the concentration and amount of the dangerous substance at the specific workplace. Handle with gloves. Gloves must be inspected prior to use. Use proper glove removal technique(without touching glove's outer surface) to avoid skin contact with this product. Dispose of contaminated gloves after use in accordance with applicable laws and good laboratory practices. Wash and dry hands. The selected protective gloves have to satisfy the specifications of EU Directive 89/686/EEC and the standard EN 374 derived from it. Respiratory protection Wear dust mask when handling large quantities. Thermal hazards

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Relevant articles and documentsAll total 265 Articles be found

Selective electrochemical deprotection of cinnamyl ethers, esters, and carbamates

Hansen, Jeff,Freeman, Stanley,Hudlicky, Tomas

, p. 1575 - 1578 (2003)

Electrochemical deprotection of the cinnamyl moiety from ethers, esters, and carbamates was studied with the focus on O- versus N- selectivity as well as selectivity over allyl or benzyl systems.

EXAMINATION OF HIGH-LOADED NICKEL CATALYSTS BY IR SPECTROSCOPY: EFFECT OF THE SUPPORT AND Pd ON SURFACE PROPERTIES

Jiratova, Kveta,Moravkova, Lenka,Snajdaufova, Hana,Paukshtis, Evgenii A.

, p. 2575 - 2582 (1992)

Activation of the ammonia molecule and subsequent adsorption of the NH2 fragment on the surface of the NiO + Pd/TiO2 catalysts, in contrast to NiO + PdSiO2 catalysts, was demonstrated by IR spectroscopy.The decrease in the NiO + Pd/TiO2 catalyst acidity was manifested in the higher catalyst stability in reductive amination of diethylene glycol to morpholine.

-

Erickson,Sander

, p. 2086,2088 (1972)

-

Manganese-Catalyzed Sequential Hydrogenation of CO2 to Methanol via Formamide

Kar, Sayan,Goeppert, Alain,Kothandaraman, Jotheeswari,Prakash, G. K. Surya

, p. 6347 - 6351 (2017)

Mn(I)-PNP pincer catalyzed sequential one-pot homogeneous CO2 hydrogenation to CH3OH by molecular H2 is demonstrated. The hydrogenation consists of two parts - N-formylation of an amine utilizing CO2 and H2, and subsequent formamide reduction to CH3OH, regenerating the amine in the process. A reported air-stable and well-defined Mn-PNP pincer complex was found active for the catalysis of both steps. CH3OH yields up to 84% and 71% (w.r.t amine) were obtained, when benzylamine and morpholine were used as amines, respectively; and a TON of up to 36 was observed. In our opinion, this study represents an important development in the nascent field of base-metal-catalyzed homogeneous CO2 hydrogenation to CH3OH.

Experimental investigations of thermal stability of some morpholinecarbamic acid complexes of copper(II) and zinc(II)

Kalia, Shashi B.,Kumar, Rajesh,Bharti, Monika,Christopher

, p. 1291 - 1306 (2017)

Some new carbamates, viz. M(MorphcbmH)2X2 (MorphcbmH?=?morpholinecarbamic acid, M?=?Cu, X?=?Cl, ClO4,NO3; M?=?Zn, X?=?Cl, ClO4, NO3, CH3COO and X2?=?SO4), h

On-resin N-terminal peptoid degradation: Toward mild sequencing conditions

Proulx, Caroline,No?, Falko,Yoo, Stan,Connolly, Michael D.,Zuckermann, Ronald N.

, p. 726 - 736 (2016)

A novel approach to sequentially degrade peptoid N-terminal N-(substituted)glycine residues on the solid-phase using very mild conditions is reported. This method relies on the treatment of resin-bound, bromoacetylated peptoids with silver perchlorate in THF, leading to an intramolecular cyclization reaction to liberate the terminal residue as a N-substituted morpholine-2,5-dione, resulting in a truncated peptoid upon hydrolysis and a silver bromide byproduct. Side-chain functional group tolerance is explored and reaction kinetics are determined. In a series of pentapeptoids possessing variable, non-nucleophilic side-chains at the second position (R2), we demonstrate that sequential N-terminal degradation of the first two residues proceeds in 87% and 74% conversions on average, respectively. We further demonstrate that the degradation reaction is selective for peptoids, and represents substantial progress toward a mild, iterative sequencing method for peptoid oligomers.

Kinetics and mechanism of large rate enhancement in an acidic aqueous cleavage of the tertiary amide bond of N-(2-methoxyphenyl)-N′-morpholinophthalamide (1)

Sim, Yoke-Leng,Ariffin, Azhar,Khan, M. Niyaz

, p. 178 - 182 (2008)

The rate of conversion of 1 to N-(2-methoxyphenyl)phthalimide (2) within [HCl] range 5.0 × 10-3-1.0 M at 1.0 M ionic strength (by NaCl) reveals the presence of both uncatalyzed and specific acid-catalyzed kinetic terms in the rate law. Intramolecular carboxamide group-assisted cleavage of amide bond of 1 reveals rate enhancement of much larger than 106-fold compared to the expected rate of analogous intermolecular reaction.

-

Kice,Rogers

, p. 225 (1976)

-

-

Hampton,Pollard

, p. 2338 (1936)

-

Autocatalytic decomposition of N-methylmorpholine N-oxide induced by Mannich intermediates

Rosenau, Thomas,Potthast, Antje,Kosma, Paul,Chen, Chen-Loung,Gratzl, Josef S.

, p. 2166 - 2167 (1999)

-

Cooperative reactivity in photogenerated radical ion pairs: Photofragmentation of amino ketones

Bergmark, William R.,Whitten, David G.

, p. 4042 - 4043 (1990)

-

New Allyl Group Acceptors for Palladium Catalyzed Removal of Allylic Protections and Transacylation of Allyl Carbamates.

Dessolin, Michele,Guillerez, Marie-George,Thieriet, Nathalie,Guibe, Francois,Loffet, Albert

, p. 5741 - 5744 (1995)

Key words: allylic protecting groups, palladium catalysis, transacylation, phenyltrihydrosilane, N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide.Allyl carboxylates, carbamates and phenoxides may be cleaved or transacylated in the presence of palladium catalyst and either phenyltrihydridosilane or N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide.These reactions are totally compatible with the presence of Boc and, as far as phenyltrihydrosilane is concerned, Fmoc protections.

Infrared studies of amine, pyridine, and phosphine derivatives of tungsten hexacarbonyl

Angelici, Robert J.,Malone, Mary Diana

, p. 1731 - 1736 (1967)

Seventeen complexes, LW(CO)5, where L = amine, pyridine, or phosphine, have been prepared and examined in the C-O stretching region of their infrared spectra. The C-O stretching frequencies and force constants in the amine, pyridine, and phosphine series decrease as the basicity of L increases, and the magnitude of this decrease is virtually the same for all three groups of ligands. The results suggest that W-L π bonding, even for the phosphines, need not be invoked to explain the C-O stretching frequency shifts in these metal carbonyl complexes.

Thermodynamics and equilibrium solubility of carbon dioxide in diglycolamine/morpholine/water

Al-Juaied, Mohammed,Rochelle, Gary T.

, p. 708 - 717 (2006)

Carbon dioxide solubility was studied in 3.5 m (23.5 wt %) morpholine (MOR), 17.7 m (65 wt %) 2-aminoethoxyethanol (diglycolamine or DGA), and 3.6 m MOR + 14.7 m DCA (11 wt % MOR + 53 wt % DGA). CO2 solubility was determined by dynamic measurements with a wetted wall contactor. Carbamate and bicarbonate concentrations were determined by 13C NMR in solutions loaded with 13CO2. The data are represented by the electrolyte NRTL model. At a given CO2 loading (mol/mol amine), the CO2 vapor pressure over 3.5 m MOR is 10 to 1000 times greater than 17.7 m DGA. In 3.6 m MOR + 14.7 m DGA, the CO2 vapor pressure is 5 to 7 times greater than in 17.7 m DGA at high CO2 loading, but the same below 0.2 loading. MOR carbamate is less stable than DGA carbamate by a factor of 7 to 10 from (300 to 333) K. The model predicts that MOR vapor pressure is 100 times greater than DGA over 3.6 m MOR + 14.7 m DGA from (313 to 333) K. The heat of CO2 absorption in the blend is equivalent to 17.7 m DGA up to 0.35 loading but is 40 % lower at 0.5 loading. The working capacity of the blend is 17 % less than 17.7 m DGA.

The pyridoxamine action on Amadori compounds: A reexamination of its scavenging capacity and chelating effect

Adrover, Miquel,Vilanova, Bartolome,Frau, Juan,Munoz, Francisco,Donoso, Josefa

, p. 5557 - 5569 (2008)

Amadori compounds act as precursors in the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) by non-enzymatic protein glycation, which are involved in ensuing protein damage. Pyridoxamine is a potent drug against protein glycation, and can act on several pathways in the glycation process. Nevertheless, the pyridoxamine inhibition action on Amadori compounds oxidation is still unclear. In this work, we have studied the Schiff base formation between pyridoxamine and various Amadori models at pH 7.4 at 37 °C in the presence of NaCNBH3. We detected an adduct formation, which suggests that pyridoxamine reacts with the carbonyl group in Amadori compounds. The significance of this mechanism is tested by comparison of the obtained kinetics rate constants with that obtained for 4-(aminomethyl)-pyridine, a structural analogue of pyridoxamine without post-Amadori action. We also study the chelating effect of pyridoxamine on metal ions. We have determined the complexation equilibrium constants between pyridoxamine, N-(1-deoxy-d-fructos-1-yl)-l-tryptophan, aminoguanidine, and ascorbic acid in the presence of Zn2+. The results show that the strong stability of pyridoxamine complexes is the key in its post-Amadori inhibition action. On the other hand results explain the lack of inhibition of aminoguanidine (a glycation inhibitor) in the post-Amadori reactions.

REDUCTIVE AMINATION OF DIETHYLENE GLYCOL TO MORPHOLINE OVER SUPPORTED NICKEL CATALYSTS: ZEOLITES AS CATALYST ADMIXTURES

Jiratova, Kveta,Snajdaufova, Hana,Moravkova, Lenka,Kubelkova, Ludmila

, p. 901 - 908 (1992)

The effect of HZSM-5, H-silicalite and amorphous silica admixtures on the surface properties of nickel catalysts as well as on their activities, selectivities and stabilities in the reductive amination of diethylene glycol was studied.It was found that, in comparison with amorphous silica, zeolites do not positively affect the catalytic properties of nickel catalysts.In addition, the acidity of the zeolites, the dispersity of the nickel phase, changes in the chemical composition during the reaction and adsorption of the reaction components or intermediates on the surface and consequent blocking of the zeolite surface played a role.

A Lewis Base Nucleofugality Parameter, NFB, and Its Application in an Analysis of MIDA-Boronate Hydrolysis Kinetics

García-Domínguez, Andrés,Gonzalez, Jorge A.,Leach, Andrew G.,Lloyd-Jones, Guy C.,Nichol, Gary S.,Taylor, Nicholas P.

supporting information, (2022/01/04)

The kinetics of quinuclidine displacement of BH3 from a wide range of Lewis base borane adducts have been measured. Parameterization of these rates has enabled the development of a nucleofugality scale (NFB), shown to quantify and predict the leaving group ability of a range of other Lewis bases. Additivity observed across a number of series R′3-nRnX (X = P, N; R′ = aryl, alkyl) has allowed the formulation of related substituent parameters (nfPB, nfAB), providing a means of calculating NFB values for a range of Lewis bases that extends far beyond those experimentally derived. The utility of the nucleofugality parameter is explored by the correlation of the substituent parameter nfPB with the hydrolyses rates of a series of alkyl and aryl MIDA boronates under neutral conditions. This has allowed the identification of MIDA boronates with heteroatoms proximal to the reacting center, showing unusual kinetic lability or stability to hydrolysis.

The benzyl can be selectively removed by visible light or near visible light. Method for protecting allyl and propargyl group

-

Paragraph 0024, (2021/10/16)

The invention provides a method for selectively removing benzyl, allyl and propargyl protecting groups by visible light or near visible light, namely a substrate containing benzyl, allyl or propargyl protecting groups. The method has the advantages of simple operation, safe and clean visible light or near visible light as excitation conditions, cheap and easily available reagents, high reaction yield, high reaction chemistry and regional selectivity, and is suitable for selective removal of benzyl, allyl and propargyl protecting groups in various substrates.

Platinum-Triggered Bond-Cleavage of Pentynoyl Amide and N-Propargyl Handles for Drug-Activation

Oliveira, Bruno L.,Stenton, Benjamin J.,Unnikrishnan,De Almeida, Cátia Rebelo,Conde, Jo?o,Negr?o, Magda,Schneider, Felipe S.S.,Cordeiro, Carlos,Ferreira, Miguel Godinho,Caramori, Giovanni F.,Domingos, Josiel B.,Fior, Rita,Bernardes, Gon?alo J. L.

supporting information, p. 10869 - 10880 (2020/07/04)

The ability to create ways to control drug activation at specific tissues while sparing healthy tissues remains a major challenge. The administration of exogenous target-specific triggers offers the potential for traceless release of active drugs on tumor sites from antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) and caged prodrugs. We have developed a metal-mediated bond-cleavage reaction that uses platinum complexes [K2PtCl4 or Cisplatin (CisPt)] for drug activation. Key to the success of the reaction is a water-promoted activation process that triggers the reactivity of the platinum complexes. Under these conditions, the decaging of pentynoyl tertiary amides and N-propargyls occurs rapidly in aqueous systems. In cells, the protected analogues of cytotoxic drugs 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE) are partially activated by nontoxic amounts of platinum salts. Additionally, a noninternalizing ADC built with a pentynoyl traceless linker that features a tertiary amide protected MMAE was also decaged in the presence of platinum salts for extracellular drug release in cancer cells. Finally, CisPt-mediated prodrug activation of a propargyl derivative of 5-FU was shown in a colorectal zebrafish xenograft model that led to significant reductions in tumor size. Overall, our results reveal a new metal-based cleavable reaction that expands the application of platinum complexes beyond those in catalysis and cancer therapy.

Catalytic Hydrogenation of Thioesters, Thiocarbamates, and Thioamides

Luo, Jie,Rauch, Michael,Avram, Liat,Ben-David, Yehoshoa,Milstein, David

supporting information, p. 21628 - 21633 (2021/01/11)

Direct hydrogenation of thioesters with H2 provides a facile and waste-free method to access alcohols and thiols. However, no report of this reaction is documented, possibly because of the incompatibility of the generated thiol with typical hydrogenation catalysts. Here, we report an efficient and selective hydrogenation of thioesters. The reaction is catalyzed by an acridine-based ruthenium complex without additives. Various thioesters were fully hydrogenated to the corresponding alcohols and thiols with excellent tolerance for amide, ester, and carboxylic acid groups. Thiocarbamates and thioamides also undergo hydrogenation under similar conditions, substantially extending the application of hydrogenation of organosulfur compounds.

Discovery and characterization of an acridine radical photoreductant

MacKenzie, Ian A.,Wang, Leifeng,Onuska, Nicholas P. R.,Williams, Olivia F.,Begam, Khadiza,Moran, Andrew M.,Dunietz, Barry D.,Nicewicz, David A.

, p. 76 - 80 (2020/04/17)

Photoinduced electron transfer (PET) is a phenomenon whereby the absorption of light by a chemical species provides an energetic driving force for an electron-transfer reaction1–4. This mechanism is relevant in many areas of chemistry, including the study of natural and artificial photosynthesis, photovoltaics and photosensitive materials. In recent years, research in the area of photoredox catalysis has enabled the use of PET for the catalytic generation of both neutral and charged organic free-radical species. These technologies have enabled previously inaccessible chemical transformations and have been widely used in both academic and industrial settings. Such reactions are often catalysed by visible-light-absorbing organic molecules or transition-metal complexes of ruthenium, iridium, chromium or copper5,6. Although various closed-shell organic molecules have been shown to behave as competent electron-transfer catalysts in photoredox reactions, there are only limited reports of PET reactions involving neutral organic radicals as excited-state donors or acceptors. This is unsurprising because the lifetimes of doublet excited states of neutral organic radicals are typically several orders of magnitude shorter than the singlet lifetimes of known transition-metal photoredox catalysts7–11. Here we document the discovery, characterization and reactivity of a neutral acridine radical with a maximum excited-state oxidation potential of ?3.36 volts versus a saturated calomel electrode, which is similarly reducing to elemental lithium, making this radical one of the most potent chemical reductants reported12. Spectroscopic, computational and chemical studies indicate that the formation of a twisted intramolecular charge-transfer species enables the population of higher-energy doublet excited states, leading to the observed potent photoreducing behaviour. We demonstrate that this catalytically generated PET catalyst facilitates several chemical reactions that typically require alkali metal reductants and can be used in other organic transformations that require dissolving metal reductants.

Process route upstream and downstream products

Process route

4-(trimethylsilyl)morpholine
13368-42-8

4-(trimethylsilyl)morpholine

chloro-trimethyl-silane
75-77-4

chloro-trimethyl-silane

4-cyclohexen-1-ylmorpholine
670-80-4

4-cyclohexen-1-ylmorpholine

Hexamethyldisiloxane
107-46-0

Hexamethyldisiloxane

1-(Trimethylsilyloxy)cyclohexene
6651-36-1

1-(Trimethylsilyloxy)cyclohexene

morpholin hydrochloride
10024-89-2

morpholin hydrochloride

Conditions
Conditions Yield
In diethyl ether; at -30 ℃; for 2h; Product distribution; other substrate, temperature and time;
Thiobenzmorpholid
2032-36-2

Thiobenzmorpholid

phenylmethanethiol
100-53-8

phenylmethanethiol

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With Hexanethiol; C28H41NOP2Ru; hydrogen; In 1,4-dioxane; at 150 ℃; for 36h; under 30003 Torr; chemoselective reaction; Autoclave;
83 %Spectr.
83 %Spectr.
4-benzoylmorpholine
1468-28-6

4-benzoylmorpholine

4-benzyl-morpholine
10316-00-4

4-benzyl-morpholine

benzyl alcohol
100-51-6,185532-71-2

benzyl alcohol

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With tris(2,4-pentanedionato)ruthenium(III); ytterbium(III) trifluoromethanesulfonate nonohydrate; hydrogen; [2-((diphenylphospino)methyl)-2-methyl-1,3-propanediyl]bis[diphenylphosphine]; In 1,4-dioxane; at 150 ℃; for 60h; under 3750.38 Torr; Autoclave;
53 %Chromat.
2-morpholin-4-yl-1,2-diphenyl-ethanol
93950-25-5

2-morpholin-4-yl-1,2-diphenyl-ethanol

benzaldehyde
100-52-7

benzaldehyde

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With thioindigo; In water; benzene; Product distribution; Mechanism; Irradiation; in the presence of air;
With oxygen; rose bengal; In water; benzene; Product distribution; Quantum yield; Mechanism; Irradiation; other amino alcohols, 1,2-diamines, and amino ketones; var. singlet oxygen sensitizers; oxidative fragmentation;
2-morpholino-1-phenylethanol
4432-34-2

2-morpholino-1-phenylethanol

benzaldehyde
100-52-7

benzaldehyde

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With oxygen; rose bengal; In water; benzene; Quantum yield; Irradiation; oxidative fragmentation;
erythro-1,2-diphenyl-(2-morpholino)ethanol
4176-70-9,4176-71-0,19640-34-7,19640-35-8,93950-25-5

erythro-1,2-diphenyl-(2-morpholino)ethanol

benzaldehyde
100-52-7

benzaldehyde

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With thioindigo; In benzene; Product distribution; Mechanism; Quantum yield; Irradiation; other solvents, other electron acceptors, deuterium isotope effect, solvent effect, quenching constant;
rac-2-morpholino-1,2-diphenylethan-1-ol
4176-70-9,4176-71-0,19640-34-7,19640-35-8,93950-25-5

rac-2-morpholino-1,2-diphenylethan-1-ol

benzaldehyde
100-52-7

benzaldehyde

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With thioindigo; In benzene; Product distribution; Mechanism; Quantum yield; Irradiation; other solvents, other electron acceptors, deuterium isotope effect, solvent effect, quenching constant;
meso-4,4'-(1,2-Diphenylethylen)bis<morpholin>
122687-97-2

meso-4,4'-(1,2-Diphenylethylen)bis

benzaldehyde
100-52-7

benzaldehyde

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With 2-carbomethoxy-9,10-anthraquinone; water; In dichloromethane; acetonitrile; Quantum yield; Irradiation; other singlet acceptors;
erythro 1,2-Diphenyl-2-morpholinoethanol
19640-35-8

erythro 1,2-Diphenyl-2-morpholinoethanol

benzaldehyde
100-52-7

benzaldehyde

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With {Ru(5,5'-(EtO2C)2-2,2'-bipyridine)3}{PF6}2; In acetonitrile; Quantum yield; Rate constant; Irradiation;
threo 1,2-Diphenyl-2-morpholinoethanol
19640-34-7

threo 1,2-Diphenyl-2-morpholinoethanol

benzaldehyde
100-52-7

benzaldehyde

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With {Ru(5,5'-(EtO2C)2-2,2'-bipyridine)3}{PF6}2; In acetonitrile; Quantum yield; Rate constant; Irradiation;

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