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Cas Database

463-58-1

463-58-1

Identification

Synonyms:Carbonylsulfide (8CI); Carbon monoxide monosulfide; Carbon oxide sulfide; Carbonoxysulfide; Carbon oxysulfide (COS); Carbonyl sulfide (COS); OCS; Oxycarbonsulfide (COS); Thiocarbonyl oxide

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Safety information and MSDS view more

  • Pictogram(s):Narcotic in high concentrations. Flammable, explosive limits in air 12–28.5%.

  • Hazard Codes:Narcotic in high concentrations. Flammable, explosive limits in air 12–28.5%.

  • Signal Word:Danger

  • Hazard Statement:H220 Extremely flammable gasH280 Contains gas under pressure; may explode if heated H331 Toxic if inhaled

  • First-aid measures: General adviceConsult a physician. Show this safety data sheet to the doctor in attendance.If inhaled If breathed in, move person into fresh air. If not breathing, give artificial respiration. Consult a physician. In case of skin contact Wash off with soap and plenty of water. Consult a physician. In case of eye contact Rinse thoroughly with plenty of water for at least 15 minutes and consult a physician. If swallowed Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious person. Rinse mouth with water. Consult a physician. Excerpt from ERG Guide 119 [Gases - Toxic - Flammable]: TOXIC; may be fatal if inhaled or absorbed through skin. Contact with gas or liquefied gas may cause burns, severe injury and/or frostbite. Fire will produce irritating, corrosive and/or toxic gases. Runoff from fire control may cause pollution. (ERG, 2016) Basic treatment: Establish a patent airway (oropharyngeal or nasopharyngeal airway, if needed). Suction if necessary. Watch for signs of respiratory insufficiency and assist ventilations if necessary. Administer oxygen by nonrebreather mask at 10 to 15 L/min. Monitor for pulmonary edema and treat if necessary ... Monitor for shock and treat if necessary ... Anticipate seizures and treat if necessary ... For eye contamination, flush eyes immediately with water. Irrigate each eye continuously with 0.9% saline (NS) during transport ... Treat with rapid rewarming techniques if frostbite occurs. /Hydrogen Sulfide and Related Compounds/

  • Fire-fighting measures: Suitable extinguishing media Evacuation: If fire becomes uncontrollable or container is exposed to direct flame consider evacuation of one-third mile radius. Excerpt from ERG Guide 119 [Gases - Toxic - Flammable]: Flammable; may be ignited by heat, sparks or flames. May form explosive mixtures with air. Those substances designated with a (P) may polymerize explosively when heated or involved in a fire. Vapors from liquefied gas are initially heavier than air and spread along ground. Vapors may travel to source of ignition and flash back. Some of these materials may react violently with water. Cylinders exposed to fire may vent and release toxic and flammable gas through pressure relief devices. Containers may explode when heated. Ruptured cylinders may rocket. Runoff may create fire or explosion hazard. (ERG, 2016) Wear self-contained breathing apparatus for firefighting if necessary.

  • Accidental release measures: Use personal protective equipment. Avoid dust formation. Avoid breathing vapours, mist or gas. Ensure adequate ventilation. Evacuate personnel to safe areas. Avoid breathing dust. For personal protection see section 8. Prevent further leakage or spillage if safe to do so. Do not let product enter drains. Discharge into the environment must be avoided. Cover with a weak solution of calcium hypochlorite (up to 15%). Transfer into a large breaker. After 12, hours, neutralize with 6M-hydrocloric acid or 6M-ammonium hydroxide, if necessary. Drain into sewer with abundant water.

  • Handling and storage: Avoid contact with skin and eyes. Avoid formation of dust and aerosols. Avoid exposure - obtain special instructions before use.Provide appropriate exhaust ventilation at places where dust is formed. For precautions see section 2.2. Store in cool place. Keep container tightly closed in a dry and well-ventilated place.

  • Exposure controls/personal protection:Occupational Exposure limit valuesBiological limit values Handle in accordance with good industrial hygiene and safety practice. Wash hands before breaks and at the end of workday. Eye/face protection Safety glasses with side-shields conforming to EN166. Use equipment for eye protection tested and approved under appropriate government standards such as NIOSH (US) or EN 166(EU). Skin protection Wear impervious clothing. The type of protective equipment must be selected according to the concentration and amount of the dangerous substance at the specific workplace. Handle with gloves. Gloves must be inspected prior to use. Use proper glove removal technique(without touching glove's outer surface) to avoid skin contact with this product. Dispose of contaminated gloves after use in accordance with applicable laws and good laboratory practices. Wash and dry hands. The selected protective gloves have to satisfy the specifications of EU Directive 89/686/EEC and the standard EN 374 derived from it. Respiratory protection Wear dust mask when handling large quantities. Thermal hazards

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Relevant articles and documentsAll total 80 Articles be found

-

Klemenc

, (1930)

-

Lavalley, J. C.,Travert, J.,Chevreau, T.,Lamotte, J.,Saur, O.

, (1979)

Isomers of HSCO: IR absorption spectra of t-HSCO in solid Ar.

Lo, Wen-Jui,Chen, Hui-Fen,Wu, Yu-Jong,Lee, Yuan-Pern

, p. 5717 - 5722 (2004)

Irradiation of an Ar matrix sample containing H2S and CO (or OCS) with an ArF excimer laser at 193 nm yields trans-HSCO (denoted t-HSCO). New lines at 1823.3, 931.6, and 553.3 cm(-1) appear after photolysis and their intensity enhances after annealing; secondary photolysis at 248 nm diminishes these lines and produces OCS and CO. These lines are assigned to C-O stretching, HSC-bending, and C-S stretching modes of t-HSCO, respectively, based on results of 13C-isotopic experiments and theoretical calculations. Theoretical calculations using density-functional theories (B3LYP and PW91PW91) predict four stable isomers of HSCO: t-HSCO, c-HSCO, HC(O)S, and c-HOCS, listed in increasing order of energy. According to calculations with B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ, t-HSCO is planar, with bond lengths of 1.34 A (H-S), 1.81 A (S-C), and 1.17 A (C-O), and angles angle HSC congruent with 93.4 degrees and angle SCO congruent with 128.3 degrees; it is more stable than c-HSCO and HC(O)S by approximately 9 kJ mol(-1) and more stable than c-HOCS by approximately 65 kJ mol(-1). Calculated vibrational wave numbers, IR intensities, and 13C-isotopic shifts for t-HSCO fit satisfactorily with experimental results. This new spectral identification of t-HSCO provides information for future investigations of its roles in atmospheric chemistry. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics

Carbonyl sulfide hydrolase from thiobacillus thioparus strain thi115 is one of the β-carbonic anhydrase family enzymes

Ogawa, Takahiro,Noguchi, Keiichi,Saito, Masahiko,Nagahata, Yoshiko,Kato, Hiromi,Ohtaki, Akashi,Nakayama, Hiroshi,Dohmae, Naoshi,Matsushita, Yasuhiko,Odaka, Masafumi,Yohda, Masafumi,Nyunoya, Hiroshi,Katayama, Yoko

, p. 3818 - 3825 (2013)

Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is an atmospheric trace gas leading to sulfate aerosol formation, thereby participating in the global radiation balance and ozone chemistry, but its biological sinks are not well understood. Thiobacillus thioparus strain THI115 can grow on thiocyanate (SCN-) as its sole energy source. Previously, we showed that SCN- is first converted to COS by thiocyanate hydrolase in T. thioparus strain THI115. In the present work, we purified, characterized, and determined the crystal structure of carbonyl sulfide hydrolase (COSase), which is responsible for the degradation of COS to H2S and CO2, the second step of SCN- assimilation. COSase is a homotetramer composed of a 23.4 kDa subunit containing a zinc ion in its catalytic site. The amino acid sequence of COSase is homologous to the β-class carbonic anhydrases (β-CAs). Although the crystal structure including the catalytic site resembles those of the β-CAs, CO2 hydration activity of COSase is negligible compared to those of the β-CAs. The α5 helix and the extra loop (Gly150-Pro158) near the N-terminus of the α6 helix narrow the substrate pathway, which could be responsible for the substrate specificity. The k cat/Km value, 9.6 × 105 s-1 M-1, is comparable to those of the β-CAs. COSase hydrolyzes COS over a wide concentration range, including the ambient level, in vitro and in vivo. COSase and its structurally related enzymes are distributed in the clade D in the phylogenetic tree of β-CAs, suggesting that COSase and its related enzymes are one of the catalysts responsible for the global sink of COS.

Rate Constant for the Reaction between OH and CS2 at 298 and 520 K

Leu, Ming-Taun,Smith, Roland H.

, p. 958 - 961 (1982)

In an attempt to resolve discrepancies between published values of the rate constant for the reaction between hydroxyl radical and carbon disulfide, the reaction has been studied in a discharge flow system by using resonance fluorescence for kinetic measurements and mass spectrometry for product analysis.On the basis of the measured rate constant for disappearance of OH and measurements of the amount of carbonyl sulfide formed, it was estimated that for the reaction HO + CS2 -> HS + OCS, k 3s-1 at 520 K and 3s-1 at 298 K, upper limits being specified because of the inability to isolate exclusively this reaction channel, and because of possible involvement of wall reactions.These results confirm the low values found for this rate constant in two very recent studies.

Selection of the type of methane conversion for catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide

Kasumova

, p. 196 - 201 (2012)

Catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide with converted gas obtained by various methods of conversion of natural gas was studied to select the most active reducing agent for SO2. Pleiades Publishing, Ltd., 2012.

Direct formation of Ge-C bonds from GeO2

Lewis, Larry N.,Litz, Kyle E.,Anostario, Joseph M.

, p. 11718 - 11722 (2002)

Germanium dioxide in the presence of 5% KOH reacted with dimethyl carbonate (DMC) at 250 °C to give (MeO)4Ge. The reaction of GeO2 and DMC is similar to that reported for SiO2; however, the rate of reaction for germanium is much higher than that of the corresponding silicon reaction. In a side-by-side experiment using SiO2 and GeO2 where the surface area of the silicon dioxide was 2 orders of magnitude higher than that of the GeO2, the base-catalyzed reaction with DMC was about an order of magnitude higher for the germanium dioxide. When GeO2 and 5% KOH were reacted with DMC at 350 °C, two products formed: (MeO)4Ge (70%) and MeGe(OMe)3 (30%). Confirmation of the identity of MeGe(OMe)3 was by GCMS, 1H and 13C NMR, and comparison to an authentic sample made by reaction of MeGeCl3 with NaOMe. Experiments to determine the mechanism of the direct formation of Ge-C from GeO2 ruled out participation from CO, H2, or carbon. The KOH-catalyzed reaction of other metal oxides was explored including B2O3, Ga2O3, TiO2, Sb2O3, SnO2, and SnO. Boron reacted to give unknown volatile products. Antimony reacted to give a solid which analyzed as Sb(OMe)3. SnO reacted with DMC to give a mixture that included (MeO)4Sn and possibly Me3Sn(OMe).

Khalafalla, S. E.,Haas, L. A.

, p. 121 - 129 (1972)

Synthesis and reactivity of a nickel(ii) thioperoxide complex: Demonstration of sulfide-mediated N2O reduction

Hartmann, Nathaniel J.,Wu, Guang,Hayton, Trevor W.

, p. 6580 - 6588 (2018)

The thiohyponitrite ([SNNO]2-) complex, [K(18-crown-6)][LtBuNiII(κ2-SNNO)] (LtBu = {(2,6-iPr2C6H3)NC(tBu)}2CH), extrudes N2 under mild heating to yield [K(18-crown-6)][LtBuNiII(η2-SO)] (1), along with minor products [K(18-crown-6)][LtBuNiII(η2-OSSO)] (2) and [K(18-crown-6)][LtBuNiII(η2-S2)] (3). Subsequent reaction of 1 with carbon monoxide (CO) results in the formation of [K(18-crown-6)][LtBuNiII(η2-SCO)] (4), [K(18-crown-6)][LtBuNiII(S,O:κ2-SCO2)] (5), [K(18-crown-6)][LtBuNiII(κ2-CO3)] (6), carbonyl sulfide (COS) (7), and [K(18-crown-6)][LtBuNiII(S2CO)] (8). To rationalize the formation of these products we propose that 1 first reacts with CO to form [K(18-crown-6)][LtBuNiII(S)] (I) and CO2, via O-atom abstraction. Subsequently, complex I reacts with CO or CO2 to form 4 and 5, respectively. Similarly, the formation of complex 6 and COS can be rationalized by the reaction of 1 with CO2 to form a putative Ni(ii) monothiopercarbonate, [K(18-crown-6)][LtBuNiII(κ2-SOCO2)] (11). The Ni(ii) monothiopercarbonate subsequently transfers a S-atom to CO to form COS and [K(18-crown-6)][LtBuNiII(κ2-CO3)] (6). Finally, the formation of 8 can be rationalized by the reaction of COS with I. Critically, the observation of complexes 4 and 5 in the reaction mixture reveals the stepwise conversion of [K(18-crown-6)][LtBuNiII(κ2-SNNO)] to 1 and then I, which represents the formal reduction of N2O by CO.

Hydrogen Sulfide Induced Carbon Dioxide Activation by Metal-Free Dual Catalysis

Kumar, Manoj,Francisco, Joseph S.

, p. 4359 - 4363 (2016)

The role of metal free dual catalysis in the hydrogen sulfide (H2S)-induced activation of carbon dioxide (CO2) and subsequent decomposition of resulting monothiolcarbonic acid in the gas phase has been explored. The results suggest that substituted amines and monocarboxylic type organic or inorganic acids via dual activation mechanisms promote both activation and decomposition reactions, implying that the judicious selection of a dual catalyst is crucial to the efficient C-S bond formation via CO2 activation. Considering that our results also suggest a new mechanism for the formation of carbonyl sulfide from CO2 and H2S, these new insights may help in better understanding the coupling between the carbon and sulfur cycles in the atmospheres of Earth and Venus. It's a gas, gas, gas: The role of metal-free dual catalysis in the hydrogen sulfide-induced activation of carbon dioxide has been explored by means of quantum chemical calculations. These results suggest a new mechanism for the formation of carbonyl sulphide in the atmospheres of Earth and Venus.

Mechanistic aspects of ketene formation deduced from femtosecond photolysis of diazocyclohexadienone, o-phenylene thioxocarbonate, and 2-chlorophenol

Burdzinski, Gotard,Kubicki, Jacek,Sliwa, Michel,Réhault, Julien,Zhang, Yunlong,Vyas, Shubham,Luk, Hoi Ling,Hadad, Christopher M.,Platz, Matthew S.

, p. 2026 - 2032 (2013)

The photochemistry of diazocyclohexadienone (1), o-phenylene thioxocarbonate (2), and 2-chlorophenol (3) in solution was studied using time-resolved UV-vis and IR transient absorption spectroscopies. In these three cases, the same product cyclopentadienyl ketene (5) is formed, and two different mechanistic pathways leading to this product are discussed: (a) rearrangement in the excited state (RIES) and (b) a stepwise route involving the intermediacy of vibrationally excited or relaxed carbene. Femtosecond UV-vis detection allows observation of an absorption band assigned to singlet 2-oxocyclohexa-3,5- dienylidene (4), and this absorption feature decays with an ~30 ps time constant in hexane and acetonitrile. The excess vibrational energy present in nascent carbenes results in the ultrafast Wolff rearrangement of the hot species. IR detection shows that photoexcited o-phenylene thioxocarbonate (2) and 2-chlorophenol (3) efficiently form the carbene species while diazocyclohexadienone (1) photochemistry proceeds mainly by a concerted process.

Degradation of an acetylene terminated sulfone (ATS) resin I. In an oxygen free environment

Stevenson,Goldfarb

, p. 2643 - 2665 (1990)

A study of the rates and mechanisms of degradation of an acetylene terminated sulfone resin, more precisely, bis[4-(3-ethynyl phenoxy) phenyl] sulfone and its higher oligomers, under high vacuum conditions, and under a flowing atmosphere of nitrogen, was

Flueckiger

, p. 214 (1871)

Progress toward colorimetric and fluorescent detection of carbonyl sulfide

Cerda, Matthew M.,Fehr, Julia M.,Sherbow, Tobias J.,Pluth, Michael D.

, p. 9644 - 9647 (2020)

We report here that a fluorescent benzobisimidazolium salt (TBBI) can be used for the fluorescent and colorimetric detection of carbonyl sulfide (COS) over related heterocumulenes including CO2 and CS2 in wet MeCN. The reaction between TBBI and COS in the presence of fluoride yields a highly fluorescent (λem = 354 nm) and colored product (λmax = 321, 621 nm), that is readily observed by the naked eye. We view these results as a first step toward developing activity-based probes for COS detection.

Monothiocarbamates Strongly Inhibit Carbonic Anhydrases in Vitro and Possess Intraocular Pressure Lowering Activity in an Animal Model of Glaucoma

Vullo, Daniela,Durante, Mariaconcetta,Di Leva, Francesco Saverio,Cosconati, Sandro,Masini, Emanuela,Scozzafava, Andrea,Novellino, Ettore,Supuran, Claudiu T.,Carta, Fabrizio

, p. 5857 - 5867 (2016)

A series of monothiocarbamates (MTCs) were prepared from primary/secondary amines and COS as potential carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitors, using the dithiocarbamates, the xanthates, and the trithiocarbonates as lead compounds. The MTCs effectively inhibited the pharmacologically relevant human (h) hCAs isoforms I, II, IX, and XII in vitro and showed KIs spanning between the low and medium nanomolar range. By means of a computational study, the MTC moiety binding mode on the CAs was explained. Furthermore, a selection of MTCs were evaluated in a normotensive glaucoma rabbit model for their intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering effects and showed interesting activity.

Infrared chemiluminescence studies of the H+(CH3)3COCl and H+RC(O)SCl (R = Cl, F, OCH3) reactions: Observation of OCS infrared chemiluminescence

Manke II,Setser

, p. 11013 - 11024 (2000)

Infrared chemiluminescence from a room-temperature flow reactor was used to study the reactions of H atoms with (CH3)3COCl, ClC(O)SCl, FC(O)SCl, and CH3OC(O)SCl. Infrared emission spectra were recorded from the HCl, HF, and OCS products. The anharmonic shifts from bands involving ν1, ν2, and ν3 excitation are too small to obtain information about bending vs stretch excitation of OCS from the Δν3 = -1 spectra; however, a computer simulation method was developed to analyze the Δν3 = -1 transition to assign the average total vibrational energy of OCS, 〈Ev(OCS)〉. The enthalpy changes for the carbonylsulfenyl chloride reactions were estimated from ab initio calculations. The proposed mechanism for the carbonylsulfenyl chlorides includes two reaction pathways: one involves interaction with the S-Cl bond to give HCl; the second involves an RC(O)SCl·H adduct that subsequently gives RH and OCS (+Cl). The 〈Ev(OCS)〉 values were 17.2, 14.6, and 8.4 kcal mol-1 from FC(O)SCl, CH3OC(O)SCl, and ClC(O)SCl, respectively. The fraction of the available energy released as HCl vibrational energy, {fv(HCl)〉, from reaction with the S-Cl bond was approximately 0.3 for all three reactions. The reaction mechanism for H+(CH3)3COCl, which was employed as a reference reaction, is thought to be direct abstraction and 〈fv(HCl)〉 is 0.23.

Wampler, F. B.,Horowitz, A.,Calvert, J. G.

, p. 5523 - 5532 (1972)

Experimental and theoretical studies on bis(chlorocarbonyl)trisulfane, ClC(O)SSSC(O)Cl

Tobón, Yeny A.,Cozzarín, Melina V.,Della Védova, Carlos O.,Romano, Rosana M.

, p. 37 - 42 (2009)

Bis(chlorocarbonyl)trisulfane, ClC(O)SSSC(O)Cl, was prepared by the reaction of (CH3)2CHOC(S)SC(S)OCH(CH3)2 and SO2Cl2 at 65 °C. The compound was characterized and identified by vibrational

96: A Giant Self-Assembled Copper(I) Supramolecular Wheel Exhibiting Photoluminescence Tuning and Correlations with Dynamic Solvation and Solventless Synthesis

Gupta, Arvind K.,Kishore, Pilli V. V. N.,Cyue, Jhih-Yu,Liao, Jian-Hong,Duminy, Welni,Van Zyl, Werner E.,Liu

, p. 8973 - 8983 (2021)

The hierarchical self-organization of structurally complex high-nuclearity metal clusters with metallosupramolecular wheel architectures that are obtained from the self-Assembly of smaller solvated cluster units is rare and unique. Here, we use the potentially heteroditopic monothiocarbonate ligand and demonstrate for the first time the synthesis and structure of a solvated non-cyclic hexadecanuclear cluster [Cu{SC(O)OiPr}]16·2THF (1) that can simultaneously desolvate and self-Assemble in solution and subsequently form a giant metallaring, [Cu{SC(O)OiPr}]96 (2). We also demonstrate a luminescent precursor to cluster (2) can be achieved through a solventless and rapid mechanochemical synthesis. Cluster (2) is the highest nuclearity copper(I) wheel and the largest metal cluster containing a heterodichalcogen (O, S) ligand reported to date. Cluster (2) also exhibits solid-state luminescence with relatively long emission lifetimes at 4.1, 13.9 (μs). The synthetic strategy described here opens new research avenues by replacing solvent molecules in stable {Cu16} clusters with designed building units that can form new hybrid and multifunctional finite supramolecular materials. This finding may lead to the development of novel high-nuclearity materials self-Assembled in a facile manner with tunable optical properties.

Riesenfeld,Faber

, p. 119 (1920)

Jones, B. M. R.,Burrows, J. P.,Cox, R. A.,Penkett, S. A.

, p. 372 - 376 (1982)

Robinson,Jones

, p. 62 (1912)

C-Nitrosothioformamide: A Donor Template for Dual Release of HNO and H2S

Kelly, Shane S.,Ni, Xiang,Radford, Miles N.,Xian, Ming,Yuen, Vivian

, (2022/04/12)

C-Nitrosothioformamide was demonstrated to be a donor template for dual release of HNO and COS triggered by a retro-Diels-Alder reaction. COS is an H2S precursor in the presence of carbonic anhydrase. This process produces HNO and H2S in a slow but steady manner. As such, the direct reaction between HNO and H2S under this situation appears to be minor. This may provide a useful tool for studying the synergistic effects of HNO and H2S.

Alkylsulfenyl thiocarbonates: precursors to hydropersulfides potently attenuate oxidative stress

Aggarwal, Sahil C.,Khodade, Vinayak S.,Paolocci, Nazareno,Pharoah, Blaze M.,Toscano, John P.

, p. 8252 - 8259 (2021/06/22)

The recent discovery of the prevalence of hydropersulfides (RSSH) species in biological systems suggests their potential roles in cell regulatory processes. However, the reactive and transient nature of RSSH makes their study difficult, and dependent on the use of donor molecules. Herein, we report alkylsulfenyl thiocarbonates as a new class of RSSH precursors that efficiently release RSSH under physiologically relevant conditions. RSSH release kinetics from these precursors are tunable through electronic modification of the thiocarbonate carbonyl group's electrophilicity. In addition, these precursors also react with thiols to release RSSH with a minor amount of carbonyl sulfide (COS). Importantly, RSSH generation by these precursors protects against oxidative stress in H9c2 cardiac myoblasts. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ability of these precursors to increase intracellular RSSH levels.

Alkylamine-Substituted Perthiocarbamates: Dual Precursors to Hydropersulfide and Carbonyl Sulfide with Cardioprotective Actions

Khodade, Vinayak S.,Pharoah, Blaze M.,Paolocci, Nazareno,Toscano, John P.

supporting information, p. 4309 - 4316 (2020/03/05)

The recent discovery of hydropersulfides (RSSH) in mammalian systems suggests their potential roles in cell signaling. However, the exploration of RSSH biological significance is challenging due to their instability under physiological conditions. Herein, we report the preparation, RSSH-releasing properties, and cytoprotective nature of alkylamine-substituted perthiocarbamates. Triggered by a base-sensitive, self-immolative moiety, these precursors show efficient RSSH release and also demonstrate the ability to generate carbonyl sulfide (COS) in the presence of thiols. Using this dually reactive alkylamine-substituted perthiocarbamate platform, the generation of both RSSH and COS is tunable with respect to half-life, pH, and availability of thiols. Importantly, these precursors exhibit cytoprotective effects against hydrogen peroxide-mediated toxicity in H9c2 cells and cardioprotective effects against myocardial ischemic/reperfusion injury, indicating their potential application as new RSSH- and/or COS-releasing therapeutics.

Process route upstream and downstream products

Process route

triethylammonium N-p-nitrophenylmonothiocarbamate

triethylammonium N-p-nitrophenylmonothiocarbamate

carbon oxide sulfide
463-58-1

carbon oxide sulfide

4-nitro-aniline
100-01-6,104810-17-5

4-nitro-aniline

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With Tris buffer; acetic acid; In water; at 25 ℃; Mechanism; Rate constant; general acid catalysis: other buffer (phosphate), other catalyst (cacodylic acid), pH 7.41 - pH 8.40;
potassium N-p-nitrophenylmonothiocarbamate

potassium N-p-nitrophenylmonothiocarbamate

carbon oxide sulfide
463-58-1

carbon oxide sulfide

4-nitro-aniline
100-01-6,104810-17-5

4-nitro-aniline

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With 1H-imidazole; In water; at 25 ℃; Mechanism; Rate constant; general acid catalysis;
Butyl-thiocarbamic acid; compound with butylamine
64573-66-6

Butyl-thiocarbamic acid; compound with butylamine

carbon oxide sulfide
463-58-1

carbon oxide sulfide

N,N'-di-n-butylurea
1792-17-2

N,N'-di-n-butylurea

N-butylamine
109-73-9,85404-21-3

N-butylamine

Conditions
Conditions Yield
at 131 ℃; Thermodynamic data; ΔS(excit.)=-19,79; E*;
methyl 4-nitrophenyl thionocarbonate
1014-94-4

methyl 4-nitrophenyl thionocarbonate

methanol
67-56-1

methanol

carbon oxide sulfide
463-58-1

carbon oxide sulfide

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With borate buffer; potassium chloride; In water; at 25 ℃; Rate constant; Mechanism;
Thiocarbonic acid O-ethyl ester O-(4-nitro-phenyl) ester
177170-39-7

Thiocarbonic acid O-ethyl ester O-(4-nitro-phenyl) ester

carbon oxide sulfide
463-58-1

carbon oxide sulfide

ethanol
64-17-5

ethanol

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With borate buffer; potassium chloride; In water; at 25 ℃; Rate constant; Mechanism;
bis-tribromomethyl trisulfide
116277-70-4

bis-tribromomethyl trisulfide

water
7732-18-5

water

bromine
7726-95-6

bromine

carbon oxide sulfide
463-58-1

carbon oxide sulfide

sulfuric acid
7664-93-9

sulfuric acid

hydrogen bromide
10035-10-6,12258-64-9

hydrogen bromide

methylammonium carbonate
15719-64-9,15719-76-3,97762-63-5

methylammonium carbonate

Conditions
Conditions Yield
at 100 ℃;
(E)-2-hydroxylbenzaldehyde oxime
21013-96-7

(E)-2-hydroxylbenzaldehyde oxime

phenyl isothiocyanate
103-72-0

phenyl isothiocyanate

acetone
67-64-1

acetone

salicylonitrile
611-20-1

salicylonitrile

carbon oxide sulfide
463-58-1

carbon oxide sulfide

N,N-diphenylthiourea
102-08-9

N,N-diphenylthiourea

Conditions
Conditions Yield
1-(4-nitrophenyloxythiocarbonyl)pyridinium chloride

1-(4-nitrophenyloxythiocarbonyl)pyridinium chloride

pyridine
110-86-1

pyridine

carbon oxide sulfide
463-58-1

carbon oxide sulfide

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With phosphate buffer; potassium chloride; In water; at 25 ℃; pH=6.5; Further Variations:; pH-values; Kinetics;
4-methyl-1-(4-nitro-phenoxythiocarbonyl)-pyridinium; chloride

4-methyl-1-(4-nitro-phenoxythiocarbonyl)-pyridinium; chloride

picoline
108-89-4

picoline

carbon oxide sulfide
463-58-1

carbon oxide sulfide

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With phosphate buffer; potassium chloride; In water; at 25 ℃; pH=6.5; Further Variations:; pH-values; Kinetics;
3,4-dimethyl-1-(4-nitro-phenoxythiocarbonyl)-pyridinium; chloride

3,4-dimethyl-1-(4-nitro-phenoxythiocarbonyl)-pyridinium; chloride

3,4-Lutidin
583-58-4

3,4-Lutidin

carbon oxide sulfide
463-58-1

carbon oxide sulfide

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With phosphate buffer; potassium chloride; In water; at 25 ℃; pH=6.5; Further Variations:; pH-values; Kinetics;

Global suppliers and manufacturers

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  • Chemwill Asia Co., Ltd.
  • Business Type:Manufacturers
  • Contact Tel:021-51086038
  • Emails:sales@chemwill.com
  • Main Products:56
  • Country:China (Mainland)
  • Hangzhou Dingyan Chem Co., Ltd
  • Business Type:Manufacturers
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  • Emails:anthony@antimex.com
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  • Emails:marketing@easchem.com
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  • Emails:sales@joyinchem.net
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  • Emails:romesh.collins@milliporesigma.com
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