Welcome to LookChem.com Sign In|Join Free

CAS

  • or

1313-13-9

Post Buying Request

1313-13-9 Suppliers

Recommended suppliersmore

  • Product
  • FOB Price
  • Min.Order
  • Supply Ability
  • Supplier
  • Contact Supplier

1313-13-9 Usage

Chemical Description

Manganese dioxide is a black or brown solid that is often used as a catalyst.

Description

Manganese dioxide (MnO2), also known as pyrolusite when found in nature, is the most important non-metallic form of manganese. It is a black crystalline solid or powder that is insoluble in water and has a high theoretical specific capacitance. Manganese dioxide is an eco-friendly chemical and the most plentiful of all manganese compounds.

Uses

Used in Battery Industry:
Manganese dioxide is used as a depolarizer in dry cell batteries, such as traditional alkaline and rechargeable battery cells. It takes in electrons through a redox reaction, becoming manganese III oxide.
Used in Steel Manufacturing:
Manganese dioxide is the primary precursor to ferromanganese, an alloy of iron used for its lower melting point and low cost. Manganese serves to increase the hardness and decrease the brittleness of steel.
Used in Glass and Ceramics Industry:
Manganese dioxide is used as a colorant and decolorizer in glass and ceramics. It helps remove the green tint caused by iron impurities in glassmaking.
Used in Water Purification:
Manganese dioxide is used in the purification of drinking water, acting as an adsorbent for hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide.
Used in Chemical Synthesis:
Manganese dioxide is used as an oxidizing agent in many organic syntheses, such as the production of quinone and hydroquinone.
Used in Laboratory Preparation:
Manganese dioxide is used as a catalyst in the laboratory preparation of oxygen from potassium chlorate.
Used in Textile Industry:
Manganese dioxide is used in the preparation for printing and dyeing textiles.
Used in Paints and Varnishes:
Manganese dioxide is used as a drier for paints and varnishes.
Used in Rubber Industry:
Manganese dioxide is used as a curing agent for polysulfide rubbers.
Used in Fertilizers:
Manganese dioxide is used as an additive to fertilizers.
Used in Analytical Chemistry:
Manganese dioxide is used as an analytical reagent.
Used in Pigments:
Manganese dioxide is used in making pigments for glasses and ceramics.
Used in Electrotechnics:
Manganese dioxide is used in electrotechnics, such as in the production of welding rods and fluxes, and ceramic magnets (ferrites).
Used in Environmental Applications:
Manganese dioxide supported on inorganic oxide can be used for the oxidation of methylamine through Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO). It also has high potential as a highly efficient and robust material for water oxidation reactions (WORs).

Toxicity evaluation

Inhalation exposure to high concentrations of manganese dusts (specifically manganese dioxide [MnO2] and manganese tetroxide [Mn3O4]) can cause an inflammatory response in the lung, which, over time, can result in impaired lung function. Lung toxicity is manifested as an increased susceptibility to infections such as bronchitis and can result in manganic pneumonia. Pneumonia has also been observed following acute inhalation exposures to particulates containing other metals. Thus, this effect might be characteristic of inhalable particulate matter and might not depend solely on the manganese content of the particle.

Resources

https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jnm/2013/736375/ https://b2bbusinessnews.wordpress.com/2012/03/22/uses-and-benefits-of-manganese-dioxide/ http://metalpedia.asianmetal.com/metal/manganese/application.shtml https://www.chemistryworld.com/podcasts/manganese-dioxide/9217.article https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manganese_dioxide https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferroalloy

Preparation

Pure manganese(IV) oxide (precipitate form) may be prepared by reducing permanganate ion with a manganous salt: 2KMnO4 + 3MnSO4 + 2H2O → 5MnO2 + K2SO4 + 2H2SO4 Manganese(IV) oxide can also be precipitated by oxidation of a manganese(II) salt using an oxidizing agent such as hypochlorite or peroxydisulphate: Mn2+ + S2O82– + 2H2O → MnO2 + 2SO42– + 4H+ Manganese(IV) oxide may also be made by thermal decomposition of manganese(II) nitrate; or from roasting manganese(II) carbonate in air: Mn(NO3)2 → MnO2 + 2NO2 MnCO3 + ? O2 → MnO2 + CO2 A highly active gamma-MnO2 can be produced by treating manganese(III) oxide with hot sulfuric acid: Mn2O3 + H2SO4 → MnO2 + MnSO4 + H2O Mn2O3 is derived from pyrolusite by heating the mineral at 600–800°C or reducing with powdered coal at 300°C.

Reactivity Profile

The stability of manganese dioxide is due primarily to its insolubility. It is, however, readily attacked by reducing agents in acid solution, for example oxidizing concentrated hydrochloric acid to chlorine. In hot concentrated alkali it dissolves to give a purple solution which contains an equimolar mixture of trivalent manganese, probably as (Mn(OH)6)3- and manganate(V), (MnO4)3-. Manganese dioxide is also one of the most active catalysts for the oxidation of carbon monoxide near room temperature.

Hazard

Oxidizing agent, may ignite organic materials.

Flammability and Explosibility

Nonflammable

Safety Profile

Poison by intravenous and intratracheal routes. Moderately toxic by subcutaneous route. Experimental reproductive effects. A powerful oxidizer. Flammable by chemical reaction. It must not be heated or rubbed in contact with easily oxilzable matter. Violent thermite reaction when heated with aluminum. Potentially explosive reaction with hydrogen peroxide, peroxomonosulfuric acid, chlorates + heat, anilinium perchlorate. Ignition on contact with hydrogen sulfide. Violent reaction with oxidizers, potassium azide (when warmed), diboron tetrafluoride, Incandescent reaction with calcium hydride, chlorine trifluoride, rubidium acetylide (at 350℃). Vigorous reaction with hydroxylaminium chloride. Incompatible with H202, H2SO j, Naz02. Keep away from heat and flammable materials. See also MANGANESE COMPOUNDS.

Potential Exposure

Manganese dioxide is used as depolarizer for dry cell batteries, for production of manganese metal; as an oxidizing agent; laboratory reagent; and in making pyrotechnics and matches; in dry cell batteries.

Shipping

UN1479 Oxidizing solid, n.o.s., Hazard Class: 5.1; Labels: 5.1-Oxidizer, Technical Name Required. UN3137 (powder) Oxidizing solid, flammable, Hazard Class: 5.1; Labels: 5.1-Oxidizer, 4.1 Flammable solid, Technical Name Required.

Incompatibilities

A powerful oxidizer. Incompatible with strong acids; reducing agents; combustible materials (such as fuel and clothing; organic materials. Mixtures with calcium hydride is a heat- and friction-sensitive explosive. Vigorous reaction with hydrogen sulfide, diboron tetrafluoride; calcium hydride; chlorine trifluoride; hydrogen peroxide; hydroxyaluminum chloride; anilinium perchlorate. Decomposes when heated above 553C producing manganese(III)oxide and oxygen, which increases fire hazard. Reacts violently with aluminum (thermite reaction), potassium azide; rubidium acetylide; in the presence of hea

Waste Disposal

Generators of waste (equal to or greater than 100 kg/mo) containing this contaminant, EPA hazardous waste number N450, must conform to USEPA regulations for storage, transportation, treatment, and disposal of waste. Dispose of waste material as hazardous waste using a licensed disposal contractor to an approved landfill. Dispose of contents and container to an approved waste disposal plant. Containers must be disposed of properly by following package label directions or by contacting your local or federal environmental control agency, or by contacting your regional EPA office. All federal, state, and local environmental regulations must be observed. Do not discharge into drains or sewers

Check Digit Verification of cas no

The CAS Registry Mumber 1313-13-9 includes 7 digits separated into 3 groups by hyphens. The first part of the number,starting from the left, has 4 digits, 1,3,1 and 3 respectively; the second part has 2 digits, 1 and 3 respectively.
Calculate Digit Verification of CAS Registry Number 1313-13:
(6*1)+(5*3)+(4*1)+(3*3)+(2*1)+(1*3)=39
39 % 10 = 9
So 1313-13-9 is a valid CAS Registry Number.
InChI:InChI=1/C4H12N.BH2/c1-5(2,3)4;/h1-4H3;1H2/q+1;-1

1313-13-9 Well-known Company Product Price

  • Brand
  • (Code)Product description
  • CAS number
  • Packaging
  • Price
  • Detail
  • Alfa Aesar

  • (10805)  Manganese(IV) oxide, Puratronic?, 99.996% (metals basis)   

  • 1313-13-9

  • 5g

  • 485.0CNY

  • Detail
  • Alfa Aesar

  • (10805)  Manganese(IV) oxide, Puratronic?, 99.996% (metals basis)   

  • 1313-13-9

  • 25g

  • 1747.0CNY

  • Detail
  • Alfa Aesar

  • (10805)  Manganese(IV) oxide, Puratronic?, 99.996% (metals basis)   

  • 1313-13-9

  • 100g

  • 5664.0CNY

  • Detail
  • Alfa Aesar

  • (A10765)  Manganese(IV) oxide, 98%   

  • 1313-13-9

  • 10g

  • 278.0CNY

  • Detail
  • Alfa Aesar

  • (A10765)  Manganese(IV) oxide, 98%   

  • 1313-13-9

  • 100g

  • 581.0CNY

  • Detail
  • Alfa Aesar

  • (A10765)  Manganese(IV) oxide, 98%   

  • 1313-13-9

  • 500g

  • 982.0CNY

  • Detail
  • Alfa Aesar

  • (A10765)  Manganese(IV) oxide, 98%   

  • 1313-13-9

  • 2500g

  • 1379.0CNY

  • Detail
  • Alfa Aesar

  • (A10765)  Manganese(IV) oxide, 98%   

  • 1313-13-9

  • 10kg

  • 4363.0CNY

  • Detail
  • Alfa Aesar

  • (42250)  Manganese(IV) oxide, 99.9% (metals basis)   

  • 1313-13-9

  • 250g

  • 776.0CNY

  • Detail
  • Alfa Aesar

  • (42250)  Manganese(IV) oxide, 99.9% (metals basis)   

  • 1313-13-9

  • 1kg

  • 2290.0CNY

  • Detail
  • Alfa Aesar

  • (14340)  Manganese(IV) oxide, activated, tech., Mn 58% min   

  • 1313-13-9

  • 10g

  • 209.0CNY

  • Detail
  • Alfa Aesar

  • (14340)  Manganese(IV) oxide, activated, tech., Mn 58% min   

  • 1313-13-9

  • 100g

  • 253.0CNY

  • Detail

1313-13-9SDS

SAFETY DATA SHEETS

According to Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) - Sixth revised edition

Version: 1.0

Creation Date: Aug 12, 2017

Revision Date: Aug 12, 2017

1.Identification

1.1 GHS Product identifier

Product name Manganese(IV) oxide

1.2 Other means of identification

Product number -
Other names Manganese dioxide

1.3 Recommended use of the chemical and restrictions on use

Identified uses For industry use only. Adhesives and sealant chemicals,CBI,Lubricants and lubricant additives,Oxidizing/reducing agents,Plating agents and surface treating agents,Processing aids, not otherwise listed
Uses advised against no data available

1.4 Supplier's details

1.5 Emergency phone number

Emergency phone number -
Service hours Monday to Friday, 9am-5pm (Standard time zone: UTC/GMT +8 hours).

More Details:1313-13-9 SDS

1313-13-9Synthetic route

manganese(II) nitrate

manganese(II) nitrate

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

Conditions
ConditionsYield
at 430℃; for 4h;95.5%
In neat (no solvent) Kinetics; byproducts: nitrous gases; investigation of thermal decompn. at 163-196 °C;;
With chlorine In water Irradiation (UV/VIS);
manganese(II) nitrate
172332-99-9

manganese(II) nitrate

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

Conditions
ConditionsYield
at 430℃; for 4h;95.5%
manganese(II) perchlorate

manganese(II) perchlorate

A

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

B

manganese(ll) chloride

manganese(ll) chloride

Conditions
ConditionsYield
In neat (no solvent, solid phase) byproducts: Cl2, O2; thermal decompn., 190-240°C;A 95%
B 5%
manganese(II)

manganese(II)

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With fluorine In nitric acid oxidn. of weakly H2SO4-acidic ice-cooled Mn(II)-salt-soln. with F2;;91.5%
With hypochloric acid In not given
With bromine In ammonia oxidn. of ammoniacal Mn(II)-salt-soln. at 50 °C with Br2;;
Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)meso-2,3-butanediimine)

Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)meso-2,3-butanediimine)

A

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

B

Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)meso-2,3-butanediimine)OH

Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)meso-2,3-butanediimine)OH

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With O2 In pyridine 1 atm O2, refluxing for 10 h (pptn.); collection (filtration); second crop and MnO2 on evapn. of filtrate; elem. anal.;A 7%
B 90%
Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)-1,1,2,2-tetramethylethylenediimine)
64593-36-8

Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)-1,1,2,2-tetramethylethylenediimine)

A

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

B

Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)-1,1,2,2-tetramethylethylenediimine)OH

Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)-1,1,2,2-tetramethylethylenediimine)OH

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With O2 In pyridine 1 atm O2, refluxing for 10 h (pptn.); collection (filtration); second crop and MnO2 on evapn. of filtrate; elem. anal.;A 10%
B 90%
2,2′-((1E,1′E)-(ethane-1,2-diylbis(azanylylidene))bis(methanylylidene))diphenolmanganese(II)

2,2′-((1E,1′E)-(ethane-1,2-diylbis(azanylylidene))bis(methanylylidene))diphenolmanganese(II)

A

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

B

Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)ethylenediimine)OH

Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)ethylenediimine)OH

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With O2 In pyridine 1 atm O2, refluxing for 10 h (pptn.); collection (filtration); second crop and MnO2 on evapn. of filtrate; elem. anal.;A 9%
B 90%
Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)meso-1,2-diphenylethylenediimine)

Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)meso-1,2-diphenylethylenediimine)

A

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

B

Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)meso-1,2-diphenylethylenediimine)OH

Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)meso-1,2-diphenylethylenediimine)OH

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With O2 In pyridine 1 atm O2, refluxing for 10 h (pptn.); collection (filtration); second crop and MnO2 on evapn. of filtrate; elem. anal.;A 9%
B 89%
Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)-1,3-propanediimine) * H2O
58770-12-0

Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)-1,3-propanediimine) * H2O

A

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

B

Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)-1,3-propanediimine)OH

Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)-1,3-propanediimine)OH

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With O2 In pyridine 1 atm O2, refluxing for 10 h (pptn.); collection (filtration); second crop and MnO2 on evapn. of filtrate; elem. anal.;A 9%
B 88%
Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)trans-1,2-diphenylethylenediimine)

Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)trans-1,2-diphenylethylenediimine)

A

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)trans-1,2-diphenylethylenediimine)OH

Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)trans-1,2-diphenylethylenediimine)OH

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With O2 In pyridine 1 atm O2, refluxing for 10 h (pptn.); collection (filtration); second crop and MnO2 on evapn. of filtrate; elem. anal.;A 10%
B 87%
Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)o-phenylenediimine) * H2O
852529-28-3

Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)o-phenylenediimine) * H2O

A

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

B

Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)o-phenylenediimine)OH

Mn(N,N'-bis(salicylaldehyde)o-phenylenediimine)OH

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With O2 In pyridine 1 atm O2, refluxing for 10 h (pptn.); collection (filtration); second crop and MnO2 on evapn. of filtrate; elem. anal.;A 14%
B 83%
manganese
7439-96-5

manganese

A

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

B

permanganate(VII) ion

permanganate(VII) ion

Conditions
ConditionsYield
In further solvent(s) Electrolysis; in K2CO3 soln., current density 11.4-18.2 A/dm2 at 19°C;A 3.9%
B 81%
In further solvent(s) Electrolysis; in K2CO3 soln., current density 11.4-18.2 A/dm2 at 25-32°C;A 11%
B 67.6%
In further solvent(s) Electrolysis; in K2CO3 soln., current density 11.4-18.2 A/dm2 at 37°C;A 15.1%
B 58.5%
manganese(II) sulfate

manganese(II) sulfate

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

Conditions
ConditionsYield
In sulfuric acid aq. H2SO4; Electrolysis; electrolytic deposition from soln. of MnSO4 in aq. H2SO4 at 30 °C (graphite-anode coated with PbO2, c.d. 5 A/dm*dm);; product contains PbO2 (88% MnO2);;75%
With potassium permanganate In water at 80℃; for 16h;
With sodium hydroxide; potassium permanganate In water at 70℃; for 13.5h;
oxygen
80937-33-3

oxygen

manganese(II)

manganese(II)

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

Conditions
ConditionsYield
potassium hydroxide; sodium hydroxide In water oxidn. of Mn(2+) in alkaline soln. with oxygen;;70%
iron(III) oxide; lead(II) oxide; tin(IV) oxide In water oxidn. of Mn(2+) in alkaline soln. with oxygen;;
calcium oxide In water oxidn. of Mn(2+) in alkaline soln. with oxygen;;
cobalt(II) chloride; copper dichloride In water oxidn. of Mn(2+) in alkaline soln. with oxygen;;
Mn(2+)*NC5H4NNCHC(CH3)NNC5H4N(2-)=Mn(NC5H4NNCHC(CH3)NNC5H4N)

Mn(2+)*NC5H4NNCHC(CH3)NNC5H4N(2-)=Mn(NC5H4NNCHC(CH3)NNC5H4N)

A

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

B

Mn(2+)*NC5H4NNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H4N(2-)*O2*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H4NNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H4N)(C5H5N)O2

Mn(2+)*NC5H4NNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H4N(2-)*O2*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H4NNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H4N)(C5H5N)O2

C

Mn(2+)*NC5H4NNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H4N(2-)*O*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H4NNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H4N)(C5H5N)O

Mn(2+)*NC5H4NNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H4N(2-)*O*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H4NNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H4N)(C5H5N)O

D

Mn(3+)*NC5H4NNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H4N(2-)*OH(1-)*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H4NNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H4N)OH(C5H5N)

Mn(3+)*NC5H4NNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H4N(2-)*OH(1-)*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H4NNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H4N)OH(C5H5N)

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With O2; pyridine In pyridine dissoln. of Mn-complex (N2-atmosphere), exposing to 1 atm O2; manometricfollowing of O2 uptake (-15°C, 1 week); filtration (under O2), crystn. (-15°C, 1 week); O2(1-) and OH(1-)complexes by chromy. of filtrate (Al2O3); elem. anal.;A n/a
B 15%
C 40%
D 15%
Mn(2+)*NC5H4NNCHC(CH3)NNC5H4N(2-)=Mn(NC5H4NNCHC(CH3)NNC5H4N)

Mn(2+)*NC5H4NNCHC(CH3)NNC5H4N(2-)=Mn(NC5H4NNCHC(CH3)NNC5H4N)

A

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

B

Mn(2+)*NC5H4NNCHC(CH3)NNC5H4N(2-)*O*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H4NNCHC(CH3)NNC5H4N)(C5H5N)O

Mn(2+)*NC5H4NNCHC(CH3)NNC5H4N(2-)*O*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H4NNCHC(CH3)NNC5H4N)(C5H5N)O

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With O2; pyridine In pyridine dissoln. of Mn-complex (N2-atmosphere), exposing to 1 atm O2; manometricfollowing of O2 uptake (-15°C, 10 h); filtration (under O2), crystn. (-15°C, 1 week); elem. anal.;A n/a
B 38%
Mn(2+)*NC5H4NNC(C6H5)C(C6H5)NNC5H4N(2-)=Mn(NC5H4NNC(C6H5)C(C6H5)NNC5H4N)

Mn(2+)*NC5H4NNC(C6H5)C(C6H5)NNC5H4N(2-)=Mn(NC5H4NNC(C6H5)C(C6H5)NNC5H4N)

A

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

B

Mn(2+)*NC5H4NNC(C6H5)C(C6H5)NNC5H4N(2-)*O*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H4NNC(C6H5)C(C6H5)NNC5H4N)(C5H5N)O

Mn(2+)*NC5H4NNC(C6H5)C(C6H5)NNC5H4N(2-)*O*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H4NNC(C6H5)C(C6H5)NNC5H4N)(C5H5N)O

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With O2; pyridine In pyridine dissoln. of Mn-complex (N2-atmosphere), exposing to 1 atm O2; manometricfollowing of O2 uptake (-15°C, 10 h); filtration (under O2), crystn. (-15°C, 1 week); elem. anal.;A n/a
B 37%
Mn(2+)*NC5H4NNCHC(C(CH3)3)NNC5H4N(2-)=Mn(NC5H4NNCHC(C(CH3)3)NNC5H4N)

Mn(2+)*NC5H4NNCHC(C(CH3)3)NNC5H4N(2-)=Mn(NC5H4NNCHC(C(CH3)3)NNC5H4N)

A

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

B

Mn(2+)*NC5H4NNCHC(C(CH3)3)NNC5H4N(2-)*O*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H4NNCHC(C(CH3)3)NNC5H4N)(C5H5N)O

Mn(2+)*NC5H4NNCHC(C(CH3)3)NNC5H4N(2-)*O*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H4NNCHC(C(CH3)3)NNC5H4N)(C5H5N)O

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With O2; pyridine In pyridine dissoln. of Mn-complex (N2-atmosphere), exposing to 1 atm O2; manometricfollowing of O2 uptake (-15°C, 10 h); filtration (under O2), crystn. (-15°C, 1 week); elem. anal.;A n/a
B 36%
Mn(2+)*NC5H3BrNNCHCHNNC5H3BrN(2-)=Mn(NC5H3BrNNCHCHNNC5H3BrN)

Mn(2+)*NC5H3BrNNCHCHNNC5H3BrN(2-)=Mn(NC5H3BrNNCHCHNNC5H3BrN)

A

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

B

Mn(2+)*NC5H3BrNNCHCHNNC5H3BrN(2-)*O2*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H3BrNNCHCHNNC5H3BrN)(C5H5N)O2

Mn(2+)*NC5H3BrNNCHCHNNC5H3BrN(2-)*O2*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H3BrNNCHCHNNC5H3BrN)(C5H5N)O2

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With O2; pyridine In pyridine dissoln. of Mn-complex (N2-atmosphere), exposing to 1 atm O2; manometricfollowing of O2 uptake (-15°C, 10 h); filtration (under O2), crystn. (-15°C, 1 week); elem. anal.;A n/a
B 36%
Mn(2+)*NC5H4NNCHCHNNC5H4N(2-)=Mn(NC5H4NNCHCHNNC5H4N)

Mn(2+)*NC5H4NNCHCHNNC5H4N(2-)=Mn(NC5H4NNCHCHNNC5H4N)

A

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

B

Mn(2+)*NC5H4NNCHCHNNC5H4N(2-)*O*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H4NNCHCHNNC5H4N)(C5H5N)O

Mn(2+)*NC5H4NNCHCHNNC5H4N(2-)*O*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H4NNCHCHNNC5H4N)(C5H5N)O

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With O2; pyridine In pyridine dissoln. of Mn-complex (N2-atmosphere), exposing to 1 atm O2; manometricfollowing of O2 uptake (-15°C, 10 h); filtration (under O2), crystn. (-15°C, 1 week); elem. anal.;A n/a
B 35%
Mn(2+)*NC5H3BrNNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3BrN(2-)=Mn(NC5H3BrNNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3BrN)

Mn(2+)*NC5H3BrNNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3BrN(2-)=Mn(NC5H3BrNNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3BrN)

A

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

B

Mn(2+)*NC5H3BrNNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3BrN(2-)*O*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H3BrNNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3BrN)(C5H5N)O

Mn(2+)*NC5H3BrNNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3BrN(2-)*O*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H3BrNNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3BrN)(C5H5N)O

C

Mn(2+)*NC5H3BrNNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3BrN(2-)*O2*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H3BrNNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3BrN)(C5H5N)O2

Mn(2+)*NC5H3BrNNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3BrN(2-)*O2*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H3BrNNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3BrN)(C5H5N)O2

D

Mn(3+)*NC5H3BrNNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3BrN(2-)*OH(1-)*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H3BrNNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3BrN)OH(C5H5N)

Mn(3+)*NC5H3BrNNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3BrN(2-)*OH(1-)*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H3BrNNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3BrN)OH(C5H5N)

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With O2; pyridine In pyridine dissoln. of Mn-complex (N2-atmosphere), exposing to 1 atm O2; manometricfollowing of O2 uptake (-15°C, 1 week); filtration (under O2), crystn. (-15°C, 1 week); O2(1-) and OH(1-)complexes by chromy. of filtrate (Al2O3); elem. anal.;A n/a
B 35%
C 14%
D 12%
Mn(2+)*NC5H3(CH3)NNCHCHNNC5H3(CH3)N(2-)=Mn(NC5H3(CH3)NNCHCHNNC5H3(CH3)N)

Mn(2+)*NC5H3(CH3)NNCHCHNNC5H3(CH3)N(2-)=Mn(NC5H3(CH3)NNCHCHNNC5H3(CH3)N)

A

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

B

Mn(2+)*NC5H3(CH3)NNCHCHNNC5H3(CH3)N(2-)*O2*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H3(CH3)NNCHCHNNC5H3(CH3)N)(C5H5N)O2

Mn(2+)*NC5H3(CH3)NNCHCHNNC5H3(CH3)N(2-)*O2*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H3(CH3)NNCHCHNNC5H3(CH3)N)(C5H5N)O2

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With O2; pyridine In pyridine dissoln. of Mn-complex (N2-atmosphere), exposing to 1 atm O2; manometricfollowing of O2 uptake (-15°C, 10 h); filtration (under O2), crystn. (-15°C, 1 week); elem. anal.;A n/a
B 34%
Mn(2+)*NC5H3(CH3)NNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3(CH3)N(2-)=Mn(NC5H3(CH3)NNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3(CH3)N)

Mn(2+)*NC5H3(CH3)NNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3(CH3)N(2-)=Mn(NC5H3(CH3)NNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3(CH3)N)

A

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

B

Mn(2+)*NC5H3(CH3)NNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3(CH3)N(2-)*O2*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H3(CH3)NNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3(CH3)N)(C5H5N)O2

Mn(2+)*NC5H3(CH3)NNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3(CH3)N(2-)*O2*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H3(CH3)NNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3(CH3)N)(C5H5N)O2

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With O2; pyridine In pyridine dissoln. of Mn-complex (N2-atmosphere), exposing to 1 atm O2; manometricfollowing of O2 uptake (-15°C, 10 h); filtration (under O2), crystn. (-15°C, 1 week); elem. anal.;A n/a
B 32%
Mn(2+)*NC5H4NN(C6H8)NNC5H4N(2-)=Mn(NC5H4NN(C6H8)NNC5H4N)

Mn(2+)*NC5H4NN(C6H8)NNC5H4N(2-)=Mn(NC5H4NN(C6H8)NNC5H4N)

A

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

B

Mn(2+)*NC5H4NN(C6H8)NNC5H4N(2-)*O*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H4NN(C6H8)NNC5H4N)(C5H5N)O

Mn(2+)*NC5H4NN(C6H8)NNC5H4N(2-)*O*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H4NN(C6H8)NNC5H4N)(C5H5N)O

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With O2; pyridine In pyridine dissoln. of Mn-complex (N2-atmosphere), exposing to 1 atm O2; manometricfollowing of O2 uptake (-15°C, 10 h); filtration (under O2), crystn. (-15°C, 1 week); elem. anal.;A n/a
B 30%
Mn(2+)*NC5H3ClNNCHCHNNC5H3ClN(2-)=Mn(NC5H3ClNNCHCHNNC5H3ClN)

Mn(2+)*NC5H3ClNNCHCHNNC5H3ClN(2-)=Mn(NC5H3ClNNCHCHNNC5H3ClN)

A

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

B

Mn(2+)*NC5H3ClNNCHCHNNC5H3ClN(2-)*O2*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H3ClNNCHCHNNC5H3ClN)(C5H5N)O2

Mn(2+)*NC5H3ClNNCHCHNNC5H3ClN(2-)*O2*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H3ClNNCHCHNNC5H3ClN)(C5H5N)O2

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With O2; pyridine In pyridine dissoln. of Mn-complex (N2-atmosphere), exposing to 1 atm O2; manometricfollowing of O2 uptake (-15°C, 10 h); filtration (under O2), crystn. (-15°C, 1 week); elem. anal.;A n/a
B 30%
manganese(II) chloride tetrahydrate

manganese(II) chloride tetrahydrate

Na16[Na2(water)2Mn2(As2W15O56)2]*50(water)

Na16[Na2(water)2Mn2(As2W15O56)2]*50(water)

A

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

B

Na15[Mn(water)Mn2(As2W15O56)2]*55(water)

Na15[Mn(water)Mn2(As2W15O56)2]*55(water)

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With Na2S2O8; NaCl In water mixing MnCl2*4H2O in aq. NaCl, As compd. at 65°C, mixing for 30 min, addn. of Na2S2O8, heating to 80°C for 2 h; hot filtration, storage at room temp. in air, filtration, washing with 1 M NaCl and EtOH, air drying;A n/a
B 30%
Mn(2+)*NC5H3ClNNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3ClN(2-)=Mn(NC5H3ClNNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3ClN)

Mn(2+)*NC5H3ClNNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3ClN(2-)=Mn(NC5H3ClNNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3ClN)

A

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

B

Mn(2+)*NC5H3ClNNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3ClN(2-)*O2*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H3ClNNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3ClN)(C5H5N)O2

Mn(2+)*NC5H3ClNNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3ClN(2-)*O2*C5H5N=Mn(NC5H3ClNNC(CH3)C(CH3)NNC5H3ClN)(C5H5N)O2

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With O2; pyridine In pyridine dissoln. of Mn-complex (N2-atmosphere), exposing to 1 atm O2; manometricfollowing of O2 uptake (-15°C, 10 h); filtration (under O2), crystn. (-15°C, 1 week); elem. anal.;A n/a
B 28%
manganese(II) perchlorate hexahydrate

manganese(II) perchlorate hexahydrate

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With air; (CH2N(i-Pr)CH2C9H6N)2; H2O2 In methanol mixt. of ligand and Mn salt (1 equiv.) in MeOH was stirred for 2 d in air at room temp.; filtered; H2O2 added to filtrate;27%
4C48H44O16(4-)*9Mn(2+)*22H2O*4C3H7NO*2CHO2(1-)

4C48H44O16(4-)*9Mn(2+)*22H2O*4C3H7NO*2CHO2(1-)

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

Conditions
ConditionsYield
Stage #1: 4C48H44O16(4-)*9Mn(2+)*22H2O*4C3H7NO*2CHO2(1-) at 212℃;
Stage #2: at 302℃;
15.1%
manganese(ll) chloride

manganese(ll) chloride

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With potassium permanganate In water at 30 - 70℃; for 16h;
With sodium hydroxide; potassium permanganate In water at 70℃; for 13h;
With chlorine In water Irradiation (UV/VIS);
manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

C19H24O2
1234357-54-0

C19H24O2

4'-hexyloxybiphenyl-4-carbaldehyde
121118-78-3

4'-hexyloxybiphenyl-4-carbaldehyde

Conditions
ConditionsYield
In dichloromethane100%
manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

sodium hypochlorite
7681-52-9

sodium hypochlorite

sodium hydroxide
1310-73-2

sodium hydroxide

permanganate(VII) ion

permanganate(VII) ion

Conditions
ConditionsYield
copper(II) sulfate In not given 80-90°C, 20 min; not isolated; UV/VIS spectrometry;98.5%
cobalt(II) nitrate In not given 80-90°C, 20 min; not isolated;73%
silver nitrate In not given 80-90°C, 20 min; not isolated;72%
iron(III) sulfate In not given 80-90°C, 20 min; not isolated;65%
manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

copper(II) oxide

copper(II) oxide

CuMnO3

CuMnO3

Conditions
ConditionsYield
Stage #1: manganese(IV) oxide; copper(II) oxide In water at 110℃; Green chemistry;
Stage #2: at 180℃; for 3h; Green chemistry;
Stage #3: at 900℃; for 20h; Calcination; Green chemistry;
98%
manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

(η5-cyclopentadienyl)Co((MeO)C6H3(CH2CH2OH)C6H4N)C(O)CH2CH2

(η5-cyclopentadienyl)Co((MeO)C6H3(CH2CH2OH)C6H4N)C(O)CH2CH2

(η5-cyclopentadienyl)Co((MeO)C6H2(CH2CH2O)C6H4N)C(O)CH2CH2

(η5-cyclopentadienyl)Co((MeO)C6H2(CH2CH2O)C6H4N)C(O)CH2CH2

Conditions
ConditionsYield
In dichloromethane 23°C, 5-30 min; IR, (1)H- and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy, DEPT, MS;96%
manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

pentafluorobenzenesulfinamide
54556-76-2

pentafluorobenzenesulfinamide

2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzenesulfonamide
778-36-9

2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzenesulfonamide

Conditions
ConditionsYield
In benzene oxidn., in anhydr. C6H6 at 70°C, 16 h;96%
In benzene oxidn., in anhydr. C6H6 at 70°C, 16 h;96%
In benzene in dry benzene 70°C;
In benzene in dry benzene 70°C;
manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

lithium hydroxide monohydrate
1310-66-3

lithium hydroxide monohydrate

lithium nitrate

lithium nitrate

lithium manganate

lithium manganate

Conditions
ConditionsYield
In melt mixing of LiOH*H2O, LiNO3 and MnO2 by grinding in a mortar, heating at 280°C for 12 h in air, cooling to room temp.; washing with distd. water, centrifuging, drying at 80°C under vac.;95%
manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

phosphonic Acid
13598-36-2

phosphonic Acid

borax

borax

water
7732-18-5

water

Na(1+)*Mn(3+)*B(3+)*P2O7(4-)*3OH(1-)=NaMn[BP2O7(OH)3]

Na(1+)*Mn(3+)*B(3+)*P2O7(4-)*3OH(1-)=NaMn[BP2O7(OH)3]

Conditions
ConditionsYield
In water High Pressure; MnO2 (5 mmol), B compd. (10 mmol), and H3PO3 (45 mmol) in H2O, mixt. sealed, heated at 200°C for 4 d; washed hot water (80°C), elem. anal.;95%
manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

dicarbonyl[1-4-η-5-(2-hydroxyethyl)cyclohepta-1,3-diene](triphenyl phosphite)iron
103816-90-6

dicarbonyl[1-4-η-5-(2-hydroxyethyl)cyclohepta-1,3-diene](triphenyl phosphite)iron

Fe(CO)2(P(OC6H5)3)(C7H8(CH2CH2O))
103816-95-1

Fe(CO)2(P(OC6H5)3)(C7H8(CH2CH2O))

Conditions
ConditionsYield
In benzene refluxing MnO2 (overnight, water separator), cooling, addn. Fe-compd., refluxing (20 min); cooling, filtration (Celite), removal solvent;90%
manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

pyrite

pyrite

oxygen
80937-33-3

oxygen

manganese(II) sulfate

manganese(II) sulfate

Conditions
ConditionsYield
In neat (no solvent) byproducts: Fe2O3; on heating at 800°C for 0.5hours;;89%
In neat (no solvent) byproducts: Fe2O3; on heating at 800°C for 0.5hours;;89%
In neat (no solvent) temp. should not be higher then 700 up to 800°C (thermal decompn. of MnSO4);;
In neat (no solvent) temp. should not be higher then 700 up to 800°C (thermal decompn. of MnSO4);;
manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

pyrite

pyrite

manganese(II) sulfate

manganese(II) sulfate

Conditions
ConditionsYield
In neat (no solvent) MnO2:pyrite=1:1, 7h, 500°C;; MnSO4 as crust on MnO2;;88%
In neat (no solvent) MnO2:pyrite=1:1, 7h, 500°C;; MnSO4 as crust on MnO2;;88%
In neat (no solvent) best react. conditions: 500°C, 1h;;
manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

Fe(C5H4CHMeCH2CH(NMe2)C5H3CHCHCH2OH)

Fe(C5H4CHMeCH2CH(NMe2)C5H3CHCHCH2OH)

Fe(C5H4CHMeCH2CH(NMe2)C5H3CHCHCHO)

Fe(C5H4CHMeCH2CH(NMe2)C5H3CHCHCHO)

Conditions
ConditionsYield
In dichloromethane (Ar); addn. of MnO2 to CH2Cl2 soln. of ferrocenophane deriv., stirring at room temp. for 12 h; filtration through celite, evapn., elem. anal.;88%
manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

[Cu(bis[2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl]ether)2]tetrafluoroborate
947372-37-4

[Cu(bis[2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl]ether)2]tetrafluoroborate

[Cu(κ2-P,P'-bis(2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl) ether)(κ2-P,O-Ph2PC6H4OC6H4P(O)Ph2)][BF4]
947372-39-6

[Cu(κ2-P,P'-bis(2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl) ether)(κ2-P,O-Ph2PC6H4OC6H4P(O)Ph2)][BF4]

Conditions
ConditionsYield
In dichloromethane under N2; mixt. of Cu complex and MnO2 in CH2Cl2 stirred at room temp. for 2 h; filtered; concd.; Et2O added; crystals collected; elem. anal.;87%
manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

2,2-bis(3,5-bis(2-isopropoxyphenyl)-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)acetic acid
1414813-59-4

2,2-bis(3,5-bis(2-isopropoxyphenyl)-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)acetic acid

potassium tert-butylate
865-47-4

potassium tert-butylate

bis(2,2-bis(3,5-bis(2-isopropoxyphenyl)-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)acetate)manganese(II)
1414813-66-3

bis(2,2-bis(3,5-bis(2-isopropoxyphenyl)-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)acetate)manganese(II)

Conditions
ConditionsYield
Stage #1: 2,2-bis(3,5-bis(2-isopropoxyphenyl)-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)acetic acid; potassium tert-butylate In tetrahydrofuran at 20℃; for 0.5h; Schlenk technique;
Stage #2: manganese(IV) oxide In tetrahydrofuran for 1h; Reflux;
Stage #3: In tetrahydrofuran at 20℃; for 24h; Schlenk technique;
87%
hydrogenchloride
7647-01-0

hydrogenchloride

manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

cesium chloride

cesium chloride

water
7732-18-5

water

CsMnCl3(H2O)2

CsMnCl3(H2O)2

Conditions
ConditionsYield
at 150℃; for 65h;85%
manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

pentafluorophenylmercaptoamine
31377-92-1

pentafluorophenylmercaptoamine

2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzenesulfonamide
778-36-9

2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzenesulfonamide

Conditions
ConditionsYield
In benzene oxidn., in anhydr. C6H6 at 70°C, 16 h;83%
In benzene oxidn., in anhydr. C6H6 at 70°C, 16 h;83%
70°C, 16 h;
70°C, 16 h;
manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

manganese(II) nitrate

manganese(II) nitrate

trans-1,2-Cyclohexanediaminetetraacetic acid
13291-61-7

trans-1,2-Cyclohexanediaminetetraacetic acid

K{Mn(cdta)}*2.5H2O

K{Mn(cdta)}*2.5H2O

Conditions
ConditionsYield
molar ratio of C14H22N2O8:Mn(NO3)2=2:1, 0°C, 0.5-1 h; filtrn. of excess MnO2, addn. of an equal vol. of cold ethanol, then standing for several hours at 0°C, washing with abs. ethanol, drying in vac. at room temp.;80%
molar ratio of C14H22N2O8:Mn(NO3)2=2:1, 0°C, 0.5-1 h; filtrn. of excess MnO2, addn. of an equal vol. of cold ethanol, then standing for several hours at 0°C, washing with abs. ethanol, drying in vac. at room temp.;80%
molar ratio of C14H22N2O8:Mn(NO3)2=2:1, 0°C, 0.5-1 h; filtrn. of excess MnO2, addn. of an equal vol. of cold ethanol, then standing for several hours at 0°C, washing with abs. ethanol;
molar ratio of C14H22N2O8:Mn(NO3)2=2:1, 0°C, 0.5-1 h; filtrn. of excess MnO2, addn. of an equal vol. of cold ethanol, then standing for several hours at 0°C, washing with abs. ethanol;
manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

isopropyl alcohol
67-63-0

isopropyl alcohol

A

manganese oxide

manganese oxide

manganese hydroxide

manganese hydroxide

kurnakite

kurnakite

Conditions
ConditionsYield
In isopropyl alcohol byproducts: acetone; by a react. of Yb2O3 with i-PrOH at 285°C for 20 h; according to Buslaeva et al. Zh. Neorg. Khim., 2001, vol. 46, no. 3, p. 380; Neorg. Mater., 2002, vol. 38, no. 6, p. 706; XRD studies;A n/a
B 80%
C n/a
manganese(IV) oxide
1313-13-9

manganese(IV) oxide

manganese hydroxide

manganese hydroxide

kurnakite

kurnakite

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With isopropyl alcohol In isopropyl alcohol byproducts: (CH3)2CO, H2O; High Pressure; according to Buslaeva, E. Yu., et al., Zh. Neorg. Khim., 2001, vol. 46, p. 380; in glass ampule powdered oxide placed, i-PrOH added; placed intoautoclave; autoclave was pressurized; furnace temp. raised at 60-70 K/h ; heated at 300°C for 2-6 h; monitored by X-ray diffraction;A 80%
B 20%

1313-13-9Relevant articles and documents

Balarew, D.

, p. 73 - 77 (1942)

Mesoporous β-MnO2 air electrode modified with pd for rechargeability in lithium-air battery

Thapa, Arjun Kumar,Hidaka, Yuiko,Hagiwara, Hidehisa,Ida, Shintaro,Ishihara, Tatsumi

, p. A1483-A1489 (2011)

The electrochemical performance and electrode reactions using ordered mesoporous β-MnO2 modified with Pd as a cathode catalyst for rechargeable Li-air batteries was reported. Well-ordered mesoporous β-MnO2 was prepared using mesoporous silica KIT-6 as a template under hydrothermal synthesis of Mn(NO3)2H2O. The obtained mesoporous β-MnO2 shows narrow pore size distribution of 1 nm. With the dispersion of small amounts of Pd to β-MnO2, mesoporous β-MnO2 exhibited a high initial discharge capacity of 817 mAhg-cat. with high reversible capacity. Charging potential is suppressed at 3.6 V vs. LiLi, which is highly effective for preventing the decomposition of organic electrolyte. The mesoporous β-MnO2Pd electrode shows good rate capability and cycle stability. Ex-situ and in-situ XRD results suggested that the observed capacity comes primarily from the oxidation of Li to Li2O 2 followed by Li2O after discharge to 2.0 V vs. LiLi. Electron spin resonance measurements suggest that the formation of superoxide anion radicals contributs to the oxidation of Li and the radicals were recovered during charge. Ex-situ FTIR measurement suggested that no electrolyte decomposition was observed and no Li2CO3 was formed during discharge when ethylene carbonate (EC)-diethyl carbonate (DEC) (3:7), which is highly stable for Li-air battery, was used as the electrolyte.

Pinnow, J.

, p. 91 - 96 (1904)

Dymond, T. S.,Hughes, E.

, p. 314 - 318 (1897)

Local atomic arrangement and electronic structure of nanocrystalline transition metal oxides determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

Hwang, Seong-Ju,Choy, Jin-Ho

, p. 5791 - 5796 (2003)

The local crystal structure and electronic configuration of transition metal in X-ray amorphous MnO2 and CrO2 nanocrystals have been examined by using X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopy at Mn K and Cr K-edges. The Mn K-edge XAS study reveals that tetravalent manganese ions are stabilized in ?±-MnO2-type local atomic arrangement consisting of the intergrowth of edge- and corner-shared MnO6 octahedra. On the other hand, it is found from Cr K-edge XAS results that nanocrystalline CrO2 possesses two different kinds of local structures around chromium, that is, Cr2O3-type with octahedral site and CrO3-type with tetrahedral site. The presence of Cr+VI species on the surface would be helpful for Li grafting process, giving rise to excellent electrochemical performances. This work can be regarded as a strong evidence for the usefulness of XAS to study nanocrystalline electrode materials.

A novel self-assembly approach for synthesizing nanofiber aerogel supported platinum single atoms

Jiang, Zheng,Kato, Kenichi,Li, Xiaopeng,Lin, Chao,Sun, Yu,Xu, Qing,Yamauchi, Miho,Yang, Ruoou,Zhang, Hao,Zhang, Haojie,Zhao, Yonghui

, p. 15094 - 15102 (2020)

A great challenge in catalyst engineering is precisely assembling and positioning nanoscale active metals at desired locations while constructing robust functional architectures. This article presents a novel approach for constructing macroscopic Ag-doped manganese oxide aerogels (up to 2 L) while homogeneously incorporating active Pt single atoms (Pt/Ag-MnO2) based on a solution-solid-solid (SSS) mechanism. AgOx seeds were identified as key species for triggering the octopus-like growth of MnO2 nanofibers and inserting Ag and Pt into the MnO2 crystalline framework. The interconnection and entanglement among nanofibers allowed the formation of mechanically strengthened hierarchical structures, leading to one of the most robust manganese-based aerogels to date. Impressively, the Pt/Ag-MnO2 aerogel also possessed promising selectivity and stability toward the electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction, with Pt showing a high mass activity of 1.6 A/(mgPt) at 0.9 V vs. RHE. Experimental characterization and theoretical calculation confirmed Pt single atoms to be located at substitutional lattice sites, which reduced the overall oxygen reduction barriers. Our approach suggests that SSS or other analogous nanofiber or nanowire growth strategies are powerful in controlling structural formation over the entire range of length scales while being applicable to fabricating single-atom catalysts.

Synthesis of NaxMnO2+δ by a reduction of aqueous sodium permanganate with sodium iodide

Jeong,Manthiram

, p. 331 - 338 (2001)

Reduction of sodium permanganate with sodium iodide in aqueous solutions has been investigated systematically. The products formed have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, wet-chemical analysis, and surface area and magnetic susceptibility measurements after firing at various temperatures. The results reveal that the sodium content x in the reduction products NaxMnO2+δ depends strongly on the reaction pH and mildly on the relative concentrations of the reactants. Na0.7MnO2+δ obtained at pH>11 followed by firing at T>500°C adopts the P2 layer structure (hexagonal) with cation vacancies arising from a δ≈0.3. Na0.7 MnO2+δ crystallizing in a distorted P2 structure (orthorhombic) without cation vacancies (δ≈0) could be obtained by annealing the hexagonal Na0.7MnO2+δ (δ≈0.3) in N2 atmosphere around 600°C. While the orthorhombic Na0.7MnO2+δ (δ0.7MnO2+δ (δ≈0.3) transforms to spinel-like phases due to the presence of cation vacancies. Na0.5MnO2+δ obtained at a controlled pH of 9.3 adopts a metastable layer structure on firing at 500°C and a tunnel structure isostructural with Na4Mn4Ti5O18 on firing at T≥600°C. The tunnel structure is stable to ion-exchange reactions without transforming to spinel-like phases. In addition, washing the reduction products with various organic solvents before firing at higher temperatures is found to influence the reaction kinetics, composition, and crystal chemistry.

Capacitive properties of PANI/MnO2 synthesized via simultaneous-oxidation route

Zhang, Jie,Shu, Dong,Zhang, Tianren,Chen, Hongyu,Zhao, Haimin,Wang, Yongsheng,Sun, Zhenjie,Tang, Shaoqing,Fang, Xueming,Cao, Xiufang

, p. 1 - 9 (2012)

Polyaniline (PANI) and manganese dioxide (MnO2) composite (PANI/MnO2) was synthesized via a simultaneous-oxidation route. In this route, all reactants were dispersed homogenously in precursor solution and existed as ions and molecules, and involved reactions of ions and molecules generating PANI and MnO2 simultaneously. In this way, PANI molecule and MnO2 molecule contact each other and arrange alternately in the composite. The inter-molecule contact improves the conductivity of the composite. The alternative arrangement of PANI molecules and MnO2 molecules separating each other, and prevents the aggregation of PANI and cluster of MnO2 so as to decrease the particle size of the composite. The morphology, structure, porous and capacitive properties are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Branauer-Emmett-Teller test, thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, charge-discharge test and the electrochemical impedance measurements. The results show that MnO2 is predominant in the PANI/MnO2 composite and the composite exhibits larger specific surface area than pure MnO2. The maximum specific capacitance of the composite electrode reaches up to 320 F/g by charge-discharge test, 1.56 times higher than that of MnO2 (125 F/g). The specific capacitance retains approximately 84% of the initial value after 10,000 cycles, indicating the good cycle stability.

A comparison study of MnO2and Mn2O3as zinc-ion battery cathodes: An experimental and computational investigation

Shen, Hongyuan,Liu, Binbin,Nie, Zanxiang,Li, Zixuan,Jin, Shunyu,Huang, Yuan,Zhou, Hang

, p. 14408 - 14414 (2021)

The high specific capacity, low cost and environmental friendliness make manganese dioxide materials promising cathode materials for zinc-ion batteries (ZIBs). In order to understand the difference between the electrochemical behavior of manganese dioxide materials with different valence states, i.e., Mn(iii) and Mn(iv), we investigated and compared the electrochemical properties of pure MnO2 and Mn2O3 as ZIB cathodes via a combined experimental and computational approach. The MnO2 electrode showed a higher discharging capacity (270.4 mA h g-1 at 0.1 A g-1) and a superior rate performance (125.7 mA h g-1 at 3 A g-1) than the Mn2O3 electrode (188.2 mA h g-1 at 0.1 A g-1 and 87 mA h g-1 at 3 A g-1, respectively). The superior performance of the MnO2 electrode was ascribed to its higher specific surface area, higher electronic conductivity and lower diffusion barrier of Zn2+ compared to the Mn2O3 electrode. This study provides a detailed picture of the diversity of manganese dioxide electrodes as ZIB cathodes. This journal is

Catalytic effects of metal oxides on the decomposition of Potassium perchlorate

Zhang, Yunchang,Kshirsagar, Girish,Ellison, John E.,Cannon, James C.

, p. 119 - 127 (1996)

Catalytic effects of metal oxides with comparable surface areas on the decomposition of potassium perchlorate were studied by thermogravimetric analysis. The catalytic mechanism is discussed based on the relative activity of the metal oxides. It is found

Ethanol tolerant precious metal free cathode catalyst for alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells

Grimmer, Ilena,Zorn, Paul,Weinberger, Stephan,Grimmer, Christoph,Pichler, Birgit,Cermenek, Bernd,Gebetsroither, Florian,Schenk, Alexander,Mautner, Franz-Andreas,Bitschnau, Brigitte,Hacker, Viktor

, p. 325 - 331 (2017)

La0.7Sr0.3(Fe0.2Co0.8)O3 and La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 ?based cathode catalysts are synthesized by the sol-gel method. These perovskite cathode catalysts are tested in half cell configuration and compared to MnO2 as reference material in alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells (ADEFCs). The best performing cathode is tested in single cell setup using a standard carbon supported Pt0.4Ru0.2 based anode. A backside Luggin capillary is used in order to register the anode potential during all measurements. Characteristic processes of the electrodes are investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Physical characterizations of the perovskite based cathode catalysts are performed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and by X-ray diffraction showing phase pure materials. In half cell setup, La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 shows the highest tolerance toward ethanol with a performance of 614 mA cm?2 at 0.65 V vs. RHE in 6 M KOH and 1 M EtOH at RT. This catalyst outperforms the state-of-the-art precious metal-free MnO2 catalyst in presence of ethanol. In fuel cell setup, the peak power density is 27.6 mW cm?2 at a cell voltage of 0.345 V and a cathode potential of 0.873 V vs. RHE.

Factors influencing the structure of electrochemically prepared α-MnO2 and γ-MnO2 phases

Lin,Sun,Weng,Yang,Suen,Liao,Huang,Ho,Chong,Tang

, p. 6548 - 6553 (2007)

The α- and γ-phases of MnO2 prepared by electrolysis of MnSO4 and MxSO4 (where M = Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+ or Mg2+) in aqueous solutions at various pH and voltage Ev values under ambient conditions have been systematically studied. The structures of powdery MnO2 produced are found to depend on the radius of the Mz+ counter cation in addition to the pH and Ev conditions. In order to achieve the α-phase for MnO2 formation under neutral pH condition, the radius of counter cation must be equal to or greater than 1.41 A?, the size of the K+ cation. The relative concentration ratio of [MnO4-]transient/[Mn2+], which is related to the pH-Ev conditions, also affects the structure of MnO2 produced with counter ions smaller than K+. For samples prepared in acidified solution with the counter ions of Li+, Na+ or Mg2+ at 2.2 V, the electrolysis products display the γ-MnO2 phase while those prepared at 2.8 V electrolysis produce a mixture of γ-MnO2 and α-MnO2 phases. Single phase of α-MnO2 is identified in the 5 V electrolysis products. Furthermore, the valence state of manganese was found to decrease as the applied voltage was reduced from 5.0 to 2.2 V. This implies that the lower [MnO4-]transient/[Mn2+] ratio or the less oxidative condition is responsible for the non-stoichiometric MnO2 structure with oxygen deficiency.

MnO2-coated Ni nanorods: Enhanced high rate behavior in pseudo-capacitive supercapacitor

Lei,Daffos,Taberna,Simon,Favier

, p. 7454 - 7459 (2010)

Ni nanorods prepared by electrochemical growth through an anodized aluminium oxide membrane were used as substrate for the electrodeposition of MnO2 either in potentiostatic mode or by a pulsed method. Electrochemical deposition parameters were chosen for an homogeneous deposit onto Ni nanorods. Resulting Ni supported MnO2 electrodes were tested for electrochemical performances as nanostructured negative electrodes for supercapacitors. They exhibited initial capacitances up to 190 F/g and remarkable performances at high charge/discharge rates.

Moore, T. E.,Ellis, M.,Selwood, P. W.

, p. 856 - 866 (1950)

Photocurrent generation from semiconducting manganese oxide nanosheets in response to visible light

Sakai, Nobuyuki,Ebina, Yasuo,Takada, Kazunori,Sasaki, Takayoshi

, p. 9651 - 9655 (2005)

Unilamellar nanosheet crystallites of manganese oxide generated the anodic photocurrent under visible light irradiation (?? a??0.5 nm may facilitate the charge separation of excited electrons and holes, which is generally very difficult for strongly localized d-d transitions. The monolayer film of MnO2 nanosheets exhibited the incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency of 0.16% in response to the monochromatic light irradiation (?? = 400 nm), which is comparable to those for sensitization of monolayer dyes adsorbed on a flat single-crystal surface. The efficiency declined with increasing the layer number of MnO2 nanosheets, although the optical absorption was enhanced. The recombination of the excited electron-hole pairs may become dominant when the carriers need to migrate a longer distance than 1 layer through multilayered nanosheets. ? 2005 American Chemical Society.

Udupa, M. R.

, p. 245 - 248 (1981)

Oxidative Cleavage of S–S Bond During the Reduction of Tris(pyridine-2-carboxylato)manganese(III) by Dithionite in Sodium Picolinate–Picolinic Acid Buffer Medium

Sen Gupta, Kalyan K.,Bhattacharjee, Nandini,Pal, Biswajit

, p. 635 - 643 (2016)

The reduction of tris(pyridine-2-carboxylato)manganese(III) by dithionite has been investigated within the temperature window 288–303 K and at pH range 5.22–6.10 in sodium picolinate–picolinic acid buffer medium. The reaction obeys the following stoichiometry: S2O2- 4 + 2MnIII + 2H2O → 2HSO- 3 + 2MnII + 2H+ The reaction is described in terms of a mechanism that involves an initial complex formation between S2O4 2? and [MnIII(C5H4NCO2)3] followed by S–S bond cleavage to give 2HSO3 ? and [MnII(C5H4NCO2)2(H2O)2] as the products via the formation of SO2 ●? radical anion. Kinetics and spectrophotometric evidences are cited in favor of the suggested mechanism. Thermodynamic parameters associated with the equilibrium step and the activation parameters with the rate-determining step have been computed.

Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, thermal, and photostability studies of 2-(2′-hydroxy-5′-phenyl)-5-aminobenzotriazole complexes

Refat, Moamen S.

, p. 1095 - 1103 (2010)

Three Mn(II), Co(II), and Cu(II) new transition metal complexes of the fluorescence dye: 2-(2′-hydroxy-5′-phenyl)-5-aminobenzotriazole/PBT derived from o-aminophenol and m-phenylenediamine have been synthesized. The structural interpretations were confirmed from elemental analyses, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductivity, as well as from mass, IR, UV-Vis spectral studies. From the analytical, spectroscopic, and thermal data, the stoichiometry of the mentioned complexes was found to be 1:2 (metal:ligand). The molar conductance data revealed that all the metal chelates are non-electrolytes and the chloride ions exist inside the coordination sphere. The thermal stabilities of these complexes were studied by thermogravimetric (TG/DTG) and the decomposition steps of these three complexes are investigated. The kinetic parameters such as the energy of activation (E*), pre-exponential factor (A), activation entropy (ΔS*), activation enthalpy (ΔH*), and free energy of activation (ΔG*) have been reported. Photostability of phenyl benzotriazole as fluorescence dye and their metal complexes doped in polymethyl methacrylate/PMMA were exposed to UV-Vis radiation and the change in the absorption spectra was achieved at different times during irradiation period.

Synthesis, Crystal Structures, Reactivity, and Magnetochemistry of a Series of Binuclear Complexes of Manganese(II), -(III), and -(IV) of Biological Relevance. The Crystal Structure of IV(μ-O)3MnIVL'>(PF6)2*H2O Containing an Unprecedented Short Mn...Mn Distance of 2.296 Angs...

Wieghardt, Karl,Bossek, Ursula,Nuber, Bernhard,Weiss, Johannes,Bonvoisin, J.,et al.

, p. 7398 - 7411 (1988)

The disproportionation reactions of two binuclear complexes of manganese(III) containing the oxo-bis(acetato)dimanganese(III) core and two 1,4,7-triazacyclononane (L) capping ligands (1) or two N,N',N''-trimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (L') ligands (2) in aqueous solution under anaerobic conditions lead to a variety of novel binuclear MnIIIMnIV and MnIV2 dimers.These are the following: IIIMnIV(μ-O)2(μ-CH3CO2)>2*CH3CN (5); IIIMnIV(μ-O)(μ-CH3CO2)2>(ClO4)3 (6); IV2(OH)2(μ-O)2>II3(C2O4)4(OH2)2>*6H2O (7); and IV2(μ-O)3>(PF6)2*H2O (9).A tetranuclear species IV4O6>Br4*5.5H2O (8) is generated as a thermodynamically very stable product from a MnII containing aqueous solution of L in the presence of oxygen.In the absence of oxygen methanolic solutions of Mn(ClO4)2*2H2O or manganese(II) acetate react with L' to form II2(μ-OH)(μ-CH3CO2)2>(ClO4) (3) and II2(μ-CH3CO2)3> (4).The oxo- and acetato-bridges in 1 and 2 are labile; addition of anions X- (X=Cl, Br, NCS, N3) to acetonitrile solutions of 1 or 2 yields the monomers LMnX3 and L'MnX3.The electrochemistry of all compounds has been investigated; for example, 2 is reversibly oxidized by two one-electron processes to generate MnIIIMnIV and MnIV2 dimers in liquid SO2.The crystal structures of 4, 7, 8, and 9 have been determined by X-ray crystallography: 4, orthorhombic Pcab, a = 17.368(5) Angstroem, b = 17.538(5) Angstroem, c = 33.21(1) Angstroem, Z = 8; 7, monoclinic C2/c, a = 13.391(3) Angstroem, b = 16.571(4) Angstroem, c = 19.312(4) Angstroem, β = 109.82(2) degree, Z = 4; 8, monoclinic P21/c, a = 17.548(8) Angstroem, b = 13.118(7) Angstroem, c = 212.56(1) Angstroem, β = 105.63(4) degree, Z = 4; 9, orthorhombic Pnma, a = 10.057(5) Angstroem, b = 16.12(1) Angstroem, c = 19.237(8) Angstroem, Z = 4. 9 consists of the cofacial bioctahedral cation IV(μ-O)3MnIVL'>2+ and PF6 anions.The Mn...Mn distance is unusually short (2.296(2) Angstroem).Bulk magnetic properties of all compouds have been studied between 100 and 298 K, and in some instances 4 and 298 K.In 2 the MnIII ions are ferromagnetically coupled, J = +18(1) cm-1; whereas the MnII centers in 4 are weakly antiferromagnetically coupled, J = -3.5(2) cm-1.Very strong intramolecular antiferromagnetic coupling is observed in 9 (J = -780 cm-1).

Bifunctional pyrimidine-amino-acid ligands: Solution study and crystal structure of a Mn(II) chain alternating six- and sevenfold coordination environments

López-Garzón,Arranz-Mascarós,Godino-Salido,Gutiérrez-Valero,Cuesta,Moreno

, p. 41 - 48 (2003)

The acid-base characterization in aqueous solution of the N-2-[4-amino-1,6-dihydro-1-methyl-5-nitroso-6-oxopyrimidinyl)methionine, a member of a family of bifunctional N-pyrimidine α-amino acids ligands, has been carried out by potentiometric and UV-Vis techniques in the 2.5-9.0 pH range, indicating a quasi-zwitterionic structure. The solution study of the HL/Mn(II) system at 1:2, 2:1 and 4:1 molar ratios (25°C and pHA solid complex with MnL2·612H2O stoichiometry was isolated from an aqueous 1:3 [HL]/[Mn(II)] mixture at pH 6. The X-ray single-crystal characterization has revealed that this complex can be formulated as {[Mn(H 2O)4(μ-L)2Mn(L)2(H 2O)]·8H2O}n, an infinite chain in which two different Mn(II) ions having six- and sevenfold coordination environments alternate along the chain. The asymmetric unit contains two ligands coordinating in different fashion. One of these coordinates monodentately through the oxygen atom belonging to the exocyclic nitroso group while the other exhibits a 3η-bridging pattern between the six- and sevenfold Mn(II) arrangements. The versatile coordination modes of this ligand is discussed and compared to other complexes of this bifunctional family of ligands.

Cathodic behavior of alkali manganese oxides from permanganate

Chen, Rongji,Whittingham, M. Stanley

, p. L64-L67 (1997)

The reaction of potassium, sodium, and lithium permanganate in water at 170°C leads directly to potassium, sodium, and lithium manganese dioxides, AyMnO · nH2O, with a R3m rhombohedral structure. These crystalline layered structures after dehydration readily and reversibly react with lithium through an intercalation mechanism. The capacity for lithium is a function of the alkali ion present, and the larger potassium ion maintains the capacity best. For lithium there is a tendency to convert to the spinel structure which leads to loss of capacity.

Euler, Karl-Joachim,Kirchhof, Robert

, p. 1383 - 1388 (1981)

Enhanced anode performance of manganese oxides with petal-like microsphere structures by optimizing the sintering conditions

Yu, Wei,Jiang, Xiaojian,Meng, Fanhui,Zhang, Zhonghua,Ma, Houyi,Liu, Xizheng

, p. 34501 - 34506 (2016)

Herein, the rational design and synthesis of manganese oxides (MnO2 and MnO) have been achieved and both of them show petal-like microsphere structures. As anodes for LIBs, MnO exhibits a higher capacity of 751.4 mA h g-1 after 400 cycles (492.7 mA h g-1 for MnO2 after 300 cycles) at 2000 mA g-1.

Incorporation of impurity metal ions in electrolytic manganese dioxide

Tamura,Ishizeki,Nagayama,Furuichi

, p. 2035 - 2040 (1994)

The amounts of impurity metal ions incorporated into electrolytic manganese dioxide (EMD) during its preparation were measured as a function of metal ion concentrations and current densities. The amount of incorporated ions increased in proportion to the concentration in solution, and at a fixed concentration it was different from ion to ion: Ni2+2+2+2+3+ 2+. The specific surface area of the formed EMD was larger for impurity ions with higher incorporation affinity. Further, the adsorption of ions on the surface of a ready-made manganese dioxide sample (IC12) was examined, and modeling of the adsorption behavior was attempted. The amounts of adsorbed ions at a fixed concentration in solution and pH 0.7 (where EMD is produced) were obtained by the ion-adsorption model. There was a strong correlation between the amount incorporated and the amount of adsorption, suggesting a mechanism in which EMD is contaminated through adsorption on its new growing surface. The increase in specific surface area of EMD with contaminants was interpreted to be due to a suppression of the growth of EMD at the adsorbed foreign ion sites, resulting in EMD with many defects or smaller particle sizes. The opposite effect of current density on incorporation for the two groups of metal ions was discussed.

Power loss and energy density of the asymmetric ultracapacitor loaded with molybdenum doped manganese oxide

Wang, Yue-Sheng,Tsai, Dah-Shyang,Chung, Wen-Hung,Syu, Yong-Sin,Huang, Ying-Sheng

, p. 95 - 102 (2012)

Ultracapacitors of asymmetric configuration have been prepared with activated carbon (AC) and undoped or Mo-doped manganese oxide (MnO2) in 1.0 M Na2SO4 electrolyte. Phase analysis shows the AC powder, 1-15 μm in size, contains both disordered and graphitic structures, and the undoped and Mo-doped oxide powder, 0.05-0.20 μm in particle size, mainly involves amorphous MnO2 and MoO2. CV results indicate the single electrode of AC plus 10 wt% Mo-doped MnO2 (A9OM1) is superior to the electrode with undoped MnO2 or high content of doped MnO2, exhibiting features of double layer capacitance at high scan rate and pseudocapacitance characteristics at low scan rate. When assembled with a negative electrode of AC, the capacitor of positive A9OM1 electrode demonstrates the least power loss among three asymmetric capacitors. This asymmetric capacitor also shows a higher capacitance than the symmetric AC capacitor when the current density is less than 8.0 A g-1 in 1.8 V potential window. But a higher electrode resistance of A9OM1, in contrast with AC, compromises its capacitance plus. When the energy density of A9OM1 asymmetric capacitor is compared with that of symmetric AC capacitor at the same power level, the capacitance benefit on energy density is restricted to current density ≤ 3.0 A g-1.

One-step synthesis of hollow urchin-like Ag2Mn8O16 for long-life Li-O2 battery

Ci, Lijie,Dai, Linna,Guo, Huanhuan,Li, Deping,Li, Jianwei,Liao, Jialin,Lu, Jingyu,Nie, Xiangkun,Sun, Qing,Xiao, Shenyi,Yao, Yuqing

, (2021/10/12)

To solve the critical issues like high polarization and unstable cycle ability, it is vital to design low-cost, stable and efficient catalytic cathode material for nonaqueous Li-O2 batteries (LOBs). Herein, a hollow urchin-like hollandite Ag2Mn8O16 electrocatalyst is fabricated by one-step hydrothermal method. The mixed bimetallic oxide with diverse valences (Mn3+ and Mn4+) and active oxygen defects provide sufficient active sites, and Ag[sbnd]Mn[sbnd]O bonds accelerate charge transformation. LOBs with the well-designed porous Ag2Mn8O16 cathode show superior electrochemical performances in LOBs, including ultrahigh specific capacity (7912 mAh gc?1 at 100 mA gc?1), good rate performance (5076 mAh gc?1 at 250 mA gc?1, 64.16%) and long-term cycle stability (320 cycles at 100 mA gc?1 within a limited capacity of 250 mAh gc?1 and 133 cycles at 200 mA gc?1 within a limited capacity of 500 mAh gc?1). This work provides a positive effect on designing better catalytic cathode materials for LOBs and push forward the commercialization progress.

High-Energy-Density Magnesium-Air Battery Based on Dual-Layer Gel Electrolyte

Chen, Hao,Gao, Rui,He, Er,Jiao, Yiding,Li, Luhe,Lu, Jiang,Peng, Huisheng,Wang, Jiacheng,Wang, Lie,Ye, Tingting,Zhang, Ye

supporting information, p. 15317 - 15322 (2021/06/14)

Mg-air batteries are explored as the next-generation power systems for wearable and implantable electronics as they could work stably in neutral electrolytes and are also biocompatible. However, high corrosion rate and low utilization of Mg anode largely impair the performance of Mg-air battery with low discharge voltage, poor specific capacity and low energy density. Here, to the best of our knowledge, we first report a dual-layer gel electrolyte to simultaneously solve the above two problems by preventing the corrosion of Mg anode and the production of dense passive layer, respectively. The resulting Mg-air batteries produced an average specific capacity of 2190 mAh g?1 based on the total Mg anode (99.3 % utilization rate of Mg anode) and energy density of 2282 Wh kg?1 based on the total anode and air electrode, both of which are the highest among the reported Mg-air batteries. Besides, our Mg-air batteries could be made into a fiber shape, and they were flexible to work stably under various deformations such as bending and twisting.

Effect of Manganese Valence on Specific Capacitance in Supercapacitors of Manganese Oxide Microspheres

Chen, Xing,Li, Lei,Wang, Xiaoli,Xie, Kun,Wang, Yuqiao

, p. 9152 - 9159 (2021/05/17)

Manganese oxides have attracted great interest in electrochemical energy storage due to high theoretical specific capacitance and abundant valence states. The multiple valence states in the redox reactions are beneficial for enhancing the electrochemical properties. Herein, three manganese microspheres were prepared by a one-pot hydrothermal method and subsequent calcination at different temperatures using carbon spheres as templates. The trivalent manganese of Mn2O3 exhibited multiple redox transitions of Mn3+/Mn2+ and Mn4+/Mn3+ during the intercalation/deintercalation of electrolyte ions. The possible redox reactions of Mn2O3 were proposed based on the cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammogram results. Mn2O3 microsphere integrated the advantages of multiple redox couples and unique structure, demonstrating a high specific capacitance and long cycling stability. The symmetric Mn2O3//Mn2O3 device yielded a maximum energy density of 29.3 Wh kg?1 at 250 W kg?1.

Post a RFQ

Enter 15 to 2000 letters.Word count: 0 letters

Attach files(File Format: Jpeg, Jpg, Gif, Png, PDF, PPT, Zip, Rar,Word or Excel Maximum File Size: 3MB)

1

What can I do for you?
Get Best Price

Get Best Price for 1313-13-9