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Cas Database

10016-20-3

10016-20-3

Identification

  • Product Name:Cyclohexapentylose

  • CAS Number: 10016-20-3

  • EINECS:233-007-4

  • Molecular Weight:972.854

  • Molecular Formula: C36H60O30

  • HS Code:29400090

  • Mol File:10016-20-3.mol

Synonyms:Cyclomaltohexose;Dextrin, a-cyclo;Dexy Pearl a-100;Isoeleat K 50;NSC 269470;Ringdex A;Stereoisomer of 5,10,15,20,25,30-hexakis(hydroxymethyl)-2,4,7,9,12,14,17,19,22,24,27,29-dodecaoxaheptacyclo[26.2.2.23,6.28,11.213,16.218,21.223,26]dotetracontane-31,32,33,34,35,36,37,38,39,40,41,42-dodecol;a-Cycloamylose;a-Dextrin;a-Schardinger dextrin;Cyclohexaamylose(6CI);Alfadex;Cavamax W 6;Cavamax W 6 Food;Celdex A 100;Cyclohexadextrin;

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Safety information and MSDS view more

  • Pictogram(s):IrritantXi

  • Hazard Codes:Xi

  • Signal Word:No signal word.

  • Hazard Statement:none

  • First-aid measures: General adviceConsult a physician. Show this safety data sheet to the doctor in attendance.If inhaled If breathed in, move person into fresh air. If not breathing, give artificial respiration. Consult a physician. In case of skin contact Wash off with soap and plenty of water. Consult a physician. In case of eye contact Rinse thoroughly with plenty of water for at least 15 minutes and consult a physician. If swallowed Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious person. Rinse mouth with water. Consult a physician. SYMPTOMS: A symptom of exposure to this chemical is irritation. ACUTE/CHRONIC HAZARDS: This compound may be harmful by inhalation, ingestion, or skin absorption. It may cause irritation. When heated to decomposition this compound emits toxic fumes of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide.

  • Fire-fighting measures: Suitable extinguishing media Fires involving this material can be controlled with a dry chemical, carbon dioxide or Halon extinguisher. Flash point data for this chemical are not available; however, it is probably combustible. Wear self-contained breathing apparatus for firefighting if necessary.

  • Accidental release measures: Use personal protective equipment. Avoid dust formation. Avoid breathing vapours, mist or gas. Ensure adequate ventilation. Evacuate personnel to safe areas. Avoid breathing dust. For personal protection see section 8. Prevent further leakage or spillage if safe to do so. Do not let product enter drains. Discharge into the environment must be avoided. Pick up and arrange disposal. Sweep up and shovel. Keep in suitable, closed containers for disposal.

  • Handling and storage: Avoid contact with skin and eyes. Avoid formation of dust and aerosols. Avoid exposure - obtain special instructions before use.Provide appropriate exhaust ventilation at places where dust is formed. For precautions see section 2.2. Store in cool place. Keep container tightly closed in a dry and well-ventilated place.

  • Exposure controls/personal protection:Occupational Exposure limit valuesBiological limit values Handle in accordance with good industrial hygiene and safety practice. Wash hands before breaks and at the end of workday. Eye/face protection Safety glasses with side-shields conforming to EN166. Use equipment for eye protection tested and approved under appropriate government standards such as NIOSH (US) or EN 166(EU). Skin protection Wear impervious clothing. The type of protective equipment must be selected according to the concentration and amount of the dangerous substance at the specific workplace. Handle with gloves. Gloves must be inspected prior to use. Use proper glove removal technique(without touching glove's outer surface) to avoid skin contact with this product. Dispose of contaminated gloves after use in accordance with applicable laws and good laboratory practices. Wash and dry hands. The selected protective gloves have to satisfy the specifications of EU Directive 89/686/EEC and the standard EN 374 derived from it. Respiratory protection Wear dust mask when handling large quantities. Thermal hazards

Supplier and reference price

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  • Manufacture/Brand:Usbiological
  • Product Description:Cyclomaltohexaose
  • Packaging:100g
  • Price:$ 472
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  • Manufacture/Brand:TRC
  • Product Description:α-Cyclodextrin
  • Packaging:25g
  • Price:$ 240
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  • Manufacture/Brand:TCI Chemical
  • Product Description:Alpha Cyclodextrin >98.0%(HPLC)
  • Packaging:10g
  • Price:$ 62
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  • Manufacture/Brand:TCI Chemical
  • Product Description:Alpha Cyclodextrin >98.0%(HPLC)
  • Packaging:100g
  • Price:$ 314
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  • Manufacture/Brand:TCI Chemical
  • Product Description:Alpha Cyclodextrin >98.0%(HPLC)
  • Packaging:25g
  • Price:$ 124
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  • Manufacture/Brand:Sigma-Aldrich
  • Product Description:Alfadex European Pharmacopoeia (EP) Reference Standard
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  • Price:$ 190
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  • Manufacture/Brand:Sigma-Aldrich
  • Product Description:Alfadex European Pharmacopoeia (EP) Reference Standard
  • Packaging:a1225000
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  • Manufacture/Brand:Sigma-Aldrich
  • Product Description:Alpha Cyclodextrin
  • Packaging:1G
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  • Manufacture/Brand:Sigma-Aldrich
  • Product Description:α-Cyclodextrin ≥98%
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  • Manufacture/Brand:Sigma-Aldrich
  • Product Description:α-Cyclodextrin purum, ≥98.0% (HPLC)
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Relevant articles and documentsAll total 38 Articles be found

NMR Detection of Simultaneous Formation of [2]- and [3]Pseudorotaxanes in Aqueous Solution between α-Cyclodextrin and Linear Aliphatic α,ω-Amino acids, an α,ω-Diamine and an α,ω-Diacid of Similar Length, and Comparison with the Solid-State Structures

Eliadou, Kyriaki,Yannakopoulou, Konstantina,Rontoyianni, Aliki,Mavridis, Irene M.

, p. 6217 - 6226 (1999)

The interactions of 11-aminoundecanoic acid (1), 12-aminododecanoic acid (2), 1,12-diaminododecane (3), and 1,13-tridecanoic diacid (4) with α-cyclodextrin (αCD) were studied in aqueous solution by NMR spectroscopy. The association modes were established with titration and continuous variation plots, variable temperature NMR spectra, and dipolar interactions as recorded in 2D ROESY spectra. The studies were carried out at pH 7.3 and 13.6. These long, linear bifunctional molecules were found to form simultaneously [2]- and [3]pseudorotaxanes with αCD in the aqueous solution. At the higher pH the 1:1 adducts were present at concentrations higher than at the neutral pH. The longer guests formed complexes enriched in the 2:1 constituent at both pH values. There were clear indications that the [2]pseudorotaxanes are present in two isomeric forms. The presence of isomers also in the [3]pseudorotaxanes was not ruled out. Various exchange rate regimes were observed; clearly in neutral solutions the formation of the 1:1 complexes was fast in the NMR time scale, whereas the threading of a second αCD ring was a slower process. In the solid state, the adduct of αCD/2 had the structure of a [3]pseudorotaxane, in accordance with previously solved crystal structures of αCD/3 and βCD/4. The species in solution, in contrast with those present in the solid state, are therefore of varying nature, and thus the frequently and conveniently assumed 1:1 stoichiometry in similar systems is an oversimplification of the real situation.

Solid state polycondensation within cyclodextrin channels leading to watersoluble polyamide rotaxanes

Wenz, Gerhard,Steinbrunn, Marc Boris,Landfester, Katharina

, p. 15575 - 15592 (1997)

α,ω-Aminocarboxylic acids form microcrystalline inclusion compounds with α-cyclodextrin. In these inclusion compounds cyclodextrins build up channel structures, in which the α,ω-aminocarboxylic acids can be polycondensed at 200-240°C. As the resulting pol

Thermodynamic and nuclear magnetic resonance study of the reactions of α- and β-cyclodextrin with acids, aliphatic amines, and cyclic alcohols

Rekharsky, Mikhail V.,Mayhew, Martin P.,Goldberg, Robert N.,Ross, Philip D.,Yamashoji, Yuko,Inoue, Yoshihisa

, p. 87 - 100 (1997)

Titration calorimetry was used to determine equilibrium constants and standard molar enthalpy, Gibbs energy, and entropy changes for the reactions of a series of acids, amines, and cyclic alcohols with α- and β-cyclodextrin. The results have been examined in terms of structural features in the ligands such as the number of alkyl groups, the charge number, the presence of a double bond, branching, and the presence of methyl and methoxy groups. The values of thermodynamic quantities, in particular the standard molar Gibbs energy, correlate well with the structural features in the ligands. These structural correlations can be used for the estimation of thermodynamic quantities for related reactions. Enthalpy-entropy compensation is evident when the individual classes of substances studied herein are considered, but does not hold when these various classes of ligands are considered collectively. The NMR results indicate that the mode of accommodation of the acids and amines in the α-cyclodextrin cavity is very similar, but that the 1-methyl groups in 1-methylhexylamine and in 1-methylheptylamine and the N-methyl group in N-methylhexylamine lie outside the α-cyclodextrin cavity. This latter finding is consistent with the calorimetric results. Many of the thermodynamic and NMR results can be qualitatively understood in terms of van der Waals forces and hydrophobic effects.

Kinetics of the self-assembly of α-cyclodextrin [2]pseudorotaxanes with 1,12-bis(4-(α-alkyl-α-methylmethanol)pyridinium)dodecane dications in aqueous solution

Smith, A. Catherine,Macartney, Donal H.

, p. 9243 - 9251 (1998)

The kinetics and thermodynamics of the self-assembly of a series of [2]pseudorotaxanes comprised of α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) and racemic 1,12- bis(4-(α-alkyl-α-methylmethanol)pyridinium)dodecane dications (L(CH2)12L2+) in aqueous solutions have been investigated using 1H NMR spectroscopy. The mechanism of assembly involves inclusion of the α-methyl- α-alkylmethanol substituent groups (-C(CH3)(OH)R, where R = Me, Et, Pr, Bu, allyl, and 4-butenyl) by α-CD, followed by a rate-determining passage of the cyclodextrin over the pyridinium group onto the dodecamethylene chain. Dicationic threads containing end groups with R = Ph or i-Pr or where L = 4- (α,α-diethylmethanol)-pyridinium did not form α-cyclodextrin pseudorotaxanes, even after prolonged heating. The trends in the rate and activation parameters may be related to the size, shape, and hydrophobicity of the alkyl substituents and are compared with several other systems from the literature. An increase in the length and hydrophobicity of the alkyl group increases the strength of end group inclusion and decreases the rate of threading. In addition, the presence of unsaturation in the alkyl substituent (allyl vs propyl and 4-butenyl vs butyl) results in an increase in the threading rate constant.

Volume Change on Complex Formation Between Anions and Cyclodextrins in Aqueous Solution

Hoeiland, H.,Hald, L.H.,Kvammen, O.J.

, p. 775 - 784 (1981)

Partial molal volume changes during complex formation between SCN(1-), I(1-), and ClO4(1-) and α- and β-cyclodextrin have been determined by two independent methods of measurements; one based on density measurement and subsequent calculation of apparent molal volumes, the other on differentiating the association constants with respect to pressure.Results from the two methods are in good agreement.Negative volume changes were observed for complex formation between the anions and α-cyclodextrin while zero or slightly positive values were observed for complex formation with β-cyclodextrin.The result is consistent with the idea that the anions do not become dehydrated as they form complexes with cyclodextrins.

Retardation of acetal hydrolysis by cyclodextrins and its use in probing cyclodextrin-guest binding

Tee, Oswald S.,Fedortchenko, Alexei A.,Soo, Patrick Lim

, p. 123 - 128 (1998)

Hydrolysis of benzaldehyde dimethyl acetal 1 in aqueous acid is slowed down greatly by cyclodextrins (SDs): α-CD, β-CD, hp-β-CD (hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin) and γ-CD. The variations of the observed first-order rate constants (Kobs) with [CD] exhibit saturation behaviour consistent with 1:1 binding between 1 and the CDs. In the case of β-CD and hp-β-CD, the binding is relatively strong and the CD-bound acetal is unreactive. In contrast, binding of the acetal by α-CD and γ-CD is much weaker, but only with α-CD does the CD-bound form show significant reactivity. The four CD-mediated reaction, have been evaluated as probe reactions for determining dissociation constants of {CD-'guest'} complexes. In this approach, added guests attenuate the retarding effect of CD-substrate binding and cause an increase in the rate of acetal hydrolysis. The method works well for alipharic alcohols and ketones binding to β-CD and hp-β-CD, but it is less successful with α-CD because of the shallow dependence of kobs on [α-CD] in the probe action. With γ-CD, the approach is not applicable at all, because added guests cause a further reduction in the rate of acetal hydrolysis, not an increase. Various implications of these findings are discussed.

Catalysis of ester aminolysis by cyclodextrins. The reaction of alkylamines with p-nitrophenyl alkanoates

Gadosy,Boyd,Tee

, p. 6879 - 6889 (2000)

The effects of four cyclodextrins (α-CD, β-CD, hydroxypropyl-β-CD, and γ-CD) on the aminolysis of p-nitrophenyl alkanoates (acetate to heptanoate) by primary amines (n-propyl to n-octyl, isobutyl, isopentyl, cyclopentyl, cyclohexyl, benzyl) in aqueous solution have been investigated. Rate constants for amine attack on the free and CD-bound esters (k(N) and k(cN)) have ratios (k(cN)/k(N)) varying from 0.08 (retardation) to 180 (catalysis). For the kinetically equivalent process of free ester reacting with CD-bound amine (k(Nc)), the ratios k(Nc)/k(N) vary from 0.2 to 28. Either way, there is evidence of catalysis in some cases and retardation in others. Changes in reactivity parameters with structure indicate more than one mode of transition state binding to the CDs. Short esters react with short alkylamines by attack of free amine on the ester bound by its aryl group, but for longer amines, free ester reacts with CD-bound amine. Reaction of long esters with long amines, which is catalyzed by β-CD and γ-CD, involves inclusion of the alkylamino group and possibly the ester acyl group. The larger cavity of γ-CD may allow the inclusion of the ester aryl group, as well as the alkylamino group, in the transition state. Reaction between an ester bound to the CD by its acyl group and free amine appears not to be important.

Altered product specificity of a cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase by molecular imprinting with cyclomaltododecaose

Kaulpiboon, Jarunee,Pongsawasdi, Piamsook,Zimmermann, Wolfgang

, p. 480 - 485 (2010)

Cyclodextrin glycosyltransferases (CGTases), members of glycoside hydrolase family 13, catalyze the conversion of amylose to cyclodextrins (CDs), circular α-(1,4)-linked glucopyranose oligosaccharides of different ring sizes. The CD containing 12 α-D-gluc

Induced circular dichroism and UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy of cyclodextrin inclusion complexes: Structural elucidation of supramolecular azi-adamantane

Krois, Daniel,Brinker, Udo H.

, p. 11627 - 11632 (1998)

The first induced circular dichroism (ICD) analyses of diazirineγyciodextrin inclusion complexes are reported. The stoichiometries and association constants of the guestηost complexes with α-, β-, and γ- cyclodextrin were determined. In addition, with the α-cyclodextrin complex, UV-vis spectroscopy of water-ethanol solutions showed remarkable fine structure, probably indicating that the diazirine experiences a nonpolar microenvironment. These analytical methods provide details about the architecture and nature of these supramolecular carbene precursors.

Cyclodextrin Inclusion Complexes of 1-Pyrenebutyrate: The Role of Coinclusion of Amphiphiles

Herkstroeter, William G.,Martic, Peter A.,Evans, Ted R.,Farid, Samir

, p. 3275 - 3280 (1986)

Several inclusion complexes with various stoichiometries are formed from 1-pyrenebutyrate ion (P) and the different cyclodextrins (α-, β-, and γ-CD).With α- and β-CD, the initially formed 1:1 complexes lead to the formation of 1:2 complexes (P*α2 and P*β2).As P can be only partially included in the small cavity of α-CD, the equilibrium constants for the formation of both complexes of α-CD are about an order of magnitude smaller than those of β-CD.For the same reason, P*β2, to which we assign a "barrel" configuration, is also an order of magnitude more effective than P*α2 in protecting singlet-excited P against quenching by triethanolamine.We had shown earlier that with γ-CD the 1:1 complex (P*γ) dimerizes to a 2:2 complex (P2*γ2), to which we also assigned a barrel configuration.The lack of efficient 1:2 complex formation in this case is attributed to the large size of the "barrel" enclosed by two γ-CD molecules.The extra space next to a single P molecule in such a cavity would have to be filled with water.However, the formation of a 1:2 inclusion complex between P and γ-CD can be induced by the coinclusion of a molecule with a hydrophobic moiety such as sodium hexanesulfonate (X).This replaces the water within the cavity and leads to the formation of P*X*γ2.This complex provides the highest degree of protection against quenching of excited P in these inclusion complexes.

ENZYMATIC SYNTHESIS OF CYCLODEXTRINS WITH α-GLUCOSYLFLUORIDE AS A SUBSTRATE FOR CYCLODEXTRIN-α(1->4)GLUCOSYLTRANSFERASE

Treder, Wolfgang,Thiem, Joachim,Schlingmann, Merten

, p. 5605 - 5608 (1986)

By use of immobilized cyclodextrin-α(1->4)glucosyltransferase α-glucosylfluoride is transformed in high yield predominantly into cyclodextrins and maltooligomers as side products.

Inclusion Complexes of Alcohols with α-Cyclodextrin

Spencer, J. N.,DeGarmo, Jarusha,Paul, I. M.,He, Qing,Ke, Xiaoming,et al.

, p. 601 - 610 (1995)

Calorimetric studies of the inclusion complexes of straight and branched alcohols and of diols with alpha-cyclodextrin (α-CD) have been carried out in water solvent.The data suggest that straight and branched chain alcohols enter the cavity of α-CD alkyl

Suitability and limitations of methods for characterisation of activity of malto-oligosaccharide-forming amylases

Duedahl-Olesen, Lene,Haastrup Pedersen, Lars,Lambertsen Larsen, Kim

, p. 109 - 119 (2000)

The suitability and limitations of essential methods and reference substrates used for characterisation of activity of amylolytic enzymes is investigated. Saccharogenic, chromogenic and chromatographic methods are included. The results are discussed in relation to the measurement of reaction rates, determination of action mode and product specificity and the impact on identification and nomenclature of malto-oligosaccharide-forming amylases. An accurate determination of reaction rates using the saccharogenic methods strongly depends on the degree of polymerisation (DP) of the standards used and the hydrolysis products formed by the amylase. Particularly the use of glucose as standard can lead to overestimates due to the differences in the reducing potential of glucose and malto-oligosaccharides. The reliability of the chromogenic methods for determination of action mode depends on the DP of the substrate and the specificity of the amylase. For a characterisation of the starch hydrolysis products and the variation in the DP during hydrolysis, high performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection provided a fast and reliable method. A literature survey revealed varying and inconsistent use of nomenclature of malto-oligosaccharide forming amylases. Therefore a systematic approach identifying three main classes of activity is suggested using not only the mode of action and the DP of the major product but also the stage of hydrolysis at which this product is formed. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd.

Photochemistry of Benzophenone-Cyclodextrin Inclusion Complexes

Monti, Sandra,Flamigni, Lucia,Martelli, Alessandro,Bortolus, Pietro

, p. 4447 - 4451 (1988)

The photochemistry of benzophenone aqueous solutions in the presence of cyclodextrins (CDx) has been studied by stationary and pulsed techniques.Quenching of the phosphorescence is the consequence of hydrogen abstraction following the inclusion in the cyclodextrin cavity of the triplet benzophenone.The H-abstraction process has close analogies with the same reaction in micelles.Radical pair decay is controlled by the dimensions of the CDx cavity: intersystem crossing prevails in the presence of β-CDx, radical excit in the presence of α- and γ-CDx.The fate of the escaped radical also depends on the cavity dimensions, as revealed by the photoreduction quantum yields.

Spectroscopic Studies on Exchange Properties in Through-Ring Cyclodextrin Complexes of Carbazole-Viologen Linked Compounds: Effects of Spacer Chain Length

Yonemura, Hiroaki,Kasahara, Motohiro,Saito, Hide,Nakamura, Hiroshi,Matsuo, Taku

, p. 5765 - 5770 (1992)

Analysis of 1H NMR spectra (400 MHz) revealed a novel mode of interaction between cyclodextrin (CD) and carbazole-viologen linked compounds (CACnV), where the spacer chain was consisted of n methylene units (n = 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12).In the case of α-CD, the complexed species lived long enough to afford distinct proton signals, when the spacer chain was relatively long (n >/= 8).As to CAC12V, the equilibrium constant for the 1:1 complex was 4.9 * 104 M-1 at 30 deg C and coalescence temperatures for the proton signals exceeded 100 deg C.Clear NOEs were observedto prove strong interaction between the protons in the CD cavity and the spacer methylene groups of CAC12V.The spacer was concluded to be encased in the cavity of α-CD.In the case of β-CD, essentially the same "through-ring CD complex" was formed.The line shape analysis indicated that the free energies of activation at 70 deg C for complexation and decomplexation were 11.6 and 17.2 kcal/mol, respectively.Activation parameters for the α-CD complexes were evaluated by the rate of disappearance of intramolecular charge-transfer absorption (420 nm) on the addition of α-CD.The free energy of activation for decomplexation was found to exceed 22 kcal/mol in the α-CD complexes for CACnV (n = 8, 10, and 12).The viologen moiety of CACnV was concluded to be the site of entrance for forming "through-ring CD compex", and the large activation energies were ascribed to dehydration of viologen units to go through the CD cavity.

Isolation of Paenibacillus illinoisensis that produces cyclodextrin glucanotransferase resistant to organic solvents.

Doukyu, Noriyuki,Kuwahara, Hirokazu,Aono, Rikizo

, p. 334 - 340 (2003)

A bacterium that secreted cyclodextrin glucanotransferase (CGTase) in a medium overlaid with n-hexane was isolated and identified as Paenibacillus illinoisensis strain ST-12 K. The CGTase of the strain was purified from the culture supernatant. The molecular mass was 70 kDa. The enzyme was stable at pH 6 to 10 and active at pH 5.0 to 8.0. The optimum temperature at pH 7.0 was 65 degrees C in the presence of 5 mM CaCl2. The enzyme produced mainly beta-cyclodextrin. The total yield of alpha-, beta-, and gamma- cyclodextrins was increased 1.4-fold by the addition of ethanol. In particular, the yield of beta-cyclodextrins in the presence of 10% (vol/vol) ethanol was 1.6-fold that without ethanol. The CGTase was stable and active in the presence of large amounts of various organic solvents.

Synthesis of a Cyclodextrin Heterodimer Having α- and β-Cyclodextrin Units and Its Cooperative and Site-Specific Binding

Wang, Yong,Ueno, Akihiko,Toda, Fujio

, p. 167 - 170 (1994)

A cyclodextrin heterodimer, which has α- and β-cyclodextrin units as two different receptor sites, was prepared.It showed cooperative and site-specific binding to isoamyl p-dimethylaminobenzoate with the alkyl group included in the β-cyclodextrin cavity while dimethylaminobenzene moiety partially included in the α-cyclodextrin cavity.This binding mode was substantiated by the fact that the TICT emission of this guest is greatly enhanced by the cyclodextrin heterodimer.

Enzyme-mediated dynamic combinatorial chemistry allows out-of-equilibrium template-directed synthesis of macrocyclic oligosaccharides

Larsen, Dennis,Beeren, Sophie R.

, p. 9981 - 9987 (2019/11/14)

We show that the outcome of enzymatic reactions can be manipulated and controlled by using artificial template molecules to direct the self-assembly of specific products in an enzyme-mediated dynamic system. Specifically, we utilize a glycosyltransferase to generate a complex dynamic mixture of interconverting linear and macrocyclic α-1,4-d-glucans (cyclodextrins). We find that the native cyclodextrins (α, β and γ) are formed out-of-equilibrium as part of a kinetically trapped subsystem, that surprisingly operates transiently like a Dynamic Combinatorial Library (DCL) under thermodynamic control. By addition of different templates, we can promote the synthesis of each of the native cyclodextrins with 89-99% selectivity, or alternatively, we can amplify the synthesis of unusual large-ring cyclodextrins (δ and ?) with 9 and 10 glucose units per macrocycle. In the absence of templates, the transient DCL lasts less than a day, and cyclodextrins convert rapidly to short maltooligosaccharides. Templates stabilize the kinetically trapped subsystem enabling robust selective synthesis of cyclodextrins, as demonstrated by the high-yielding sequential interconversion of cyclodextrins in a single reaction vessel. Our results show that given the right balance between thermodynamic and kinetic control, templates can direct out-of-equilibrium self-assembly, and be used to manipulate enzymatic transformations to favor specific and/or alternative products to those selected in Nature.

Selective synthesis of a [3]rotaxane consisting of size-complementary components and its stepwise deslippage

Akae, Yosuke,Okamura, Hisashi,Koyama, Yasuhito,Arai, Takayuki,Takata, Toshikazu

supporting information; experimental part, p. 2226 - 2229 (2012/06/30)

An α-cyclodextrin-based size-complementary [3]rotaxane with an alkylene axle was selectively synthesized in one pot via an end-capping reaction with 2-bromophenyl isocyanate in water. Thermal degradation of the [3]rotaxane product yielded not only the ori

Coordination-assembly for quantitative construction of bis-branched molecular shuttles

Zhu, Liangliang,Lu, Meiqun,Qu, Dahui,Wang, Qiaochun,Tian, He

scheme or table, p. 4226 - 4233 (2011/07/29)

The development and utilization of a new way to build molecular devices is of importance. To build a novel topology of interlocked molecular systems with a controllable mechanical motion, an axle-like compound comprising azobenzene and alkoxy isophthalate

Process route upstream and downstream products

Process route

α-cyclodextrin-Methyl Orange complex
64887-49-6

α-cyclodextrin-Methyl Orange complex

methyl orange
547-58-0

methyl orange

alpha cyclodextrin
10016-20-3

alpha cyclodextrin

Conditions
Conditions Yield
In water; at 25 ℃; Equilibrium constant;
In methanol; water; at 25 ℃; Equilibrium constant;
In water; dimethyl sulfoxide; at 25 ℃; Equilibrium constant;
In water; ethylene glycol; at 25 ℃; Equilibrium constant;
In 1,4-dioxane; water; at 25 ℃; Equilibrium constant;
In water; isopropyl alcohol; at 25 ℃; Equilibrium constant;
In water; acetonitrile; at 25 ℃; Equilibrium constant;
In water; acetone; at 25 ℃; Equilibrium constant;
C<sub>36</sub>H<sub>60</sub>O<sub>30</sub>*C<sub>9</sub>H<sub>7</sub>NO<sub>6</sub>

C36H60O30*C9H7NO6

4-(acetyloxy)-3-nitrobenzoic acid
1210-97-5

4-(acetyloxy)-3-nitrobenzoic acid

alpha cyclodextrin
10016-20-3

alpha cyclodextrin

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With phosphate buffer; at 25 ℃; Equilibrium constant;
C<sub>36</sub>H<sub>60</sub>O<sub>30</sub>*C<sub>11</sub>H<sub>11</sub>NO<sub>6</sub>

C36H60O30*C11H11NO6

4-carboxy-2-nitrophenyl butanoate
56003-42-0

4-carboxy-2-nitrophenyl butanoate

alpha cyclodextrin
10016-20-3

alpha cyclodextrin

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With phosphate buffer; at 25 ℃; Equilibrium constant;
2C<sub>36</sub>H<sub>60</sub>O<sub>30</sub>*C<sub>11</sub>H<sub>11</sub>NO<sub>6</sub>

2C36H60O30*C11H11NO6

C<sub>36</sub>H<sub>60</sub>O<sub>30</sub>*C<sub>11</sub>H<sub>11</sub>NO<sub>6</sub>

C36H60O30*C11H11NO6

alpha cyclodextrin
10016-20-3

alpha cyclodextrin

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With phosphate buffer; at 25 ℃; Equilibrium constant;
2C<sub>36</sub>H<sub>60</sub>O<sub>30</sub>*C<sub>13</sub>H<sub>15</sub>NO<sub>6</sub>

2C36H60O30*C13H15NO6

C<sub>36</sub>H<sub>60</sub>O<sub>30</sub>*C<sub>13</sub>H<sub>15</sub>NO<sub>6</sub>

C36H60O30*C13H15NO6

alpha cyclodextrin
10016-20-3

alpha cyclodextrin

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With phosphate buffer; at 25 ℃; Equilibrium constant;
C<sub>36</sub>H<sub>60</sub>O<sub>30</sub>*C<sub>13</sub>H<sub>15</sub>NO<sub>6</sub>

C36H60O30*C13H15NO6

4-carboxy-2-nitrophenyl hexanoate
65293-27-8

4-carboxy-2-nitrophenyl hexanoate

alpha cyclodextrin
10016-20-3

alpha cyclodextrin

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With phosphate buffer; at 25 ℃; Equilibrium constant;
C<sub>36</sub>H<sub>60</sub>O<sub>30</sub>*C<sub>14</sub>H<sub>17</sub>NO<sub>6</sub>

C36H60O30*C14H17NO6

4-carboxy-2-nitrophenyl heptanoate
43049-38-3

4-carboxy-2-nitrophenyl heptanoate

alpha cyclodextrin
10016-20-3

alpha cyclodextrin

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With phosphate buffer; at 25 ℃; Equilibrium constant;
2C<sub>36</sub>H<sub>60</sub>O<sub>30</sub>*C<sub>14</sub>H<sub>17</sub>NO<sub>6</sub>

2C36H60O30*C14H17NO6

C<sub>36</sub>H<sub>60</sub>O<sub>30</sub>*C<sub>14</sub>H<sub>17</sub>NO<sub>6</sub>

C36H60O30*C14H17NO6

alpha cyclodextrin
10016-20-3

alpha cyclodextrin

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With phosphate buffer; at 25 ℃; Equilibrium constant;
2C<sub>36</sub>H<sub>60</sub>O<sub>30</sub>*C<sub>15</sub>H<sub>19</sub>NO<sub>6</sub>

2C36H60O30*C15H19NO6

C<sub>36</sub>H<sub>60</sub>O<sub>30</sub>*C<sub>15</sub>H<sub>19</sub>NO<sub>6</sub>

C36H60O30*C15H19NO6

alpha cyclodextrin
10016-20-3

alpha cyclodextrin

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With phosphate buffer; at 25 ℃; Equilibrium constant;
C<sub>36</sub>H<sub>60</sub>O<sub>30</sub>*C<sub>15</sub>H<sub>19</sub>NO<sub>6</sub>

C36H60O30*C15H19NO6

3-nitro-4-(octanoyloxy)benzoic acid
113894-26-1

3-nitro-4-(octanoyloxy)benzoic acid

alpha cyclodextrin
10016-20-3

alpha cyclodextrin

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With phosphate buffer; at 25 ℃; Equilibrium constant;

Global suppliers and manufacturers

Global( 178) Suppliers
  • Company Name
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  • Emails
  • Main Products
  • Country
  • Hangzhou Dingyan Chem Co., Ltd
  • Business Type:Manufacturers
  • Contact Tel:86-571-86465881,86-571-87157530,86-571-88025800
  • Emails:sales@dingyanchem.com
  • Main Products:95
  • Country:China (Mainland)
  • Simagchem Corporation
  • Business Type:Manufacturers
  • Contact Tel:+86-592-2680277
  • Emails:sale@simagchem.com
  • Main Products:110
  • Country:China (Mainland)
  • Kono Chem Co.,Ltd
  • Business Type:Other
  • Contact Tel:86-29-86107037-8015
  • Emails:info@konochemical.com
  • Main Products:82
  • Country:China (Mainland)
  • Amadis Chemical Co., Ltd.
  • Business Type:Lab/Research institutions
  • Contact Tel:86-571-89925085
  • Emails:sales@amadischem.com
  • Main Products:29
  • Country:China (Mainland)
  • Shaanxi BLOOM TECH Co.,Ltd
  • Business Type:Lab/Research institutions
  • Contact Tel:+86-29-86470566
  • Emails:sales@bloomtechz.com
  • Main Products:79
  • Country:China (Mainland)
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