Welcome to LookChem.com Sign In|Join Free

CAS

  • or

64-19-7

Post Buying Request

64-19-7 Suppliers

Recommended suppliersmore

  • Product
  • FOB Price
  • Min.Order
  • Supply Ability
  • Supplier
  • Contact Supplier

64-19-7 Usage

General Description

Acetic acid, also known as ethanoic acid, is a colorless liquid organic compound with a strong, pungent smell. It is classified as a weak carboxylic acid but can be concentrated to produce a reaction like a strong acid. Its chemical formula is CH3COOH and it has a molar mass of 60.052 g/mol. In solid state, it occurs as white, lustrous crystals. Acetic acid has natural origins since it is produced by acetic acid bacteria in fermented products, but it is also available as a commercially synthesizable chemical, primarily for the production of vinyl acetate monomer and acetic anhydride. In the food industry, Acetic acid is well known as the main component of vinegar. It is also used as a solvent in reactions and has a wide range of applications including food processing, pharmaceuticals, dye printing, and plastics production. Acetic acid also has significant play in textile and rubber industries. Despite its importance, it can cause burns, is harmful if ingested, and can irritate the eyes and skin.

Check Digit Verification of cas no

The CAS Registry Mumber 64-19-7 includes 5 digits separated into 3 groups by hyphens. The first part of the number,starting from the left, has 2 digits, 6 and 4 respectively; the second part has 2 digits, 1 and 9 respectively.
Calculate Digit Verification of CAS Registry Number 64-19:
(4*6)+(3*4)+(2*1)+(1*9)=47
47 % 10 = 7
So 64-19-7 is a valid CAS Registry Number.
InChI:InChI=1/C2H4O2/c1-2(3)4/h1H3,(H,3,4)

64-19-7 Well-known Company Product Price

  • Brand
  • (Code)Product description
  • CAS number
  • Packaging
  • Price
  • Detail
  • TCI America

  • (A2035)  Acetic Acid  >99.5%(T)

  • 64-19-7

  • 300mL

  • 140.00CNY

  • Detail
  • Alfa Aesar

  • (36289)  Acetic acid, glacial, ACS, 99.7+%   

  • 64-19-7

  • 100ml

  • 215.0CNY

  • Detail
  • Alfa Aesar

  • (36289)  Acetic acid, glacial, ACS, 99.7+%   

  • 64-19-7

  • 500ml

  • 342.0CNY

  • Detail
  • Alfa Aesar

  • (36289)  Acetic acid, glacial, ACS, 99.7+%   

  • 64-19-7

  • 2L

  • 755.0CNY

  • Detail
  • Alfa Aesar

  • (36289)  Acetic acid, glacial, ACS, 99.7+%   

  • 64-19-7

  • *4x500ml

  • 781.0CNY

  • Detail
  • Alfa Aesar

  • (38740)  Acetic acid, Environmental Grade, 99% min   

  • 64-19-7

  • 500ml

  • 1442.0CNY

  • Detail
  • Alfa Aesar

  • (38740)  Acetic acid, Environmental Grade, 99% min   

  • 64-19-7

  • 2.5L

  • 5047.0CNY

  • Detail
  • Alfa Aesar

  • (38739)  Acetic acid, Environmental Grade Plus, 99.4% min   

  • 64-19-7

  • 250ml

  • 4197.0CNY

  • Detail
  • Alfa Aesar

  • (38739)  Acetic acid, Environmental Grade Plus, 99.4% min   

  • 64-19-7

  • 500ml

  • 6383.0CNY

  • Detail
  • Alfa Aesar

  • (33252)  Acetic acid, glacial, 99+%   

  • 64-19-7

  • 250ml

  • 252.0CNY

  • Detail
  • Alfa Aesar

  • (33252)  Acetic acid, glacial, 99+%   

  • 64-19-7

  • 1L

  • 366.0CNY

  • Detail
  • Alfa Aesar

  • (33252)  Acetic acid, glacial, 99+%   

  • 64-19-7

  • 4L

  • 537.0CNY

  • Detail

64-19-7SDS

SAFETY DATA SHEETS

According to Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) - Sixth revised edition

Version: 1.0

Creation Date: Aug 12, 2017

Revision Date: Aug 12, 2017

1.Identification

1.1 GHS Product identifier

Product name acetic acid

1.2 Other means of identification

Product number -
Other names Glacial acetic acid

1.3 Recommended use of the chemical and restrictions on use

Identified uses For industry use only. Processing Aids and Additives
Uses advised against no data available

1.4 Supplier's details

1.5 Emergency phone number

Emergency phone number -
Service hours Monday to Friday, 9am-5pm (Standard time zone: UTC/GMT +8 hours).

More Details:64-19-7 SDS

64-19-7Synthetic route

glycerol
56-81-5

glycerol

A

acetic acid
64-19-7

acetic acid

B

acrolein
107-02-8

acrolein

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With offretite impregnated with 4.7 wt.percent vanadium In water at 320℃; under 760.051 Torr; for 2h; Flow reactor;A n/a
B 24.2%
With Cs-doped silicotungstic acid supported on α-Al2O3 at 300℃; for 1.5h;
With mesoporous siliconiobium phosphate In water at 250℃; under 760.051 Torr; for 4h; Reagent/catalyst; Inert atmosphere;
methanol
67-56-1

methanol

carbon monoxide
201230-82-2

carbon monoxide

A

acetic acid methyl ester
79-20-9

acetic acid methyl ester

B

acetic acid
64-19-7

acetic acid

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With methyl iodide; rhodium(III) chloride In 3-butyl-1-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) amide; water at 130℃; under 22502.3 Torr; for 2h; Compressed gas;A 0.5%
B 99.5%
With methyl iodide; rhodium(III) chloride In 3-butyl-1-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) amide; water at 130℃; under 22502.3 Torr; for 2h; Compressed gas;A 3.9%
B 96.1%
With methyl iodide; rhodium(III) chloride In 3-butyl-1-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) amide at 130℃; under 22502.3 Torr; for 2h; Compressed gas;A 3%
B 96%
glycerol
56-81-5

glycerol

A

acetaldehyde
75-07-0

acetaldehyde

B

acetic acid
64-19-7

acetic acid

C

acrylic acid
79-10-7

acrylic acid

D

acrolein
107-02-8

acrolein

Conditions
ConditionsYield
With zeolite-β impregnated with 4.2 wt.% vanadium In water at 320℃; under 760.051 Torr; for 2h; Reagent/catalyst; Flow reactor;A n/a
B n/a
C 6.1%
D 52.8%
With water; oxygen at 290℃; for 1.5h; Reagent/catalyst; Temperature; Inert atmosphere; Flow reactor;A n/a
B n/a
C 51 %Chromat.
D n/a
With oxygen In water at 266℃; under 760.051 Torr; Temperature; Flow reactor;A n/a
B n/a
C 32.5 %Chromat.
D 23.6 %Chromat.

64-19-7Relevant articles and documents

-

Cave

, p. 1853 (1953)

-

DECOMPOSITION OF PERACETIC ACID CATALYZED BY VANADIUM COMPLEXES

Makarov, A. P.,Gekhman, A. E.,Polotnyuk, O. Ya.,Moiseev, I. I.

, p. 1749 - 1752 (1985)

-

Peroxy Acid Oxidations. II. A Kinetic and Mechanistic Study of Oxidation of α-Diketones

Panda, Radhasyam,Panigrahi, Akhil Krishna,Patnaik, Chakrapani,Sahu, Sabita Kumari,Mahapatra, Sabita Kumari

, p. 1363 - 1368 (1988)

The kinetics of Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of biacetyl and benzil by peroxomonophosphoric acid and peroxomonosulfuric acid have been studied in different pH ranges at 308 K.The reactions are second order; first order each in peroxy acid and in diketone concentrations at constant pH.The oxidation rate is strongly pH-dependent; the rate increases with increase in pH.From the pH-rate data the reactivity of different peroxo species, in the oxidation, has been determined.A mechanism consistent with rate-detemining nucleophilic attack of peroxo species on carbonyl carbon of the diketone molecule has been proposed.Acetic acid and benzoic acid are respectively found to be the products of oxidation of biacetyl and benzil.

Kinetics of formation of peroxyacetic acid

Dul'neva,Moskvin

, p. 1125 - 1130 (2005)

The kinetics of the reaction of acetic acid with hydrogen peroxide, leading to peroxyacetic acid, were studied at various molar reactant ratios (AcOH-H2O2 from 6 : 1 to 1 : 6) at 20, 40, and 60°C and sulfuric acid (catalyst) concentrations of 0 to 9 wt %. The reaction is reversible, and the equilibrium constant decreases as the temperature rises: K = 2.10 (20°C), 1.46 (40°C), 1.07 (60°C); Δr H 0 = - 13.7±0.1 kJ mol-1, Δr S = -40.5±0.4 J mol-1 K-1. The maximal equilibrium concentration of peroxyacetic acid (2.3 M) is attained at 20°C and a molar AcOH-to-H2O2 ratio of 2.5 : 1. The rate constants of both forward and reverse reactions increase with increase in sulfuric acid concentration from 0 to 5 wt %. Further raising the catalyst concentration does not affect the reaction rate. The reaction mechanism is discussed. 2005 Pleiades Publishing, Inc.

A high-throughput pH-based colorimetric assay: application focus on alpha/beta hydrolases

Paye, Mariétou F.,Rose, Harrison B.,Robbins, John M.,Yunda, Diana A.,Cho, Seonggeon,Bommarius, Andreas S.

, p. 80 - 90 (2018)

Research involving α/β hydrolases, including α-amino acid ester hydrolase and cocaine esterase, has been limited by the lack of an online high throughput screening assay. The development of a high throughput screening assay capable of detecting α/β hydrolase activity toward specific substrates and/or chemical reactions (e.g., hydrolysis in lieu of amidase activity and/or synthesis instead of thioesterase activity) is of interest in a broad set of scientific questions and applications. Here we present a general framework for pH-based colorimetric assays, as well as the mathematical considerations necessary to estimate de novo the experimental response required to assign a ‘hit’ or a ‘miss,’ in the absence of experimental standard curves. This combination is valuable for screening the hydrolysis and synthesis activity of α/β hydrolases on a variety of substrates, and produces data comparable to the current standard technique involving High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). In contrast to HPLC, this assay enables screening experiments to be performed with greater efficiency.

Kinetic studies on the oxidation of iodide by peroxyacetic acid

Awad, Mohamed Ismail,Oritani, Tadato,Ohsaka, Takeo

, p. 253 - 256 (2003)

The kinetics of the oxidation of iodide by peroxyacetic acid (PAA) in aqueous media in the presence and absence of the heptamolybdate has been studied by a high time resolution spectrophotometric stopped-flow method. The time-dependent concentration of the liberated iodine was monitored by the change in absorbance at 352 nm. The effect of ammonium heptamolybdate as well as pH on the rate of the reaction was also studied and it was found that the rate of the reaction is independent of pH and molybdate concentration under the examined conditions. The results obtained show that the rate law of the reaction can be expressed as rate=k[PAA][I-] with a value of k=4.22×102 (mole/l)-1 s-1 at pH 3.5-5.4 and 25°C.

Activity, recyclability, and stability of lipases immobilized on oil-filled spherical silica nanoparticles with different silica shell structures

Kuwahara, Yasutaka,Yamanishi, Takato,Kamegawa, Takashi,Mori, Kohsuke,Yamashita, Hiromi

, p. 2527 - 2536 (2013)

Candida antarctica lipaseA was immobilized on spherical silica nanoparticles with oil-filled core and oil-induced mesoporous silica shell with different silica shell structures. The immobilization of enzymes was achieved by directly adding enzymes to the oil-in-water emulsion system under ambient synthesis conditions, and the silica shell structure was controlled by the addition of the cosolvent ethanol to the initial synthesis medium. Detailed structural analysis revealed the formation of oil-filled spherical silica nanoparticles with 3.4-4.2nm mesopores randomly arranged in the silica shell; the thickness and pore characteristics of these pores markedly changed with the addition of ethanol. The retention of the enzyme activity during biocatalysis was significantly affected by the structural properties of the silica shells, and it was found that a thick and dense silica shell is essential to afford an active, recyclable, and stable biocatalyst. Furthermore, the oil encapsulated within the core cavity was found to play an important role in achieving a high catalytic efficiency. Trapped oil: Candida antarctica lipaseA is immobilized on oil-filled spherical silica nanoparticles with different silica shell structures through an anionic surfactant-induced self-assembly approach (see scheme) with ethanol as a cosolvent. The entrapped enzymes mostly retain their activities and exhibit recyclability and thermal and chemical stability, depending on the thickness and pore characteristics of the silica shells. TEOS=Tetraethoxyorthosilicate, APTES=3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane.

Radical catalyzed debromination of bromo-alkanes by formate in aqueous solutions via a hydrogen atom transfer mechanism

Shandalov, Elisabetha,Zilbermann, Israel,Maimon, Eric,Nahmani, Yeoshua,Cohen, Haim,Adar, Eilon,Meyerstein, Dan

, p. 989 - 992 (2004)

CO2·- radicals catalyze the dehalogenation of bromo-alkanes by formate via a hydrogen atom transfer mechanism.

A Highly Efficient Copper(II) Complex catalysed Hydrolysis of Methyl Acetate at pH 7.0 and 25 deg C

Chin, Jik,Jubian, Vrej

, p. 839 - 841 (1989)

The turnover time for 2+ (1 mM) catalysed hydrolysis of methyl acetate (1 M) is 23 min at pH 7, 25 deg C.

Selective oxidation of ethane to acetic acid selective oxidation of ethane to acetic acid catalyzed catalyzed by by a c-scorpionate c-scorpionate iron(Ii) iron(ii) complex: Complex: A ahomogeneous vs.vs.heterogeneous comparison

Martins, Luísa M. D. R. S.,Matias, Inês A. S.,Ribeiro, Ana P. C.

, (2020)

The direct, one-pot oxidation of ethane to acetic acid was, for the first time, performed using a C-scorpionate complex anchored onto a magnetic core-shell support, the Fe3O4/TiO2/[FeCl2{κ3 -HC(pz)3}] composite. This catalytic system, where the magnetic catalyst is easily recovered and reused, is highly selective to the acetic acid synthesis. The performed green metrics calculations highlight the “greeness” of the new ethane oxidation procedure.

Langenbeck,Ruzicka

, p. 192 (1955)

Effect of ammonium perfluorooctanoate on acetylcholinesterase activity and inhibition using MALDI-FTICRMS

Cai, Tingting,Zhang, Li,Wang, Rong,Liang, Chen,Zhang, Yurong,Guo, Yinlong

, p. 80 - 83 (2013)

Ammonium perfluorooctanoate (APFO) is a commercially important compound, but its harm to people's health has raised widespread concern. In the past, the investigations into APFO and its degradation product (perfluorooctanoic acid, PFOA) were all about their effect on indicator compounds in animals and enzyme activities. Here, we provided a new suggestion to investigate the influence of APFO and PFOA. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was chosen as research subject to reflect the effect of external perfluorochemicals. We applied matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTICRMS) to detect the activity of AChE rapidly and accurately. On this basis, not only AChE activity but also AChE inhibition was studied carefully. The presence of APFO and PFOA showed obvious increase of AChE activity. Moreover, addition of both APFO and PFOA had enhanced AChE inhibition from organophosphorous (OP) pesticide (irreversible inhibitor). Otherwise, the participation of APFO and PFOA had not increased AChE inhibitions from reversible inhibitor galantamine. These results might provide new insights into the effect of APFO and encourage the deep understanding about effect of APFO on human being.

Oxidative decarboxylation of levulinic acid by cupric oxides

Gong, Yan,Lin, Lu,Shi, Jianbin,Liu, Shijie

, p. 7946 - 7960 (2010)

In this paper, cupric oxides was found to effectively oxidize levulinic acid (LA) and lead to the decarboxylation of levulinic acid to 2-butanone. The effects of cupric oxide dosage, reaction time and initial pH value were investigated in batch experiments and a plausible mechanism was proposed. The results showed that LA decarboxylation over cupric oxides at around 300 °C under acidic conditions produced the highest yield of butanone (67.5%). In order to elucidate the catalytic activity of cupric oxides, XRD, AFM, XPS and H 2-TPR techniques was applied to examine their molecular surfaces and their effects on the reaction process.

Single-pot conversion of methane into acetic acid in the absence of CO and with vanadium catalysts such as amavadine

Reis, Patricia M.,Silva, Jose A. L.,Palavra, Antonio F.,Frausto da Silva, Joao J. R.,Kitamura, Tsugio,Fujiwara, Yuzo,Pombeiro, Armando J. L.

, p. 821 - 823 (2003)

Although its biological function is still unknown, the naturally occurring vanadium complex amavadine may be suitable for industrial applications: This compound (as well as other VIV and VV complexes with N,O and O,O ligands) are shown to act as catalysts for the direct conversion of methane into acetic acid, without requiring CO, under very mild conditions and in high yields (see scheme).

Reactor kinetics studies via process raman spectroscopy, multivariate chemometrics, and kinetics modeling

Assirelli, Melissa,Xu, Weiyin,Chew, Wee

, p. 610 - 621 (2011)

The deployment of in situ analytics for monitoring chemical reactions in process chemistry development and scale-up is facilitated by advanced instrumentation such as Raman spectrometry. Furthermore, greater process understanding can be engendered by coupling in situ Raman data with multivariate chemometrics analyses and kinetics modeling. Such information is important for devising science-based process control strategies along the concept of quality by design (QbD) initiated through the U.S. FDA process analytical technology (PAT) framework. A series of experiments using varied glass reactors, stirring speeds, and isothermal reaction temperatures were designed with acetic anhydride hydrolysis as the model reaction to successfully demonstrate the efficacy of combining in situ Raman spectroscopy, multivariate analyses, and kinetics modeling. Two different Raman measurement methods, using immersion and noncontact probe optics, were tested through a process Raman spectrometer with multiplexing capability. Information-theoretic multivariate chemometrics were applied to elicit pure component spectra and transient concentrations of chemical species, and two differential-algebraic equations modeling approaches were adopted for elucidating chemical and dissolution kinetics information. The variations in reactor vessel type and sizes, stirring speeds, Raman measurements, and kinetics models were compared in this study.

Effect of Pd loading and precursor on the catalytic performance of Pd/WO3-ZrO2 catalysts for selective oxidation of ethylene

Wang, Lixia,Xu, Shuliang,Chu, Wenling,Yang, Weishen

, p. 163 - 166 (2010)

The structure and properties of Pd/WO3-ZrO2 (W/Zr = 0.2) catalysts with different Pd loadings and precursors were investigated. The results indicate that Pd/WO3-ZrO2 prepared from a PdCl2 precursor was optimum for high activity and selectivity. Moreover, ethylene conversion increased with the Pd loading. The structure and nature of the catalysts were characterized using X-ray diffraction, BET N2 adsorption, H2 temperature-programmed reduction and H2 pulse adsorption techniques. The results reveal that the higher catalytic performance of Pd/WO3-ZrO2 prepared from PdCl2 could be related to the formation of polytungstate species and the existence of well-dispersed Pd particles.

Conversion of Formaldehyde to Acetic Acid. Formic Acid as a Stoichiometric CO Substitute

Kaplan, Leonard

, p. 5376 - 5377 (1985)

-

Dissociative nucleophilic substitution of η2-olefin complexes via a novel η2-vinyl cation inTermediate

Chen, Huiyuan,Harman, W. Dean

, p. 5672 - 5683 (1996)

A series of η2-[Os(NH3)5(vinyl ether)]2+ complexes have been prepared by three independent methods that involve direct coordination of a vinyl ether, alcohol addition to an η2-alkyne complex, or nucleophilic substitution of an η2-vinyl ether species. In the presence of an acid catalyst, the vinyl ether ligand undergoes a novel acid-catalyzed substitution reaction at the α-carbon with a broad range of nucleophiles that includes alcohols, amines, carboxylates, hydrides, silylated enols, nitriles, phosphines, and dialkyl sulfides. These reactions appear to proceed through an elimination-addition process where the first step is loss of an alcohol to form an η2-vinyl cation intermediate. In cases where the α-carbon bears an alkyl group, an η2-vinyl cation species can be isolated and characterized. For example, protonation of [Os(NH3)5(η2-2-methoxypropene)]2+ (3) in neat HOTf allows the characterization of the substitution reaction intermediate η2-[Os(NH3)5(C3H5)]3+ (32), formally a metallocyclopropene that behaves chemically like a vinyl cation. In contrast, when the α-carbon of the vinyl ether bears a hydrogen such as with [Os(NH3)5(η2-ethoxyethene)]2+ (1), the hypothetical vinyl cation intermediate, in absence of a suitable nucleophile, undergoes an intramolecular 1,2-hydrogen shift to yield the Fischer carbyne [(NH3)5Os≡CCH3]3+ (33). Examples of nucleophilic substitution reactions for other types of η2-[Os(NH3)5(olefin)](n+) complexes are also demonstrated.

Dioxygen activation at room temperature during controllable and highly efficient acetaldehyde-to-acetic acid oxidation using a simple iron(III)-acetonitrile complex

Li, Renhong,Kobayashi, Hisayoshi,Yan, Xiaoqing,Fan, Jie

, p. 140 - 146 (2014)

We show that highly efficient acetaldehyde-to-acetic acid oxidation is achieved in a diluted FeCl3-acetonitrile solution (5-100 μM), which proceeds rather rapidly and follows the enzymatic-like Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Interestingly, by adjusting the concentration of FeCl3, we are able to accelerate or shut down the oxidation process conveniently. Based on the catalytic results, spectroscopic evidences and successive DFT calculations, a reactant-initiated, putative mononuclear non-heme iron-oxygen complex, [FeCl(MeCN)4(O)]2+, is proposed as the active oxidizing species to conduct the room temperature reaction with relatively high TOF values (~1.2 s-1). Finally, the putative iron-oxygen complexes are employed to the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol under ambient conditions.

Structure and characterization of amidase from Rhodococcus sp. N-771: Insight into the molecular mechanism of substrate recognition

Ohtaki, Akashi,Murata, Kensuke,Sato, Yuichi,Noguchi, Keiichi,Miyatake, Hideyuki,Dohmae, Naoshi,Yamada, Kazuhiro,Yohda, Masafumi,Odaka, Masfumi

, p. 184 - 192 (2010)

In this study, we have structurally characterized the amidase of a nitrile-degrading bacterium, Rhodococcus sp. N-771 (RhAmidase). RhAmidase belongs to amidase signature (AS) family, a group of amidase families, and is responsible for the degradation of amides produced from nitriles by nitrile hydratase. Recombinant RhAmidase exists as a dimer of about 107?kDa. RhAmidase can hydrolyze acetamide, propionamide, acrylamide and benzamide with kcat/Km values of 1.14 ± 0.23?mM- 1s- 1, 4.54 ± 0.09?mM- 1s- 1, 0.087 ± 0.02?mM- 1s- 1 and 153.5 ± 7.1?mM- 1s- 1, respectively. The crystal structures of RhAmidase and its inactive mutant complex with benzamide (S195A/benzamide) were determined at resolutions of 2.17?A? and 2.32?A?, respectively. RhAmidase has three domains: an N-terminal α-helical domain, a small domain and a large domain. The N-terminal α-helical domain is not found in other AS family enzymes. This domain is involved in the formation of the dimer structure and, together with the small domain, forms a narrow substrate-binding tunnel. The large domain showed high structural similarities to those of other AS family enzymes. The Ser-cis Ser-Lys catalytic triad is located in the large domain. But the substrate-binding pocket of RhAmidase is relatively narrow, due to the presence of the helix α13 in the small domain. The hydrophobic residues from the small domain are involved in recognizing the substrate. The small domain likely participates in substrate recognition and is related to the difference of substrate specificities among the AS family amidases.

Coenzyme Models. 33. Evidence for Retro-acyloin Condensation as Catalyzed by Thiazolium Ion and Cationic Micelle. Oxidative Trapping of the "Active Aldehyde" Intermediates by Flavin

Shinkai, Seiji,Hara, Youichiro,Manabe, Osamu

, p. 770 - 774 (1983)

N-Hexadecylthiazolium bromide (HxdT) in the CTAB micelle, which is known as an excellent catalytic system for acyloin condensation of aldehydes, catalyzes the reverse reaction (i.e., retro-acyloin condensation) to give aldehydes from α-ketols via the active aldehyde intermediates.The existence of the novel, HxdT-mediated process was proposed on the basis of an experimental discovery that flavin (3-methyltetra-O-acetylriboflavin: MeFl), which is capable of oxidatively trapping the active aldehyde intermediates, is reduced by α-ketols such as acetoin and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-2-butanone in the micellized HxdT solution.It was further substantiated by detection of acetaldehyde in the final reaction mixture.Based on the diasappearance rate of the absorbance of MeFl, we spectrophotometrically estimated the rate constants for the retro-acyloin condensation.Similarly, biacetyl, the monohydrated species of which is analogous to α-ketol, afforded acetaldehyde and acetic acid in the micellized HxdT solution, the rate constant being greater by factors of 102-103 than those for α-ketols.The relevance of the retro-acyloin condensation to biological systems (e.g., the mechanism of transketolase catalysis) is discussed.

Photoelectrochemistry of Levulinic Acid on Undoped Platinized n-TiO2 Powders

Chum, H. L.,Ratcliff, M.,Posey, F. L.,Turner, J. A.,Nozik, A. J.

, p. 3089 - 3093 (1983)

The photoelectrochemistry of levulinic (4-oxopentanoic) acid, the major product of controlled degradation of cellulose by acids, has been investigated.Since this acid can be present in waste streams of biomass processing, we investigated the photoelectrochemical reactions of this acid on slurries composed of semiconductor/metal particles.The semiconductor investigated was platinized undoped n-TiO2, as anatase, anatase-rutile mixture, or rutile.The effects of the level of platinization, pH, acid concentration, and the semiconductor surface area were investigated.In addition to the decarboxylation reaction leading to methyl ethyl ketone, we have also observed novel cleavages of the C-C backbone leading to propionic acid, acetic acid, acetone, and acetaldehyde as major products.These lower molecular weight carboxylic acids undergo decarboxylation at the slurry diodes to ethane and methane.The organic product distribution is a complex function of the crystallographic phase of n-TiO2 and of the level of metallization of the semiconductor powder.

Formic Acid Promotion of Transition-metal Catalysed Isomerization of Methyl Formate

Cheong, Minserk,Bae, Seong-ho,Lee, Kang B.

, p. 1557 - 1558 (1995)

MeI-HCO2H is an extremely effective promoter/solvent combination for the transition-metal catalysed conversion of methyl formate to acetic acid in the absence of initial carbon monoxide pressure.

Application of band-target entropy minimization to on-line raman monitoring of an organic synthesis. An example of new technology for process analytical technology

Widjaja, Effendi,Ying, Yan Tan,Garland, Marc

, p. 98 - 103 (2007)

The hydrolysis of acetic anhydride to acetic acid in water as solvent was monitored by Raman microscopy. Both static and flow-through configurations were used in the experiments, and various experimental designs, i.e., multiple-experimental runs and multiple-perturbation semibatch mode, were considered. Various spectral data preprocessing was performed and band-target entropy minimization (BTEM) was used in the spectral analysis to recover the pure-component spectra from the multicomponent data. Good and consistent spectral estimates of the solutes acetic anhydride and acetic acid were recovered. In addition, the pure-component spectrum of white-light interference was recovered. Together, these estimates permitted very good estimates of the individual time-dependent signal contributions. Taken together, the present results suggest that the combination of Raman spectroscopy and BTEM has considerable potential for organic syntheses and process analysis. The combination of Raman spectroscopy and BTEM represents another approach for reaction monitoring in process analytical technologies (PAT).

Reaction coordinate analysis for β-diketone cleavage by the non-heme Fe2+-dependent dioxygenase Dke1

Straganz, Grit D.,Nidetzky, Bernd

, p. 12306 - 12314 (2005)

Acetylacetone dioxygenase from Acinetobacter johnsonii(Dke1) utilizes a non-heme Fe2+ cofactor to promote dioxygen-dependent conversion of 2,4-pentanedione (PD) into methylglyoxal and acetate. An oxidative carbon-carbon bond cleavage by Dke1 is triggered from a C-3 peroxidate intermediate that performs an intramolecular nucleophilic attack on the adjacent carbonyl group. But how does Dke1 bring about the initial reduction of dioxygen? To answer this question, we report here a reaction coordinate analysis for the part of the Dke1 catalytic cycle that involves O2 chemistry. A weak visible absorption band (ε ≈ 0.2 mM-1 cm-1) that is characteristic of an enzyme-bound Fe2+-β-keto-enolate complex served as spectroscopic probe of substrate binding and internal catalytic steps. Transient and steady-state kinetic studies reveal that O2-dependent conversion of the chromogenic binary complex is rate-limiting for the overall reaction. Linear free-energy relationship analysis, in which apparent turnover numbers (kcatapp) for enzymatic bond cleavage of a series of substituted β-dicarbonyl substrates were correlated with calculated energies for the highest occupied molecular orbitals of the corresponding β-keto-enolate structures, demonstrates unambiguously that k catapp is governed by the electron-donating ability of the substrate. The case of 2′-hydroxyacetophenone (2′HAP), a completely inactive β-dicarbonyl analogue that has the enol double bond delocalized into the aromatic ring, indicates that dioxygen reduction and C-O bond formation cannot be decoupled and therefore take place in one single kinetic step.

Photophysics of Perylene Diimide Dianions and Their Application in Photoredox Catalysis

Li, Han,Wenger, Oliver S.

supporting information, (2021/12/23)

The two-electron reduced forms of perylene diimides (PDIs) are luminescent closed-shell species whose photochemical properties seem underexplored. Our proof-of-concept study demonstrates that straightforward (single) excitation of PDI dianions with green

Nanoconfinement Engineering over Hollow Multi-Shell Structured Copper towards Efficient Electrocatalytical C?C coupling

Li, Jiawei,Liu, Chunxiao,Xia, Chuan,Xue, Weiqing,Zeng, Jie,Zhang, Menglu,Zheng, Tingting

supporting information, (2021/12/06)

Nanoconfinement provides a promising solution to promote electrocatalytic C?C coupling, by dramatically altering the diffusion kinetics to ensure a high local concentration of C1 intermediates for carbon dimerization. Herein, under the guidance of finite-element method simulations results, a series of Cu2O hollow multi-shell structures (HoMSs) with tunable shell numbers were synthesized via Ostwald ripening. When applied in CO2 electroreduction (CO2RR), the in situ formed Cu HoMSs showed a positive correlation between shell numbers and selectivity for C2+ products, reaching a maximum C2+ Faradaic efficiency of 77.0±0.3 % at a conversion rate of 513.7±0.7 mA cm?2 in a neutral electrolyte. Mechanistic studies clarified the confinement effect of HoMSs that superposition of Cu shells leads to a higher coverage of localized CO adsorbate inside the cavity for enhanced dimerization. This work provides valuable insights for the delicate design of efficient C?C coupling catalysts.

Photothermal strategy for the highly efficient conversion of glucose into lactic acid at low temperatures over a hybrid multifunctional multi-walled carbon nanotube/layered double hydroxide catalyst

Duo, Jia,Jin, Binbin,Jin, Fangming,Shi, Xiaoyu,Wang, Tianfu,Ye, Xin,Zhong, Heng

, p. 813 - 822 (2022/02/09)

The conversion of carbohydrates into lactic acid has attracted increasing attention owing to the broad applications of lactic acid. However, the current methods of thermochemical conversion commonly suffer from limited selectivity or the need for harsh conditions. Herein, a light-driven system of highly selective conversion of glucose into lactic acid at low temperatures was developed. By constructing a hybrid multifunctional multi-walled carbon nanotube/layered double hydroxide composite catalyst (CNT/LDHs), the highest lactic acid yield of 88.6% with 90.0% selectivity was achieved. The performance of CNT/LDHs for lactic acid production from glucose is attributed to the following factors: (i) CNTs generate a strong heating center under irradiation, providing heat for converting glucose into lactic acid; (ii) LDHs catalyze glucose isomerization, in which the photoinduced OVs (Lewis acid) in LDHs under irradiation further improve the catalytic activity; and (iii) in a heterogeneous-homogeneous synergistically catalytic system (LDHs-OH-), OH- ions are concentrated in LDHs, forming strong base sites to catalyze subsequent cascade reactions.

Post a RFQ

Enter 15 to 2000 letters.Word count: 0 letters

Attach files(File Format: Jpeg, Jpg, Gif, Png, PDF, PPT, Zip, Rar,Word or Excel Maximum File Size: 3MB)

1

What can I do for you?
Get Best Price

Get Best Price for 64-19-7