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Cas Database

75-21-8

75-21-8

Identification

  • Product Name:Ethylene oxide

  • CAS Number: 75-21-8

  • EINECS:200-849-9

  • Molecular Weight:44.0532

  • Molecular Formula: C2H4O

  • HS Code:2910100000

  • Mol File:75-21-8.mol

Synonyms:Ethyleneoxide (8CI);Ethyleneoxy (6CI);1,2-Epoxyethane;Dihydrooxirene;Dimethylene oxide;ETO;Epoxyethane;Ethene oxide;Oxacyclopropane;Oxane;Oxidoethane;Oxirene, dihydro-;Oxyfume;Oxyfume 12;Oxyfume 2002;T-Gas;

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Safety information and MSDS view more

  • Pictogram(s):HighlyF+; ToxicT

  • Hazard Codes:F+; T

  • Signal Word:Danger

  • Hazard Statement:H220 Extremely flammable gasH315 Causes skin irritation H319 Causes serious eye irritation H331 Toxic if inhaled H335 May cause respiratory irritation H340 May cause genetic defects H350 May cause cancer

  • First-aid measures: General adviceConsult a physician. Show this safety data sheet to the doctor in attendance.If inhaled Fresh air, rest. Refer for medical attention. In case of skin contact Remove contaminated clothes. ON FROSTBITE: rinse with plenty of water, do NOT remove clothes. Rinse skin with plenty of water or shower. Refer for medical attention . In case of eye contact First rinse with plenty of water for several minutes (remove contact lenses if easily possible), then refer for medical attention. If swallowed Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious person. Rinse mouth with water. Consult a physician. It can cause death. Lowest inhalation concentration causing toxic effects is 12500 ppm/10 seconds. It is a strong skin irritant. Neurological disorders and even death have been reported. (EPA, 1998) Establish and maintain vital functions. ... Administer warm humidified oxygen and bronchodilators, if needed. Treat cardiac dysrhythmias and control convulsions with standard treatments. Monitor for several hours after exposure. Significant exposure usually causes effects that indicate hospital admission.

  • Fire-fighting measures: Suitable extinguishing media GAS: Poisonous gases are produced in fire. Do not estinguish the fire unless the flow of gas can be stopped and any remaining gas is out of the line. Specially trained personnel may use fog lines to cool exposures and let the fire burn itself out. Vapors are heavier than air and will collect in low areas. Vapors may travel long distances to ignition sources and flashback. Vapors in confined area may explode in fire. Storage containers and parts of containers may rocket great distances, in many directions. If materials or contaminated runoff enters waterways, notify downstream users of potentially contaminated waters. Notify local health and fire officials and pollution control agencies. From a secure, explosion-proof location, use water spray to cool exposed containers. If cooling streams are ineffective (venting sound increases in volume and pitch, tank discolors, or shows any signs of deforming), withdraw immediately to a secure position. If employees are expected to fight fires, they must be trained and equipped. LIQUID: Poisonous gases are produced in fire. Use dry chemical, carbon dioxide, or foam extinguishers. Although soluble in water, solutions will continue to burn until diluted to approximately 22 volumes of water to one volume of ethylene oxide. Vapors are heavier than air and will collect in low areas. Vapors may travel long distances to ignition sources and flashback. Vapors in confined area may explode in fire. Storage containers and parts of containers may rocket great distances, in many directions. If materials or contaminated runoff enters waterways, notify downstream users of potentially contaminated waters. Notify local health and fire officials and pollution control agencies. From a secure, explosion-proof location, use water spray to cool exposed containers. If cooling streams are ineffective (venting sound increases in volume and pitch, tank discolors, or shows any signs of deforming), withdraw immediately to a secure position. If employees are expected to fight fires, they must be trained and equipped. Severe explosion hazard when exposed to heat or flame. Irritating vapors are generated when heated. Vapor is heavier than air and may travel considerable distance to a source of ignition and flash back. Vapor forms explosive mixtures with air over a wide range. Liquid is not detonable but the vapor may be readily initiated into explosive decomposition. Avoid metal fittings containing copper, silver, mercury or magnesium; ammonia, oxidizing agents; acids, organic bases; amines; certain salts; alcohols; mercaptans, ferric chloride; magnesium perchlorate; m-nitroaniline; trimethylamine, potassium, tin chlorides; alkanethiols; bromoethane; aluminum chloride; aluminum oxide; iron chlorides; and iron oxides. Avoid air, heat, acids and bases, metal or metal chloride catalysts. Hazardous polymerization may occur. Avoid acids; covalent halides such as chlorides of aluminum, iron (III), tin (IV); basic materials like alkali hydrides, ammonia, amines, and potassium; catalytically active solids such as aluminum or iron oxides or rust, chlorides of boron, aluminum, tin, and iron; some carbonates; and metals such as copper and copper alloys (EPA, 1998) Wear self-contained breathing apparatus for firefighting if necessary.

  • Accidental release measures: Use personal protective equipment. Avoid dust formation. Avoid breathing vapours, mist or gas. Ensure adequate ventilation. Evacuate personnel to safe areas. Avoid breathing dust. For personal protection see section 8. Evacuate danger area! Consult an expert! Personal protection: gas-tight chemical protection suit including self-contained breathing apparatus. Ventilation. Do NOT wash away into sewer. NEVER direct water jet on liquid. Remove gas with fine water spray. GAS: Evacuate and restrict persons not wearing protective equipment from area of spill or leak until cleanup is complete. Remove all ignition sources. Establish forced ventilation to keep levels below explosive limit. Stop the flow of gas if it can be done safely. If source of leak us a cylinder and the leak cannot be stopped in place, remove leaking cylinder to a safe place in the open air, and repair leak or allow cylinder to empty. Keep this chemical out of a confined space, such as a sewer, because of the possibility of an explosion, unless the sewer is designed to prevent the build-up of explosive concentrations. LIQUID: For small spills flush area with flooding amounts of water. For large spills, dike spill for later disposal. Absorb liquids in vermiculite, dry sand, earth, or a similar non-organic materials and deposit in sealed containers. May also be covered with weak reducing agents; resulting sludge neutralized and flushed to sewer. Collect powdered material in the most convenient and safe manner and deposit in sealed containers. Ventilate area of spill or leak after clean-up is complete. It may be necessary to contain and dispose of this chemical as a hazardous waste. If material or contaminated runoff enters waterways, notify downstream users of potentially contaminated waters. Contact your Department of Environmental Protection or your regional office of the federal EPA for specific recommendations. If employees are required to clean-up spills, they must be properly trained and equipped.

  • Handling and storage: Avoid contact with skin and eyes. Avoid formation of dust and aerosols. Avoid exposure - obtain special instructions before use.Provide appropriate exhaust ventilation at places where dust is formed. For precautions see section 2.2. Fireproof. Cool.Prior to working with this chemical you should be trained on its proper handling and storage. Before entering a confined space where this chemical may be present, check to make sure that an explosive concentration does not exist. It must be stored to avoid contact with even small amounts of acids (such as nitric or sulfuric acids); alkalis (such as sodium bydroxide or potassium hydroxide); cataylic anhydrous chlorides of iron, aluminum or tin; iron or aluminum oxide; or metallic potassium hydroxide); catalytic anhydrous chlorides of iron, aluminum or tin; iron or aluminum oxide; or metallic potassium hydroxide, since it may react by itself, liberating much heat and causing a possible explosion. Ethylene oxide should not contact oxidizers (such as perchlorates, perxoides, permanganates, chlorates, and nitrates) since an explosion could occur. Store in tightly closed containers in a cool, well-ventilated area away from heat, sparks, or sunlight. Sources of ignition such as smoking and open flames are prohibited where ethlyene oxide is handled, used, or stored. Metal containers involving the transfer of 5 gallons or more of ethylene oxide should br grounded and bonded. Drums must be equipped with self-closing valves, pressure vacuum bungs, and flame arresters. Use only non-sparking tools and equipment, especially when opening and closing containers of ethylene oxide . Wherever ethylene oxide is used, handled, manufactured, or stored, use explosion-proof electrical equipment and fittings.

  • Exposure controls/personal protection:Occupational Exposure limit valuesRecommended Exposure Limit: 10 Hr Time-Weighted Avg: <0.1 ppm (<0.18 mg/cu m).Recommended Exposure Limit: 10 min/day ceiling value: 5 ppm (9 mg/cu m).NIOSH considers ethylene oxide to be a potential occupational carcinogen.Biological limit values Handle in accordance with good industrial hygiene and safety practice. Wash hands before breaks and at the end of workday. Eye/face protection Safety glasses with side-shields conforming to EN166. Use equipment for eye protection tested and approved under appropriate government standards such as NIOSH (US) or EN 166(EU). Skin protection Wear impervious clothing. The type of protective equipment must be selected according to the concentration and amount of the dangerous substance at the specific workplace. Handle with gloves. Gloves must be inspected prior to use. Use proper glove removal technique(without touching glove's outer surface) to avoid skin contact with this product. Dispose of contaminated gloves after use in accordance with applicable laws and good laboratory practices. Wash and dry hands. The selected protective gloves have to satisfy the specifications of EU Directive 89/686/EEC and the standard EN 374 derived from it. Respiratory protection Wear dust mask when handling large quantities. Thermal hazards

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Relevant articles and documentsAll total 126 Articles be found

Alkali Metal, Chlorine and other Promoters in the Silver-catalysed Selective Oxidation of Ethylene

Grant, Robert B.,Harbach, Christopher A. J.,Lambert, Richard M.,Tan, S. Aun

, p. 2035 - 2046 (1987)

Ethylene oxidation over well characterised Ag(111) surfaces has been investigated by temperature-programmed reaction measurements and by differential batch reactor studies at pressures up to 50 Torr.The influence of chlorine predosing on catalytic activity indicates that a chemisorbed atomic oxygen species is responsible for both partial oxidation and complete oxidation to CO2 + H2O.This tends to be confirmed by experiments using N2O as the oxidant, both with the single crystal specimen and with a practical Ag-αAl2O3 catalyst in a flow microreactor.Dissolved oxygen, like adsorbed chlorine, is found to be a selectivity promoter.Adsorbed Cs also increases the rate of ethylene oxide production but can also positively influence the overall activity of the system.The results suggest that chlorine and dissloved oxygen promoters principally affect the primary chemistry, whereas the main effect of Cs is on the secondary chemistry (further oxidation of ethylene oxide).This view tends to be confirmed by temperature-programmed reaction measurements and by direct experiments on the influence of Cl and Cs on the isomerisation and combustion of ethylene oxide itself.It is suggested that these effects are primarily electronic in origin and a mechanism based on this view is presented.In the presence of Cs, both CO2 and NOx can act as selectivity promoters for the formation of ethylene oxide.

In situ controlled promotion of catalyst surfaces via solid electrolytes: the NEMCA effect

Vayenas,Yentekakis,Bebelis,Neophytides

, p. 1393 - 1401 (1995)

The catalytic activity and selectivity of metal films interfaced with solid electrolytes can be varied in situ in a dramatic and reversible manner by applying currents or voltages (typically ± 1-2 V) between the catalyst film and a counter electrode also

-

Reyerson,Oppenheimer

, p. 290 (1944)

-

A Nanoarchitecture Based on Silver and Copper Oxide with an Exceptional Response in the Chlorine-Promoted Epoxidation of Ethylene

Ramirez, Adrian,Hueso, Jose L.,Suarez, Hugo,Mallada, Reyes,Ibarra, Alfonso,Irusta, Silvia,Santamaria, Jesus

, p. 11158 - 11161 (2016)

The selective oxidation of ethylene to ethylene epoxide is highly challenging as a result of competing reaction pathways leading to the deep oxidation of both ethylene and ethylene oxide. Herein we present a novel catalyst based on silver and copper oxide

Epoxidation of Ethylene over Silver Catalysts modified by Sodium Chloride

Ayame, Akimi,Takeno, Noboru,Kanoh, Hisao

, p. 617 - 618 (1982)

The selectivity of epoxide synthesis in the direct oxidation of ethylene is increased to 85-87percent by addition of sodium chloride to the silver catalyst; this selectivity corresponds to the maximum expected by mechanistic studies.

Study of the Real Structure of Silver Supported Catalysts of Different Dispersity

Tsybulya, S. V.,Kryukova, G. N.,Goncharova, S. N.,Shmakov, A. N.,Bal'zhinimaev, B. S.

, p. 194 - 200 (1995)

The real structure of silver supported catalysts for ethylene epoxidation (Ag/α-Al2O3) was investigated using precision X-ray diffraction on synchrotron radiation, in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy.Stacking f

XPS study of the size effect in ethene epoxidation on supported silver catalysts

Bukhtiyarov, Valery I.,Prosvirin, Igor P.,Kvon, Ren I.,Goncharova, Svetlana N.,Bal'zhinimaev, Bair S.

, p. 2323 - 2329 (1997)

Supported silver catalysts (Ag/α-Al2O3) with different particle sizes (100-1000 A?) have been prepared and studied by XPS. It has been shown that the increase in the ethene epoxidation rate with silver particle size (size effect) is

Direct conversion of ethane to ethylene oxide over Ni-Ag-O catalyst

Wu, Ying,Wu, Binfu,He, Yiming,Wu, Tinghua

, p. 284 - 285 (2009)

Ethylene oxide was directly synthesized by oxidation of ethane over Ni-Ag-O catalyst with ethane conversion of 10% and ethylene oxide yield of 1.2% at 310°C. NiOx and Ag in the catalyst favor ethane activation and the formation of ethylene oxid

Cs-Promoted Ag(111): Model Studies of Selective Ethylene Oxidation Catalysts

Campbell, Charles T.

, p. 5789 - 5795 (1985)

The role of cesium promoters in silver catalysts for the selective epoxidation of ethylene (C2H4 + 1/2O2 -> C2H4O) has been studied by using adsorbed cesium on the surface of clean Ag(111) as a model catalysts.The experiments are performed in an apparatus

Transition Structures of Epoxidation by CH3Re(O)2(O2) and CH3Re(O)(O2)2 and Their Water Adducts

Wu, Yun-Dong,Sun, Jian

, p. 1752 - 1753 (1998)

-

Orzechowski,MacCormack

, p. 388,393,432,443 (1954)

-

Swain et al.

, p. 2353,2357,2358 (1959)

-

Thio Diels-Alder reactions of α,β-unsaturated 1,3-oxathiolanes with aliphatic olefins and 1,3-dienes

Kerverdo, Sébastien,Lizzani-Cuvelier, Louisette,Du?ach, Elisabet

, p. 8841 - 8844 (2003)

A series of α,β-unsaturated 1,3-oxathiolanes reacted with aliphatic olefins such as norbornene and with various 1,3-dienes in the presence of TiCl4 leading to dihydrothiapyrans, via a cycloaddition-type reaction. The unsaturated oxathiolanes acted as masked heterodienes in this thio Diels-Alder reaction.

-

Twigg et al.

, p. 699,704 (1952)

-

Wan

, p. 234 (1953)

-

Ballinger,Long

, p. 2347,2349 (1959)

-

-

Force,Bell

, p. 175,176-178 (1976)

-

PRODUCTION PROCESS OF ALKYLENE OXIDES FROM ALKYLENE CARBONATES

-

Page/Page column 10-12, (2022/04/03)

Catalytic process for producing alkylene epoxide, selected between ethylene oxide or propylene oxide, from the corresponding alkylene carbonate, selected between ethylene carbonate or propylene carbonate, comprising the decomposition reaction of alkylene carbonate, in the presence of sodium bromide as catalyst, in which: the reaction temperature is between 207 and 245°C, and the catalyst is in amounts comprised between 5x10-4 and 8x10-3 moles per mole of alkylene carbonate. This process can be carried out continuously. A further object of the invention is the modular plant which allows carrying out such a process.

PROCESS FOR PRODUCING ETHYLENE OXIDE FROM ETHANE BY OXIDATIVE DEHYDROGENATION AND EPOXIDATION WITH SPLIT RECYCLE

-

Paragraph 0079; 0083, (2021/09/17)

An ethylene oxide (EO) production process comprising (a) introducing a first reactant mixture (C2H6, O2) to a first reactor to produce a first effluent stream (C2H4,C2H6,O2); (b) introducing a second reactant mixture to a second reactor to produce a second effluent stream (EO, C2H4,C2H6,O2); wherein the second reactant mixture comprises at least a portion of first effluent stream; (c) separating the second effluent stream into an EO product stream (EO) and recycle stream (C2H4,C2H6,O2); wherein ethylene is not separated from recycle stream and/or first effluent stream; and (d) recycling a first portion of recycle stream to the first reactor, and a second portion of recycle stream to the second reactor; wherein recycle split ratio 0.6; and wherein recycle split ratio is defined as ratio of volumetric flowrate of first portion of recycle stream divided by the sum of volumetric flowrates of first portion and second portion of recycle stream.

Epoxidation of Ethylene with Products of Thermal Gas-Phase Oxidation of n-Butane

Arsentev, S. D.,Grigoryan, R. R.

, p. 187 - 193 (2020/03/30)

Abstract: Epoxidation of ethylene with the reactive products formed during thermal gas-phase oxidation of n-butane has been carried out under flow conditions with the separation of the zones of generation of radicals and their interaction with ethylene. Butane is oxidized in the first section of a two-section reactor, and ethylene is fed to the second section. It has been found that increasing the residence time of a butane–oxygen mixture in the first section of the reactor from 7 to 13 s increases the ethylene oxide accumulation rate. A further increase in the contact time leads to a decrease in the rate. Similarly, increasing the C4H10/O2 ratio in the range of 0.05–0.25 leads to an increase in the rate of accumulation of ethylene oxide. A further increase in this ratio decreases the rate of epoxidation. It has also been found that the temperature dependences of the ethylene oxide accumulation rate in both sections of the reactor pass through a maximum. The obtained data give evidence for the occurrence of the ethylene epoxidation reaction initiated by the n-butane oxidation products under the conditions when ethylene itself is slightly oxidized.

Chemical Behaviour of CaAg2 under Ethylene Epoxidation Conditions

Antonyshyn, Iryna,Sichevych, Olga,Rasim, Karsten,Ormeci, Alim,Burkhardt, Ulrich,Titlbach, Sven,Schunk, Stephan Andreas,Armbrüster, Marc,Grin, Yuri

, p. 3933 - 3941 (2018/09/10)

The binary compound CaAg2 is examined as a catalyst for the ethylene epoxidation reaction. During the induction phase, conversion and selectivity increase and then remain stable for several hundred hours. The presence of ethyl chloride as a promoter is crucial. The pristine CaAg2 reacts with the gaseous reactants and forms a porous microstructure of calcium-containing oxidation products on the surface, in which particles of elemental silver are embedded. The microstructure is remarkably stable, and in particular, prevents further sintering of the silver particles.

Kinetics of Ethylene Epoxidation on a Promoted Ag/α-Al2O3 Catalyst—The Effects of Product and Chloride Co-Feeds on Rates and Selectivity

Chen, Cha-Jung,Harris, James W.,Bhan, Aditya

, p. 12405 - 12415 (2018/08/28)

The overall chloriding effectiveness factor (Z*), defined as the ratio of ethyl chloride concentration in parts per million to the sum of ethylene and ethane concentration in mole percent multiplied by a weighting factor to account for their efficacy in removing chlorine-adatoms from the surface, was used as a parameter to account for the effects of chlorine on the kinetics of ethylene epoxidation on a highly promoted 35 wt % Ag/α-Al2O3 catalyst. An increase in O2 order (≈0.7 to 1) and a decrease in C2H4 order (≈0.5 to 2 activation on chloride-promoted silver catalysts. Carbon dioxide co-feed (1–5 mol %) was found to promote ethylene oxide selectivity as CO2 co-feed reversibly inhibits CO2 synthesis rates (?0.6 order) more than ethylene oxide synthesis rates (?0.49 order) at all Z* values. Ethylene oxide and CO2 rates were found to be invariant with ethylene oxide (0–0.5 mol %) and acetaldehyde (0–1.7 ppm) co-feeds, suggesting that there is minimal product inhibition under reaction conditions. A model involving a common reaction intermediate for ethylene oxide and carbon dioxide synthesis and two types of atomically adsorbed oxygen species—nucleophilic and electrophilic oxygen—is proposed to plausibly describe the observed reaction rate dependencies and selectivity trends as a function of the chloriding effectiveness.

Process route upstream and downstream products

Process route

hexane
110-54-3

hexane

2-ethyltetrahydrofuran
1003-30-1,123931-62-4

2-ethyltetrahydrofuran

2-ethyl-4-methyloxetane
5410-21-9

2-ethyl-4-methyloxetane

2,5-dimethyltetrahydrofuran
1003-38-9

2,5-dimethyltetrahydrofuran

2-methyloxane
10141-72-7

2-methyloxane

1,2-Epoxyhexane
1436-34-6

1,2-Epoxyhexane

2,3-epoxyhexane
1192-32-1

2,3-epoxyhexane

2-propyl-oxetane
4468-64-8

2-propyl-oxetane

methanol
67-56-1

methanol

Ketene
463-51-4

Ketene

ethane
74-84-0

ethane

ethene
74-85-1

ethene

1,2-propanediene
463-49-0

1,2-propanediene

acetaldehyde
75-07-0,9002-91-9

acetaldehyde

acetic acid
64-19-7,77671-22-8

acetic acid

propionic acid
802294-64-0,79-09-4

propionic acid

methyloxirane
75-56-9,16033-71-9

methyloxirane

prop-1-yne
74-99-7

prop-1-yne

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With oxygen; at 376.84 ℃; for 0.000555556h; under 795.08 Torr; Temperature; Inert atmosphere;
Conditions
Conditions Yield
In chlorobenzene; at 150 ℃; for 1h; Mechanism; a new decomposition path of reaction;
Conditions
Conditions Yield
With tert.-butylhydroperoxide; In acetonitrile; at 80 ℃; for 10h; Reagent/catalyst; Temperature; Catalytic behavior;
2,2,2-Trifluoroethyl p-toluenesulfonate
433-06-7

2,2,2-Trifluoroethyl p-toluenesulfonate

ethylene glycol
107-21-1

ethylene glycol

1,1,1-trifluoro-2-(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)ethane
333-36-8

1,1,1-trifluoro-2-(2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy)ethane

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With sodium hydride; In dimethyl sulfoxide; at 20 ℃; for 2h; Product distribution / selectivity;
2-Methylpentane
107-83-5

2-Methylpentane

2,2-dimethyltetrahydrofuran
1003-17-4

2,2-dimethyltetrahydrofuran

2,3-epoxy-2-methylpentane
1192-22-9

2,3-epoxy-2-methylpentane

2,4-Dimethyltetrahydrofuran
64265-26-5

2,4-Dimethyltetrahydrofuran

methanol
67-56-1

methanol

2,2,4-trimethyloxetane
23120-44-7

2,2,4-trimethyloxetane

3-propyloxetane
10317-18-7

3-propyloxetane

2-isopropyloxetane
15045-60-0

2-isopropyloxetane

ethane
74-84-0

ethane

ethene
74-85-1

ethene

1,2-propanediene
463-49-0

1,2-propanediene

acetaldehyde
75-07-0,9002-91-9

acetaldehyde

acetic acid
64-19-7,77671-22-8

acetic acid

acetone
67-64-1

acetone

methyloxirane
75-56-9,16033-71-9

methyloxirane

prop-1-yne
74-99-7

prop-1-yne

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With oxygen; at 351.84 ℃; for 0.000555556h; under 795.08 Torr; Temperature; Inert atmosphere;
Conditions
Conditions Yield
With oxygen; silver based supported catalyst; at 235 ℃; under 15451.5 Torr; Product distribution / selectivity; Gas phase;
With oxygen; silver and caesium based supported catalyst; at 253 ℃; under 15451.5 Torr; Product distribution / selectivity; Gas phase;
Conditions
Conditions Yield
methane; With oxygen; at 709.84 ℃; under 650.315 Torr;
ethene; at 504.84 ℃; under 650.315 Torr;
Conditions
Conditions Yield
With oxygen; at 399.84 ℃; under 650.315 Torr; Temperature;
1,2-propanediene
463-49-0

1,2-propanediene

ethene
74-85-1

ethene

acetaldehyde
75-07-0,9002-91-9

acetaldehyde

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With ozone; at -261.2 ℃; Further byproducts given. Title compound not separated from byproducts; Irradiation;
1,2-propanediene
463-49-0

1,2-propanediene

carbon monoxide
201230-82-2

carbon monoxide

acetaldehyde
75-07-0,9002-91-9

acetaldehyde

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With ozone; at -261.2 ℃; Further byproducts given. Title compound not separated from byproducts; Irradiation;

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