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Cas Database

7664-93-9

7664-93-9

Identification

  • Product Name:Sulfuric acid

  • CAS Number: 7664-93-9

  • EINECS:231-639-5

  • Molecular Weight:98.0795

  • Molecular Formula: H2O4S

  • HS Code:H2SO4 MOL WT. 98.08

  • Mol File:7664-93-9.mol

Synonyms:Dihydrogen sulfate;Dipping acid;NSC 248648;Oil of vitriol;Sulphuric acid;Vitriol brown oil;Sulfuricacid;

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Safety information and MSDS view more

  • Pictogram(s):CorrosiveC

  • Hazard Codes: C:Corrosive;

  • Signal Word:Danger

  • Hazard Statement:H314 Causes severe skin burns and eye damage

  • First-aid measures: General adviceConsult a physician. Show this safety data sheet to the doctor in attendance.If inhaled If breathed in, move person into fresh air. If not breathing, give artificial respiration. Consult a physician. In case of skin contact Wash off with soap and plenty of water. Consult a physician. In case of eye contact Rinse thoroughly with plenty of water for at least 15 minutes and consult a physician. If swallowed Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious person. Rinse mouth with water. Consult a physician.

  • Fire-fighting measures: Suitable extinguishing media Use water spray, alcohol-resistant foam, dry chemical or carbon dioxide. Wear self-contained breathing apparatus for firefighting if necessary.

  • Accidental release measures: Use personal protective equipment. Avoid dust formation. Avoid breathing vapours, mist or gas. Ensure adequate ventilation. Evacuate personnel to safe areas. Avoid breathing dust. For personal protection see section 8. Prevent further leakage or spillage if safe to do so. Do not let product enter drains. Discharge into the environment must be avoided. Pick up and arrange disposal. Sweep up and shovel. Keep in suitable, closed containers for disposal.

  • Handling and storage: Avoid contact with skin and eyes. Avoid formation of dust and aerosols. Avoid exposure - obtain special instructions before use.Provide appropriate exhaust ventilation at places where dust is formed. For precautions see section 2.2. Store in cool place. Keep container tightly closed in a dry and well-ventilated place.

  • Exposure controls/personal protection:Occupational Exposure limit valuesBiological limit values Handle in accordance with good industrial hygiene and safety practice. Wash hands before breaks and at the end of workday. Eye/face protection Safety glasses with side-shields conforming to EN166. Use equipment for eye protection tested and approved under appropriate government standards such as NIOSH (US) or EN 166(EU). Skin protection Wear impervious clothing. The type of protective equipment must be selected according to the concentration and amount of the dangerous substance at the specific workplace. Handle with gloves. Gloves must be inspected prior to use. Use proper glove removal technique(without touching glove's outer surface) to avoid skin contact with this product. Dispose of contaminated gloves after use in accordance with applicable laws and good laboratory practices. Wash and dry hands. The selected protective gloves have to satisfy the specifications of EU Directive 89/686/EEC and the standard EN 374 derived from it. Respiratory protection Wear dust mask when handling large quantities. Thermal hazards

Supplier and reference price

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Relevant articles and documentsAll total 77 Articles be found

Hoenig, M.

, (1885)

Bimetallic Nanostructured Catalysts Prepared by Laser Electrodispersion: Structure and Activity in Redox Reactions

Bryzhin,Golubina,Maslakov,Lokteva,Tarkhanova,Gurevich,Yavsin,Rostovshchikova

, p. 4396 - 4405 (2020)

One-stage size-selective method of laser electrodispersion (LED) was used to produce nanostructured NiPd, NiMo and NiW coatings on the surface of alumina, HOPG and Sibunit for the catalytic application. The deposition of nanoparticles produced by LED of b

Hughes, Martin N.,Lusty, James R.

, (1977)

Deines, O. v.

, p. 145 - 151 (1933)

Luckow, C.

, p. 53 - 57 (1893)

Wet plasma reactor for remidiation of SO2

Seethamsetty,Dhali,Dave, Bakul

, p. 4298 - 4300 (2001)

In pollution control applications, the presence of water in the electrical discharge enhances oxidation of pollutants. The results of an electrical discharge in gas when it flows through a heterogeneous mixture of water and dielectric pellets are reported. The discharge in the wet plasma reactor is more uniform compared to dry dielectric-barrier reactors. The electrical characteristics of such a discharge are discussed. Also the results of removal of SO2 with the wet reactor are reported. The wet reactor was found to be 5-10 times more energy efficient in removing SO2 compared to conventional dry plasma reactors.

Cornog, J.,Henderson, W. E.

, p. 1978 - 1980 (1924)

Metheson, G. L.,Maass, O.

, p. 674 - 687 (1929)

Highly efficient photoinitiation in the cerium(III)-catalyzed aqueous autoxidation of sulfur(IV). An example of comprehensive evaluation of photoinduced chain reactions

Kerezsi, Ildiko,Lente, Gabor,Fabian, Istvan

, p. 4785 - 4793 (2005)

The photoinitiated and cerium(III)-catalyzed aqueous reaction between sulfite ion and oxygen has been studied in a diode-array spectrophotometer using the same light beam for excitation and detection. Cerium(III) is identified as the photoactive absorbing species, and the production of cerium(IV) initiates a radical chain reaction. To interpret all the experimental findings, a simple scheme is proposed, in which the additional chain carriers are sulfite ion radical (SO3-.), sulfate ion radical (SO4 -.), and peroxomonosulfate ion radical (SO5-.). The overall rate of oxidation is proportional to the square root of the light intensity per unit volume, which is readily interpreted by the second-order termination reaction of the proposed scheme. It is also shown that the reaction proceeds for an extended period of time in the dark following illumination, and a quantitative analysis is presented for this phase as well. The postulated model predicts that cerium(III) should have a cocatalytic or synergistic effect on the autoxidation of sulfite ion in the presence of other catalysts. This prediction was confirmed in the iron(III)-sulfite ion-oxygen system. The experimental method and the mathematical treatment used might be applicable to a wide range of photoinduced chain reactions.

Eisenbrand,Lohrscheid

, p. 709,714 (1959)

On synthesis, structure, and thermal stability of mercury and lead sulfates and oxide sulfates

Ahmed,Fjellv?g,Kjekshus

, p. 113 - 121 (2002)

Reactions between HgO, PbO, or PbO2 and 2.5-95 wt.% H2SO4 are studied at temperatures up to the boiling point of the acid. Depending on the oxide reactant, the H2SO4 concentration, and synthesis tempe

Investigation of lead thiosulfate photolysis in aqueous solutions

Egorov

, p. 37 - 41 (2014)

A model of photolysis of PbS2O3 aqueous solutions has been proposed on the basis of identified photolysis products and semiempirical quantum-chemical calculations. The degradation of PbS2O3 starts with the dissociation of the sulfur-sulfur bond in the thiosulfate group via photochemical excitation and transition of the system a whole to the activated state, which is decomposed by the solvent. The interaction of the primary photolysis products with PbS2O3 results in the formation of final products.

Lichty, D. M.

, p. 1834 - 1846 (1908)

Kinetics and Mechanism for the Catalytic Oxidation of Sulfur Dioxide on Carbon in Aqueous Suspensions

Brodzinsky, R.,Chang, S. G.,Markowitz, S. S.,Novakov, T.

, p. 3354 - 3358 (1980)

Combustion-produced soot (carbonaceous) particles have been found to be efficient catalysts for SO2 oxidation, especially in the presence of liquid water.A kinetic study of the catalytic oxidation of SO2 on carbon particles suspended in solution has been carried out.The reaction was found to be first order with respect to the concentration of carbon particles, 0.69th order with respect to dissolved oxygen, between zero and second order with respect to S(IV) concentrations, and independent of the pH.Temperature studies were carried out, and an activation energy for this reaction was determined.A four-step mechanism is proposed for this carbon-catalyzed oxidation reaction.

Marchlewski, L.

, p. 403 - 411 (1893)

Seward, R. P.

, p. 2740 - 2743 (1933)

Toennies, G.

, p. 552 - 555 (1937)

Experimental study of the heterogeneous interaction of SO3 and H2O: Formation of condensed phase molecular sulfuric acid hydrates

Couling, Suzanne B.,Sully, K. Jessica,Horn, Andrew B.

, p. 1994 - 2003 (2003)

The interaction of SO3 and H2O at low temperatures upon an inert surface has been studied with infrared spectroscopy and compared to the predictions of recent computational studies. At low temperatures and low water partial pressures, amorphous deposits of molecular H2SO4 complexed with variable amounts of H2O in a ratio of between 1:1 and 2:1 are formed. Upon annealing, this material ejects water and converts first to a 1:1 H2SO4·H2O complex and subsequently to anhydrous H2SO4. Adding water to the amorphous molecular hydrate results in the formation of a new species, which on the basis of its thermal behavior and by comparison to theoretical predictions can be attributed to a molecular polymer with a repeat unit of (H2SO4·(H2 O)2)n. Implications of these observations for the initial stages of the formation of sulfate aerosol in the atmosphere and their surface reactivity are discussed.

Watt, G. W.,Achorn, S. L.,Marley, J. L.

, p. 3341 - 3343 (1950)

Rate constant of the gas phase reaction of SO3 with H2O

Wang, Xiuyan,Jin, Y. G.,Suto, Masako,Lee, L. C.,O'Neal, H. E.

, p. 4853 - 4860 (1988)

The rate constants for the reaction of S03 with H20 in He and in Nz were measured at total pressures from I-10 Torr in a flow tube at room temperature.The concentration of S03 was monitored by photofragment emission produced by 147 nm excitation.Dependencies of apparent reaction rates on wall conditions and reaction tube sizes were investigated.At total He pressures of 1-10 Torr, a value of ( 5.7 +/- 0.9 ) X 10-15 cm3/s was obtained for the upper limit of the homogeneous gas phase reaction rate constant.This rate value is more than two orders of magnitude lower than the previously published value, but it is consistent with the theoretical calculation provided in this paper.

Kinetics and Mechanism of the Oxidation of Aquated Sulfur Dioxide by Hydrogen Peroxide at Low pH

McArdie, James V.,Hoffmann, Michael R.

, p. 5425 - 5429 (1983)

A stopped-flow kinetic study of the oxidation of sulfur dioxide by hydrogen peroxide was performed over the pH range 0.0-4.5.A rate expression of the following form was verified experimentally: d/dt = k1Ka1(k2+> + k3)/-1 + k2+> + k3)(Ka1 + +>)>.The following kinetic parameters at 15 deg C were determined: k1 = (2.6 +/- 0.5)*106 M-1 s-1, k2/k-1 = 16 +/- 4 M-1, k2/k3 = (5 +/- 1)*102 (HA = acetic acid), ΔH(excit.)1 = 37 +/- 2 kJ mol-1, and ΔS(excit.)1 = 4 +/- 4 J K-1 mol-1.The reaction proceeds via a nucleophilic displacement of HSO3-1 by H2O2 to which undergoes sulfurous acid intermediate which undergoes acid-catalyzed rearrangement to form product: SO2*H2O HSO3- + H+(Ka1), H2O2 + HSO3- HOOSO2- (k1, k-1), HOOSO2- + H+ -> H+ + HSO4- (k2), HOOSO2- + HA -> HA + HSO4- (k3).Application of the above rate expression to reactions occuring in hydrometeors is discussed.

Vernon, W. H. J.

, p. 255 - 277 (1931)

Hattox, E. M.,De Vries, T.

, p. 2126 (1936)

Corriou, Jean-Pierre,Kikindai, Tivadar

, p. 9 - 16 (1981)

Fajans, K.

, p. 357 - 375 (1927)

Bennett, G. M.

, p. 1794 - 1795 (1922)

Selected-control hydrothermal synthesis of γ-MnO2 3D nanostructures

Wu, Changzheng,Xie, Yi,Wang, Dong,Yang, Jun,Li, Tanwei

, p. 13583 - 13587 (2003)

Highly uniform γ-MnO2 3D urchinlike and sisallike nanostructures have been successfully prepared by a common hydrothermal method based on the reaction between MnSO4 and KBrO3. Reaction temperature and the additives of the polymers play an important role in influencing the morphologies of the as-obtained products. These urchinlike and sisallike nanostructures, which own the highly specific area on the surface of the particles may provide more possibility to give an ideal host material for the insertion and extraction of lithium ions, to realize region-dependent surface reactivity, and to act as molecular sieves.

Browne, A. W.,Shetterly, F. F.

, p. 53 - 53 (1908)

-

Jumakaeva, B. S.,Golodov, V. A.

, p. 303 - 308 (1986)

-

Green, L.,Masson, O.

, p. 2083 - 2099 (1910)

Methods for producing a methanol precursor, methanol, and a methyl ester from methane in high purities

-

Page/Page column 11; 12, (2021/06/02)

A method for producing a methanol precursor, methyl trifluoroacetate, having high-purity includes the steps of (a) preparing methyl bisulfate by mixing a catalyst with an acid solution comprising a sulfur-containing acid to provide a first mixture and supplying methane gas to the first mixture to prepare the methyl bisulfate; and (b) preparing methyl trifluoroacetate (CF3CO2CH3) by adding trifluoroacetic acid (CF3CO2H) to the first mixture including the methyl bisulfate to provide a second mixture and distilling the second mixture under heating to prepare, separate and purify the methyl trifluoroacetate (CF3CO2CH3). Methanol may be produced by adding water to the methyl trifluoroacetate (CF3CO2CH3). A methyl ester represented by Formula 2 below may be produced by adding a carboxylic acid represented by Formula 1 below to the methyl trifluoroacetate (CF3CO2CH3): R1CO2H??(1),where R1 is selected from C1-C10 alkyl groups, R1CO2CH3??(2),where R1 is as defined in Formula 1.

Advanced Methods for the Formation of Crust Catalysts for Oxidative Desulfurization

Bryzhin, A. A.,Gurevich, S. A.,Lukiyanchuk, I. V.,Maslakov, K. I.,Rostovshchikova, T. N.,Tarkhanova, I. G.,Ustinov, A. Yu.,Vasilyeva, M. S.,Yavsin, D. A.

, p. 828 - 837 (2022/01/13)

Abstract: The catalytic properties of W- and NiW-layered structures obtained by laser electrodispersion (LED) and plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) are investigated in oxidative desulfurization reactions. A comparative analysis of the effect of the comp

Para-ester synthesis process for recycling hydrogen chloride

-

Paragraph 0086; 0092-0106; 0112-0126; 0132-0146; 0152-0166, (2020/05/01)

The invention discloses a para-ester synthesis process capable of recycling hydrogen chloride, which is characterized by comprising the following steps: (1) preparing chlorosulfonic acid; absorbing the hydrogen chloride gas generated in the chlorosulfonation link through an original HCl absorption tower, and resolving to generate pure hydrogen chloride gas; reacting the hydrogen chloride gas withpure sulfur trioxide gas in a primary reaction tower to obtain gaseous chlorosulfonic acid; condensing the gaseous chlorosulfonic acid and entering in a secondary reaction tower, and fully reacting aside reaction product in the primary reaction tower with excessive sulfur trioxide and hydrogen chloride to further generate chlorosulfonic acid; (2) preparing para-ester; preparing chlorosulfonated substances in a sulfonation reaction kettle; diluting and carrying out suction filtration, and then carrying out a reduction reaction, a condensation reaction and an esterification reaction to preparethe para-ester. The hydrogen chloride generated in the chlorosulfonation link is recovered and reacts with sulfur trioxide gas to prepare chlorosulfonic acid, the chlorosulfonic acid serves as a raw material in the chlorosulfonation link, the para-ester is further prepared, and cyclic utilization is achieved.

Pt black catalyzed methane oxidation to methyl bisulfate in H2SO4-SO3

Lee, Hee Won,Dang, Huyen Tran,Kim, Honggon,Lee, Ung,Ha, Jeong-Myeong,Jae, Jungho,Cheong, Minserk,Lee, Hyunjoo

, p. 230 - 236 (2019/05/17)

Although chloride-ligated Pt compounds like (bpym)PtCl2, K2PtCl4, and (DMSO)2PtCl2 has been reported to be highly active catalysts for the methane oxidation to methyl bisulfate (MBS) in oleum media, their applications is hampered by the catalyst deactivation to PtCl2. In this study, we investigated Pt black catalyzed methane oxidation, which has no ligand. A MBS yield of 82.1% with a selectivity of 96.5% was obtained at a catalyst loading of 1.6 mM at 180 °C, which proved the highest catalytic activity of Pt-black for this reaction. The reaction was thought to proceed by the dissolved Pt species, and no deactivation was observed during four consecutive experiments. However, at a concentration of over 30 mM, MBS yield fell due to the decomposition of MBS to CO2 on the surface of heterogeneous Pt(0). Vacuum distillation experiments showed the potential for isolating MBS from the oxidation product mixture as a major component.

Process route upstream and downstream products

Process route

bromocyane
506-68-3

bromocyane

water
7732-18-5

water

hydrogen cyanide
74-90-8

hydrogen cyanide

sulfuric acid
7664-93-9

sulfuric acid

hydrogen bromide
10035-10-6,12258-64-9

hydrogen bromide

Conditions
Conditions Yield
1-bromo-2-hydroxy-ethanesulfonic acid

1-bromo-2-hydroxy-ethanesulfonic acid

carbon dioxide
124-38-9,18923-20-1

carbon dioxide

sulfuric acid
7664-93-9

sulfuric acid

hydrogen bromide
10035-10-6,12258-64-9

hydrogen bromide

Conditions
Conditions Yield
1-bromo-ethenesulfonic acid
97925-62-7

1-bromo-ethenesulfonic acid

carbon dioxide
124-38-9,18923-20-1

carbon dioxide

sulfuric acid
7664-93-9

sulfuric acid

water
7732-18-5

water

hydrogen bromide
10035-10-6,12258-64-9

hydrogen bromide

Conditions
Conditions Yield
1-bromo-ethenesulfonic acid
97925-62-7

1-bromo-ethenesulfonic acid

carbon dioxide
124-38-9,18923-20-1

carbon dioxide

sulfuric acid
7664-93-9

sulfuric acid

water
7732-18-5

water

hydrogen bromide
10035-10-6,12258-64-9

hydrogen bromide

Conditions
Conditions Yield
1-bromo-ethenesulfonic acid
97925-62-7

1-bromo-ethenesulfonic acid

carbon dioxide
124-38-9,18923-20-1

carbon dioxide

sulfuric acid
7664-93-9

sulfuric acid

water
7732-18-5

water

hydrogen bromide
10035-10-6,12258-64-9

hydrogen bromide

Conditions
Conditions Yield
cyanogen iodide
506-78-5

cyanogen iodide

sulphurous acid
7782-99-2

sulphurous acid

hydrogen cyanide
74-90-8

hydrogen cyanide

sulfuric acid
7664-93-9

sulfuric acid

hydrogen iodide
10034-85-2

hydrogen iodide

Conditions
Conditions Yield
bis(2-chloroethyl) trisulfide
19149-77-0

bis(2-chloroethyl) trisulfide

2-chloroethanesulphonic acid
18024-00-5

2-chloroethanesulphonic acid

sulfuric acid
7664-93-9

sulfuric acid

Conditions
Conditions Yield
at 0 ℃;
methyl hydroperoxide
3031-73-0

methyl hydroperoxide

sulphurous acid
7782-99-2

sulphurous acid

sulfuric acid
7664-93-9

sulfuric acid

Conditions
Conditions Yield
sulfuric acid bis-(2-bromo-ethyl ester)

sulfuric acid bis-(2-bromo-ethyl ester)

water
7732-18-5

water

sulfuric acid
7664-93-9

sulfuric acid

hydrogen bromide
10035-10-6,12258-64-9

hydrogen bromide

ethylene glycol
107-21-1

ethylene glycol

Conditions
Conditions Yield
bis-tribromomethyl trisulfide
116277-70-4

bis-tribromomethyl trisulfide

water
7732-18-5

water

bromine
7726-95-6

bromine

carbon oxide sulfide
463-58-1

carbon oxide sulfide

sulfuric acid
7664-93-9

sulfuric acid

hydrogen bromide
10035-10-6,12258-64-9

hydrogen bromide

methylammonium carbonate
15719-64-9,15719-76-3,97762-63-5

methylammonium carbonate

Conditions
Conditions Yield
at 100 ℃;

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