Welcome to LookChem.com Sign In|Join Free

Cas Database

124-38-9

124-38-9

Identification

  • Product Name:Carbon dioxide

  • CAS Number: 124-38-9

  • EINECS:204-696-9

  • Molecular Weight:44.0098

  • Molecular Formula: CO2

  • HS Code:28112100

  • Mol File:124-38-9.mol

Synonyms:Carbonoxide (CO2);Carbon-12 dioxide;Carbon-12C dioxide-16O2;Carbonic acidanhydride;Carbonic acid gas;Carbonic anhydride;Dry ice;EN 439C1;Khladon744;R 744;

Post Buying Request Now
Entrust LookChem procurement to find high-quality suppliers faster

Safety information and MSDS view more

  • Signal Word:Warning

  • Hazard Statement:H280 Contains gas under pressure; may explode if heated

  • First-aid measures: General adviceConsult a physician. Show this safety data sheet to the doctor in attendance.If inhaled Fresh air, rest. Artificial respiration may be needed. Refer for medical attention. In case of skin contact ON FROSTBITE: rinse with plenty of water, do NOT remove clothes. Refer for medical attention . In case of eye contact Rinse thoroughly with plenty of water for at least 15 minutes and consult a physician. If swallowed Never give anything by mouth to an unconscious person. Rinse mouth with water. Consult a physician. Inhalation causes increased respiration rate, headache, subtle physiological changes for up to 5% concentration and prolonged exposure. Higher concentrations can cause unconsciousness and death. Solid can cause cold contact burns. Liquid or cold gas can cause freezing injury to skin or eyes similar to a burn. (USCG, 1999)Excerpt from ERG Guide 120 [Gases - Inert (Including Refrigerated Liquids)]: Vapors may cause dizziness or asphyxiation without warning. Vapors from liquefied gas are initially heavier than air and spread along ground. Contact with gas or liquefied gas may cause burns, severe injury and/or frostbite. (ERG, 2016)Excerpt from ERG Guide 120 [Gases - Inert (Including Refrigerated Liquids)]: Vapors may cause dizziness or asphyxiation without warning. Vapors from liquefied gas are initially heavier than air and spread along ground. Contact with gas or liquefied gas may cause burns, severe injury and/or frostbite. (ERG, 2016) Immediate first aid: Ensure that adequate decontamination has been carried out. If patient is not breathing, start artificial respiration, preferably with a demand-valve resuscitator, bag-valve-mask device, or pocket mask, as trained. Perform CPR as necessary. Immediately flush contaminated eyes with gently flowing water. Do not induce vomiting. If vomiting occurs, lean patient forward or place on left side (head-down position, if possible) to maintain an open airway and prevent aspiration. Keep patient quiet and maintain normal body temperature. Obtain medical attention. /Simple asphyxiants and related compounds/

  • Fire-fighting measures: Suitable extinguishing media Suitable extinguishing media: Use water spray, alcohol-resistant foam, dry chemical or carbon dioxide. Behavior in Fire: Containers may explode when heated. (USCG, 1999)Excerpt from ERG Guide 120 [Gases - Inert (Including Refrigerated Liquids)]: Non-flammable gases. Containers may explode when heated. Ruptured cylinders may rocket. (ERG, 2016)Excerpt from ERG Guide 120 [Gases - Inert (Including Refrigerated Liquids)]: Non-flammable gases. Containers may explode when heated. Ruptured cylinders may rocket. (ERG, 2016) Wear self-contained breathing apparatus for firefighting if necessary.

  • Accidental release measures: Use personal protective equipment. Avoid dust formation. Avoid breathing vapours, mist or gas. Ensure adequate ventilation. Evacuate personnel to safe areas. Avoid breathing dust. For personal protection see section 8. Personal protection: self-contained breathing apparatus. Ventilation. Do NOT use water. Accidental release measures. Personal precautions, protective equipment and emergency procedures: Avoid breathing vapors, mist or gas. Ensure adequate ventilation. Evacuate personnel to safe areas.; Environmental precautions: Do not let product enter drains.; Methods and materials for containment and cleaning up: Clean up promptly by sweeping or vacuum.

  • Handling and storage: Avoid contact with skin and eyes. Avoid formation of dust and aerosols. Avoid exposure - obtain special instructions before use.Provide appropriate exhaust ventilation at places where dust is formed. For precautions see section 2.2. Fireproof if in building. Cool. Ventilation along the floor.Conditions for safe storage, including any incompatibilities: Keep container tightly closed in a dry and well-ventilated place. Contents under pressure. Avoid heating above: 50°C.

  • Exposure controls/personal protection:Occupational Exposure limit valuesRecommended Exposure Limit: 10 Hr Time-Weighted Avg: 5,000 ppm (9,000 mg/cu m).Recommended Exposure Limit: 15 Min Short-Term Exposure Limit: 30,000 ppm (54,000 mg/cu m).10 hr Time-Weighted avg: 10,000 ppm (18,000 mg/cu m); 10 min Ceiling value: 30,000 ppm (54,000 mg/cu m).Biological limit values Handle in accordance with good industrial hygiene and safety practice. Wash hands before breaks and at the end of workday. Eye/face protection Safety glasses with side-shields conforming to EN166. Use equipment for eye protection tested and approved under appropriate government standards such as NIOSH (US) or EN 166(EU). Skin protection Wear impervious clothing. The type of protective equipment must be selected according to the concentration and amount of the dangerous substance at the specific workplace. Handle with gloves. Gloves must be inspected prior to use. Use proper glove removal technique(without touching glove's outer surface) to avoid skin contact with this product. Dispose of contaminated gloves after use in accordance with applicable laws and good laboratory practices. Wash and dry hands. The selected protective gloves have to satisfy the specifications of EU Directive 89/686/EEC and the standard EN 374 derived from it. Respiratory protection Wear dust mask when handling large quantities. Thermal hazards

Supplier and reference price

  • Manufacture/Brand
  • Product Description
  • Packaging
  • Price
  • Delivery
  • Purchase
  • Manufacture/Brand:Sigma-Aldrich
  • Product Description:Carbon-12C dioxide 13C-depleted
  • Packaging:25l
  • Price:$ 602
  • Delivery:In stock
  • Buy Now
  • Manufacture/Brand:Sigma-Aldrich
  • Product Description:Carbon-12C dioxide 13C-depleted
  • Packaging:10l
  • Price:$ 344
  • Delivery:In stock
  • Buy Now
  • Manufacture/Brand:Sigma-Aldrich
  • Product Description:Carbon-12C dioxide 99.9 atom % 12C
  • Packaging:10l-eu
  • Price:$ 342
  • Delivery:In stock
  • Buy Now
  • Manufacture/Brand:Sigma-Aldrich
  • Product Description:Carbon dioxide ≥99.8%
  • Packaging:227g
  • Price:$ 312
  • Delivery:In stock
  • Buy Now
  • Manufacture/Brand:Sigma-Aldrich
  • Product Description:Carbon dioxide (99.8%) cylinder of 48?L, analytical standard
  • Packaging:48 L
  • Price:$ 286
  • Delivery:In stock
  • Buy Now
  • Manufacture/Brand:Sigma-Aldrich
  • Product Description:Carbon dioxide (99.8%) cylinder of 48?L, analytical standard
  • Packaging:501298
  • Price:$ 267
  • Delivery:In stock
  • Buy Now
  • Manufacture/Brand:Sigma-Aldrich
  • Product Description:Carbon dioxide (99.8%) cylinder of 14?L, analytical standard
  • Packaging:14 L
  • Price:$ 188
  • Delivery:In stock
  • Buy Now
  • Manufacture/Brand:Sigma-Aldrich
  • Product Description:Carbon dioxide (99.8%) cylinder of 14?L, analytical standard
  • Packaging:23402
  • Price:$ 175
  • Delivery:In stock
  • Buy Now
  • Manufacture/Brand:American Custom Chemicals Corporation
  • Product Description:CARBON DIOXIDE STANDARD 95.00%
  • Packaging:227G
  • Price:$ 4290.25
  • Delivery:In stock
  • Buy Now

Relevant articles and documentsAll total 3958 Articles be found

CO activation pathways and the mechanism of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

Ojeda, Manuel,Nabar, Rahul,Nilekar, Anand U.,Ishikawa, Akio,Mavrikakis, Manos,Iglesia, Enrique

, p. 287 - 297 (2010)

Unresolved mechanistic details of monomer formation in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) and of its oxygen rejection routes are addressed here by combining kinetic and theoretical analyses of elementary steps on representative Fe and Co surfaces saturated w

Reactivity of Silanes with (tBuPONOP)Ruthenium Dichloride: Facile Synthesis of Chloro-Silyl Ruthenium Compounds and Formic Acid Decomposition

Anderson, Nickolas H.,Boncella, James M.,Tondreau, Aaron M.

, p. 13617 - 13622 (2017)

The coordination of tBuPONOP (tBuPONOP=2,6-bis(ditert-butylphosphinito)pyridine) to different ruthenium starting materials, to generate (tBuPONOP)RuCl2, was investigated. The resultant (tBuPONOP)RuCl

Photocatalytic reactions under irradiation of visible light over gold nanoparticles supported on titanium(IV) oxide powder prepared by using a multi-step photodeposition method

Tanaka, Atsuhiro,Sakaguchi, Satoshi,Hashimoto, Keiji,Kominami, Hiroshi

, p. 1931 - 1938 (2014)

Titanium(IV) oxide (TiO2) having both smaller and larger gold (Au) particles was successfully prepared by a multi-step (MS) photodeposition method. When 0.25 wt% Au loading per photodeposition was repeated four times, smaller and larger Au particles having average diameters of 1.4 and 13 nm, respectively, were fixed on TiO2, and the Au/TiO2 sample exhibited strong photoabsorption around 550 nm due to surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the larger Au particles. Various Au/TiO2 samples were prepared by changing the Au loading per photodeposition and the number of photodepositions. Effects of the conditions in MS photodeposition and sample calcination on Au particle distribution and photoabsorption properties were investigated. These samples were used for hydrogen (H2) formation from 2-propanol and mineralization of acetic acid in aqueous suspensions under irradiation of visible light. In the case of H2 formation under deaerated conditions, the reaction rate of Au/TiO2 having both larger and smaller particles was 4 times higher than that of the Au/TiO2 sample without smaller Au particles, indicating that smaller Au particles acted effectively as a co-catalyst, that is, as reduction sites for H2 evolution. On the other hand, in the case of mineralization of acetic acid under aerated conditions, carbon dioxide formation rates were independent of the presence of smaller Au particles, indicating that the smaller Au particles had little effect on the mineralization of acetic acid. To extend the possibility of Au/TiO2 for H2 formation under irradiation of visible light, H2 formation from ammonia (NH3) as biomass waste was examined under deaerated conditions; NH3 was decomposed to H 2 and nitrogen with a stoichiometric ratio of 3:1. The Royal Society of Chemistry 2014.

Study on the kinetics of thermal decomposition of CaCO3

Wei,Luo

, p. 303 - 310 (1995)

By means of TG, the thermal decomposition of the powdered CaCO3 was tested with its various dispersities, range of size, and the different content of CO2 in flowing nitrogen. Formulae for calculating the rate and time of decomposition were obtained.

Autothermal reforming of CH4 over supported Ni catalysts prepared from Mg-Al hydrotalcite-like anionic clay

Takehira, Katsuomi,Shishido, Tetsuya,Wang, Peng,Kosaka, Tokuhisa,Takaki, Ken

, p. 43 - 54 (2004)

spc-Ni/MgAl (spc: solid-phase crystallization method) catalysts were prepared from Mg-Al hydrotalcite-like compounds containing Ni at the Mg site as the precursors and tested for partial oxidation of CH4 into synthesis gas. The activity of spc-

Synthesis of four-angle star-like CoAl-MMO/BiVO4 p-n heterojunction and its application in photocatalytic desulfurization

Yun, Limin,Yang, Zhanxu,Yu, Zong-Bao,Cai, Tianfeng,Li, Yue,Guo, Changyou,Qi, Chengyuan,Ren, Tieqiang

, p. 25455 - 25460 (2017)

A four-angle star-like Co-Al mixed metal oxide (CoAl-MMO)/BiVO4 heterojunction has been synthesized via a hydrothermal method and following sintering. The CoAl-MMO/BiVO4 is derived from CoAl-LDHs/BiVO4, in which CoAl-LDHs leads to a distribution of amorphous CoAl-MMO. The CoAl-MMO loading on BiVO4 greatly enhances visible light absorption, improves charge separation by band offset charge transfer, and makes flat band potential more negative. The three effects together result in excellent photocatalytic activity. Under visible light irradiation, desulfurization efficiency of thiophene has achieved up to 98.58% on CoAl-MMO/BiVO4 with molar ratio of 0.3:5.

Structure of surface tantalate species and photo-oxidation of carbon monoxide over silica-supported tantalum oxide

Tanaka, Tsunehiro,Nojima, Hiroyuki,Yamamoto, Takashi,Takenaka, Sakae,Funabiki, Takuzo,Yoshida, Satohiro

, p. 5235 - 5239 (1999)

Tantalum oxide (10 wt.% as Ta2O5) supported on silica was prepared and the structure and the photo-oxidation of carbon monoxide over the catalyst sample were investigated. XAFS analysis showed that surface tantalate is a TaO4 tetrahedral species with a Ta=O bond which is a photoactive center. The initiation of the photo-oxidation of carbon monoxide is the photoadsorption of an oxygen molecule on the catalyst sample, elucidated by photoluminescence. EPR spectroscopy showed that the photo-excited center interacts with an oxygen molecule to form a T-type ozonide ion. A carbon monoxide ion attacks the ozonide ion to form an [O3-CO]- paramagnetic intermediate to lead the production of carbon dioxide.

Catalytic properties of γ-Al2O3 supported Pt-FeOx catalysts for complete oxidation of formaldehyde at ambient temperature

Cui, Weiyi,Yuan, Xiaoling,Wu, Ping,Zheng, Bin,Zhang, Wenxiang,Jia, Mingjun

, p. 104330 - 104336 (2015)

A series of γ-Al2O3 supported Pt-FeOx catalysts (Pt-FeOx/Al2O3) with different Fe/Pt atom ratios were prepared, and their catalytic properties were investigated in the oxidation of formaldehyde. It was found that the catalytic activities of Pt-FeOx/Al2O3 catalysts are varied with the change of Fe/Pt ratios. Among them, the sample with a Fe/Pt ratio of 1.0 exhibits the highest activity, which can efficiently convert formaldehyde to CO2 at ambient temperature. The catalytic activity of the Pt-FeOx/Al2O3 catalyst can be further improved by the addition of water vapor into the feed stream. A variety of characterization results showed that both Pt nanoparticles and FeOx species are highly dispersed on the surface of the γ-Al2O3 support. Changing Fe/Pt ratios could influence the chemical states and the redox properties of Pt and Fe species. The catalysts with appropriate Fe/Pt ratios have more accessible active sites, i.e., the Pt-O-Fe species, which are located at the boundaries between FeOx and Pt nanoparticles, thus showing high activity for the oxidation of formaldehyde under ambient conditions.

Purification and characterization of urease from dehusked pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L) seeds.

Das, Nilanjana,Kayastha, Arvind M,Srivastava, Punit K

, p. 513 - 521 (2002)

Urease has been purified from the dehusked seeds of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.) to apparent electrophoretic homogeneity with approximately 200 fold purification, with a specific activity of 6.24 x10(3) U mg(-1) protein. The enzyme was purified by the sequence of steps, namely, first acetone fractionation, acid step, a second acetone fractionation followed by gel filtration and anion-exchange chromatographies. Single band was observed in both native- and SDS-PAGE. The molecular mass estimated for the native enzyme was 540 kDa whereas subunit values of 90 kDa were determined. Hence, urease is a hexamer of identical subunits. Nickel was observed in the purified enzyme from atomic absorption spectroscopy with approximately 2 nickel ions per enzyme subunit. Both jack bean and soybean ureases are serologically related to pigeonpea urease. The amino acid composition of pigeonpea urease shows high acidic amino acid content. The N-terminal sequence of pigeonpea urease, determined up to the 20th residue, was homologous to that of jack bean and soybean seed ureases. The optimum pH was 7.3 in the pH range 5.0-8.5. Pigeonpea urease shows K(m) for urea of 3.0+/-0.2 mM in 0.05 M Tris-acetate buffer, pH 7.3, at 37 degrees C. The turnover number, k(cat), was observed to be 6.2 x 10(4) s(-1) and k(cat)/K(m) was 2.1 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1). Pigeonpea urease shows high specificity for its primary substrate urea.

The effect of the particle size on the kinetics of CO electrooxidation on high surface area Pt catalysts

Arenz, Matthias,Mayrhofer, Karl J. J.,Stamenkovic, Vojislav,Blizanac, Berislav B.,Tomoyuki, Tada,Ross, Phil N.,Markovic, Nenad M.

, p. 6819 - 6829 (2005)

Using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM), infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), and electrochemical (EC) measurements, platinum nanoparticles ranging in size from 1 to 30 nm are characterized and their catalytic activity for CO electrooxidation is evaluated. TEM analysis reveals that Pt crystallites are not perfect cubooctahedrons, and that large particles have rougher surfaces than small particles, which have some fairly smooth (111) facets. The importance of defect sites for the catalytic properties of nanoparticles is probed in IRAS experiments by monitoring how the vibrational frequencies of atop CO (νCO) as well as the concomitant development of dissolved CO 2 are affected by the number of defects on the Pt nanoparticles. It is found that defects play a significant role in CO clustering on nanoparticles, causing CO to decrease/increase in local coverage, which yields to anomalous redshift/ blueshift νCO frequency deviations from the normal Stark-tuning behavior. The observed deviations are accompanied by CO2 production, which increases by increasing the number of defects on the nanoparticles, that is, 1 ≤ 2 ad on defect sites rather than by CO energetics. These results are complemented by chronoamperometric and rotating disk electrode (RDE) data. In contrast to CO stripping experiments, we found that in the backsweep of CO bulk oxidation, the activity increases with decreasing particle size, that is, with increasing oxophilicity of the particles.

Catalytic low-temperature combustion of dichloromethane over V-Ni/TiO2 catalyst

Zhang, Xinhua,Pei, Zhiying,Ning, Xingjie,Lu, Hanfeng,Huang, Haifeng

, p. 79192 - 79199 (2015)

Vanadium-nickel mixed oxides supported on TiO2 (anatase) were prepared by wet impregnation using ammonium metavanadate and nickel nitrate aqueous solution. The performance of as-prepared samples in catalytic dichloromethane (DCM) combustion was investigated, and their physicochemical properties were characterized in detail by X-ray diffraction, N2 physisorption, H2 temperature-programmed reduction, NH3 temperature-programmed desorption, and Raman spectroscopy analyses. Results showed DCM combustion activity over V-Ni/TiO2 catalyst was superior to that of V2O5/TiO2 and NiO/TiO2 catalysts. DCM could be completely converted into CO2, HCl, and a little amount of CO over Ni-V/TiO2 catalyst at 350 °C, the toxic by-products, such as CH3Cl, aldehydes and phosgene could not be observed by online IR spectroscopy. The high catalytic activity, selectivity, and stability of V-Ni/TiO2 catalyst could be due to the good oxidative dehydrogenation ability (ODH), the good reducibility of active oxygen species, and suitable strength of Lewis acidic sites upon introduction of nickel oxide.

Low temperature synthesis of tungsten trioxide/bismuth tungstate heterojunction with enhanced photocatalytic activity

Wang, Yue,Liu, Yan-Jun,Li, Shao-Yang,Ye, Mao,Shao, Yin-Hua,Wang, Rong,Guo, Li-Feng,Zhao, Cui-E,Wei, Ang

, p. 5520 - 5524 (2017)

In this paper, the heterostructure composed of tungsten trioxide (WO3) and bismuth tungstate (Bi2WO6) was synthesized by a hydrothermal treatment at low temperature of 95°C. The orthorhombic Bi2WO6 was formed on the surface of WO3 through a substitution of H2O molecules with [Bi2O2]2+ during the hydrothermal process. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that an intimate interface was observed between the heterojunction of WO3 and Bi2WO6. The WO3/Bi2WO6 showed more UV-visible light absorption and higher photocatalytic performance compared with pure WO3 and Bi2WO6. The efficient separation of electron-hole pairs because of the special structure and spectral property of the WO3/Bi2 WO6 heterojunction might account for the enhanced photocatalytic activity.

Polyethylene glycol-doped BiZn2VO6 as a high-efficiency solar-light-activated photocatalyst with substantial durability toward photodegradation of organic contaminations

Pirhashemi, Mahsa,Elhag, Sami,Habibi-Yangjeh, Aziz,Pozina, Galia,Willander, Magnus,Nur, Omer

, p. 37480 - 37491 (2018)

In this study, we focus on a simple, low-priced, and mild condition hydrothermal route to construct BiZn2VO6 nanocompounds (NCs) as a novel photocatalyst with strong solar light absorption ability for environmental purification using solar energy. NCs were further doped with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to improve their photocatalytic efficiency for photodegradation processes through inhibition of fast charge carrier recombination rates and higher charge separation efficiency. Surface morphology, phase structure, optical characteristics, and band structure of the as-prepared samples were analyzed using XRD, EDX, XPS, SEM, UV-vis spectroscopy, CL, and BET techniques. PEG-doped BiZn2VO6 NCs were applied as effective materials to degrade various kinds of organic pollutants including cationic and anionic types, and these NCs exhibited excellent photocatalytic efficiency as compared to traditional photocatalysts. In particular, the PEG-doped BiZn2VO6 (0.10% w/v) photocatalyst exhibited highly enhanced photocatalytic performance with improvements of about 46.4, 28.3, and 7.23 folds compared with PEG-doped ZnO nanorods (NRs), pristine BiVO4, and BiZn2VO6 samples, respectively, for the decomposition of congo red (CR) dye. After 40 minutes of sunlight irradiation, 97.4% of CR was decomposed. In this study, scavenging experiments indicated that both hydroxyl radicals and holes play dominant roles in CR photodegradation under simulated solar light irradiation. Meanwhile, the optimal photocatalyst demonstrated good reproducibility and stability for successive cycles of photocatalysis.

Regulation of mixed Ag valence state by non-thermal plasma for complete oxidation of formaldehyde

Gan, Yanling,Huang, Haibao,Ji, Jian,Li, Kai

, (2021)

Formaldehyde is an important air pollutant and its removal is essential to protect human health and meet environmental regulations. Ag-based catalyst has a considerable potential for HCHO oxidation in low temperature range. The valence state of Ag is one of the key roles in formaldehyde catalytic oxidation. However, its effect on activity is still ambiguous. Non-thermal plasma and conventional calcination were employed to regulate Ag valence state in this study. Three Ag-Co/CeO2 catalysts with totally different distribution of Ag species were obtained. A special mixed Ag valence state, ~50% Agδ+ with a few Ag0 and Ag+, was achieved by plasma activation. It had the merits of both good activity and stability. A close relationship between Ag valence state and the activity for HCHO oxidation was established. The activity of different Ag species follows the order: Agδ+ + Ag0 + Ag+ > Agδ+ > Ag0 > Ag+.

Highly efficient Pd-ZnO catalyst doubly promoted by CNTs and Sc 2O3 for methanol steam reforming

Yang, Lu,Lin, Guo-Dong,Zhang, Hong-Bin

, p. 137 - 144 (2013)

A type of Pd-ZnO catalyst doubly promoted by CNTs and Sc2O 3 for methanol steam reforming (MSR) was developed, and displayed excellent activity and operation stability for the selective formation of H 2 and CO2. Over a Pd0.15Zn1Sc 0.067-10%CNTs catalyst under the reaction conditions of 0.5 MPa and 548 K, the STY(H2) can maintain stable at the level of 1.56 mol h-1 g-1 at 75 h after the reaction started, which was 1.7 times that of the corresponding (CNTs and Sc)-free counterpart Pd 0.15Zn1. Characterization of the catalyst revealed that the highly conductive CNTs could promote hydrogen spillover from the PdZn/ZnO-sites to the CNTs adsorption-sites, and then combine to form H 2(a), followed by desorbing to H2(g), which would help increase the rate of a series of surface dehydrogenation reactions in the MSR process. The pronounced modification action of Sc3+ may be due to the high solubility of Sc2O3 in ZnO lattice. Solution of a small amount of Sc2O3 in ZnO lattice resulted in the formation of Schottky defects in the form of cationic vacancies at the surface of ZnO, where the (PdZn)0-Pd2+ clusters can be better stabilized through the Pd2+ accommodated at the surface vacant cation-sites. This would be conducive to inhibiting the sintering of the catalytically active (PdZn)0 nanoparticles, and thus, markedly prolonging the life of the catalyst.

Boosting molecular oxygen activation of SrTiO3 by engineering exposed facets for highly efficient photocatalytic oxidation

Wu, Xiaoyong,Wang, Xiaoyang,Li, Jun,Zhang, Gaoke

, p. 23822 - 23830 (2017)

Engineering exposed facets for improving the activation of molecular oxygen into O2- species and charge separation is a promising way to improve photocatalytic oxidation activity. Herein, SrTiO3 nanocrystals with controllably exposed {001} and {110} facets are prepared as a proof-of-concept candidate to study the effect of exposed facets on the activation of molecular oxygen into O2- species, finally acting on the photocatalytic oxidation of gaseous HCHO. The photocatalytic test demonstrates that {110} facet exposed SrTiO3 nanoparticles present a HCHO photocatalytic degradation rate about 6.8 times faster than that of the {001} facet exposed one. The experiments and theoretical calculations together confirm that as compared to the {001} facet exposed sample, the {110} facet exposed sample is favorable for activating molecular oxygen to produce O2- species under the irradiation of light, owing to the relatively higher conduction band position and lower surface adsorption energy for O2 molecules as well as advantageous charge accumulation on adsorbed O2 molecules. Finally, the new production of O2- species and the higher charge separation contribute to the superior HCHO photocatalytic oxidation activity of {110} facet exposed SrTiO3. This interesting finding is probably useful for the design of highly efficient single crystal photocatalysts for photocatalytic oxidation reactions.

Applebey, M. P.,Lane, K. W.

, p. 609 - 622 (1918)

VOx-Pt/Al2O3 catalysts for hydrogen production

Kokumai, Tathiana M.,Cantane, Daniel A.,Melo, Guilherme T.,Paulucci, Luigi B.,Zanchet, Daniela

, p. 249 - 257 (2017)

Platinum supported catalysts are promising systems to a wide range of catalytic reactions involved in the hydrogen production chain. The performance of these catalysts can be enhanced by designing properly their nature, composition and structure. In this context, the addition of a second metal oxide on a catalyst composed of a well dispersed Pt phase over a high surface area support may be a powerful strategy. In this work we impregnated VOx species over Pt/Al2O3 and evaluated the catalysts performance for water-gas shift (WGS) and glycerol steam reforming (GSR) reactions. The catalysts characterization showed that VOx species formed over the Pt/Al2O3 surface were not deeply affected by the loading in the range of 0.5–2.0?V atoms per nm2 and were reduced at mild temperatures. In situ measurements during catalysts activation and WGS reaction showed that VOx species presented mixed valence (V3+/V4+) while Pt was in metallic state. The addition of vanadium increased Pt/Al2O3 WGS activity; however, the improvement did not linearly correlate with the loading. Under GSR, the results indicated that the WGS step was favored by the presence of vanadium but the selectivity to H2 decreased, which could be attributed to the parallel reactions enhanced by the acidic nature of the VOx sites.

Enhanced performance of chemical looping combustion of methane with Fe2O3/Al2O3/TiO2 oxygen carrier

Wu, Hsuan-Chih,Ku, Young

, p. 39902 - 39912 (2018)

Iron-based oxygen carriers supported on alumina or alumina/titania were prepared and evaluated for chemical looping combustion of methane. The reduction conversion of Fe2O3/Al2O3 and Fe2O3/Al2O3/TiO2 particles was markedly increased with increasing inlet concentration and was slightly enhanced by elevated operating temperatures. According to the shrinking core model, the mass transfer coefficients (kg) of Fe2O3/Al2O3 and Fe2O3/Al2O3/TiO2 reduction with methane are found to be 0.07 and 0.12?mm s?1. Complete combustion of methane is almost achieved for experiments conducted with Fe2O3/Al2O3 and Fe2O3/Al2O3/TiO2 operated as the Fe2O3/CH4 molar ratio reached about 5.4 and 4.4, respectively. Carbon deposition during methane combustion was avoided by using Fe2O3/Al2O3/TiO2 as an oxygen carrier. More heat was generated for the combustion of methane by Fe2O3/Al2O3/TiO2 oxygen carriers because methane more fully reacted with the Fe2O3 contained in the Fe2O3/Al2O3/TiO2 oxygen carriers.

Selective oxidation of CO in the presence of H2, H2O and CO2 via gold for use in fuel cells

Landon, Philip,Ferguson, Jonathan,Solsona, Benjamin E.,Garcia, Tomas,Carley, Albert F.,Herzing, Andrew A.,Kiely, Christopher J.,Golunski, Stanislaw E.,Hutchings, Graham J.

, p. 3385 - 3387 (2005)

An Au/Fe2O3 catalyst prepared using a two-stage calcination procedure achieves target conversion and selectivity for the competitive oxidation of dilute CO in the presence of moist excess H2 and CO2. The Royal Society of Chemistry 2005.

Conversion of methyl lactate to acrylates over modified NaY zeolite catalysts

Takahashi, Atsushi,Shibasaki-Kitakawa, Naomi,Fujitani, Tadahiro

, p. 1581 - 1583 (2015)

-

Correlation between the Pt2+/Pt4+ ratio and the catalytic activity for the CO oxidation of Ba12[BaxPt3-x]Pt6O27 (0 ≤ x ≤ 3)

Grasset,Alphonse,Labrugere,Darriet,Rousset

, p. 2101 - 2108 (1999)

A variety of perovskite-type mixed oxides corresponding to the solid solution Ba12[BaxPt3-x]Pt6O27 (0 ≤ x ≤ 3) was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Pt was found to be in two valence states, Pt2+ and Pt4+, and the quantity of Pt2+ decreases when x increases. The intrinsic activity, for catalytic CO oxidation, was found to be dependent on x. At low temperature (below 170°C), the highest activity is obtained for Ba12Pt9O27 (x = 0) and the activity decreased with increasing x. The apparent activation energies increased, from 80 to 110 kJ·mol-1, when x increased; for a sample of metallic platinum catalyst studied in the same conditions, a value of 120 kJ·mol-1 was found. The partial reaction order/O2 (in the range of 0.64 to 0.90) increased with x while the partial order/CO (in the range of -0.34 to -0.70) decreased when x increased. Moreover, for the oxide containing only Pt4+ (Ba15Pt6O27) the reaction orders were similar to those determined for the metallic platinum. Hence, there is undoubtedly a correlation between the Pt2+/Pt4+ ratio in these oxides and the catalytic activity for CO oxidation. This can be explained by assuming that CO chemisorption on Pt2+ is weaker than on Pt4+, which implies a less inhibitor effect of CO at low temperature.

Photocatalytic degradation of acetic acid in the presence of visible light-active TiO2-reduced graphene oxide photocatalysts

Morawski,Kusiak-Nejman,Wanag,Kapica-Kozar,Wróbel,Ohtani,Aksienionek,Lipińska

, p. 108 - 113 (2017)

Visible light-active TiO2–reduced graphene oxide photocatalysts were prepared using simple mechanical mixing of titanium dioxide with different amounts of rGO (0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0?wt.%) in the presence of 1-butyl alcohol. Structures and morphologies of the samples were examined by means of FTIR/DRS, UV–vis/DR, XRD, SEM, TEM and Raman spectroscopy. The photocatalytic properties were checked on the basis of acetic acid photooxidation (the steady rate of linear increase of the CO2 yield was used for the estimation of photocatalytic activity). The maximum photodegradation rate was observed for TiO2 decorated with 0.5 wt.% of rGO. The enhancement of photodegradation efficiency should be related to π-conjugation system, two-dimensional planar structure and efficient charge separation of reduced graphene oxide nanosheets.

Catalytic Decomposition of CFC-112 and CFC-113 in the Presence of Ethanol

Miyatani, Daisaku,Shinoda, Kiyonori,Nakamura, Tadashi,Ohta, Minoru,Yasuda, Kensei

, p. 795 - 798 (1992)

Iron (III) chloride supported on activated charcoal was extremely effective for decomposition of CFC-112 and CFC-113 into CO and CO2 in the presence of ethanol at the low temperature.

Surface reactivity and self-oscillating oxidation of butan-2-ol over palladium loaded AlPO4

Ouariach, Omar,Kacimi, Mohamed,Ziyad, Mahfoud

, p. 84 - 93 (2015)

Abstract Palladium loaded AlPO4 catalysts were synthesised and characterised by XRD, IR, UV-vis spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and temperature programmed surface reaction (TPSR). The Pd2+ ions of the dispersed palladium on the amorphous surface of AlPO4 are in D4h symmetry. They can partially be reduced into Pd0 even in dynamic conditions by a mixture of butan-2-ol and oxygen. TPD/TPSR showed that the active sites are formed by the couple PdO/Pd. The presence of PdO on the surface favours the production of methyl ethyl ketone (MEK). The CO2 formation was never observed below 100 °C. Moreover, desorption of the MEK takes place in two waves arising from two different types of sites. Only the reactivity of the first set of sites which are located around 80 °C was considered in the present study. As a matter of fact, the oxidation of butan-2-ol into MEK (one) appear around 85 °C and stop before 100 °C. Oscillations of the temperature of the catalyst bed were also recorded but their amplitude never exceeds 7 °C. An oscillatory regime appears also for butan-2-ol pressures ranging from 0.61 to 1.65 kPa and for a total flow rate between 80 and 260 mL min-1. The oscillating oxidation of butan-2-ol is accompanied by a significant enhancement of the methyl ethyl ketone production.

Infrared chemiluminescence study of CO2 Formation in CO + NO reaction on Pd(110) and Pd(111) surfaces

Nakao, Kenji,Ito, Shin-Ichi,Tomishige, Keiichi,Kunimori, Kimio

, p. 17579 - 17586 (2005)

Infrared (IR) chemiluminescence studies of CO2 formed during steady-state CO + NO reaction over Pd(110) and Pd(111) surfaces were carried out. Kinetics of the CO + NO reaction were studied over Pd(110) using a molecular-beam reaction system in the pressure range of 10-2-10 -1 Torr. The activity of the CO + NO reaction on Pd(110) was much higher than that of Pd(111), which was quite different from the result of other experiments under a higher pressure range. On the basis of the experimental data on the dependence of the reaction rate on CO and NO pressures and the reaction rate constants obtained by using a reaction model, the coverage of NO, CO, N, and O was calculated under various flux conditions. From the analysis of IR emission spectra in the CO + O2 reaction on Pd(110) and Pd(111), the antisymmetric vibrational temperature (TVAS) was seen to be higher than the bending vibrational temperature (TVB) on Pd(110). In contrast, TVB was higher than T VAS on Pd(111). These behaviors suggest that the activated complex for CO2 formation is more bent on Pd(111) than that on Pd(110), which is reflected by the surface structure. Both TV B and TVAS for the CO + O2 reaction on Pd(110) and Pd(111) increased gradually with increasing surface temperature (TS). On the other hand, in the case of the CO + NO reaction on Pd(110) and Pd(111), TVAS decreased and TV B increased significantly with increasing TS. T VB was lower than TVAS at lower TS, while TVB was higher than T VAS at higher TS. Comparison of the data obtained for the two reactions indicates that TVB in the CO + NO reaction on Pd(110) at TS = 800 and 850 K is much higher than that in the CO + O2 reaction on Pd(110). ? 2005 American Chemical Society.

-

Langmuir, I.

, p. 2221 - 2295 (1916)

-

Catalytic reforming of oxygenated hydrocarbons for hydrogen with low levels of carbon monoxide

Davda, Rupali R.,Dumesic, James A.

, p. 4068 - 4071 (2003)

Vaporization of water leads to low levels of CO: Now, it is possible to produce low-CO-containing, H2-rich streams by simple, aqueous-phase reforming of oxygenates. The schematic of ethylene glycol reforming on a Pt catalyst shows the composition of a gas bubble in the aqueous-phase reactor. Lowering the H2 and CO2 pressures, by increasing the water pressure, lowers the CO concentration in the product. WGS = water-gas shift.

Improving heterogeneous photo-Fenton catalytic degradation of toluene under visible light irradiation through Ba-doping in BiFeO3 nanoparticles

Soltani, Tayyebeh,Lee, Byeong-Kyu

, p. 199 - 207 (2016)

In this study, we prepared Bi1-xBaxFeO3 MNPs (x?=?0.03, 0.08, 0.12) via a rapid sol gel procedure to improve heterogeneous photo-Fenton catalytic degradation of toluene under visible light irradiation. We found that Ba-substitution in BiFeO3 magnetic nanoparticles (BFO MNPs) can play an important role in improving the photo-Fenton catalytic degradation of toluene from aqueous solution. Increasing the Ba doping level up to 12%, greatly affect in iron redox cycling and oxygens vacancies as compared to pure BFO MNPs. The iron redox cycling and existence of oxygen on the surface of Ba doped BFO had been affected by the photo-Fenton process. The scavenger effect evident from the study results confirmed that the photo-Fenton catalytic degradation of toluene from aqueous solution was mainly controlled by the formation characteristics of hydroxyl radical ([rad]OH) and also partially by the formation of other active species such singlet oxygen (1O2). The proposed radical reaction mechanism was also discussed. The degradation of toluene was partial in the dark but almost complete under visible light irradiation by the photo-Fenton catalytic degradation reaction. Bi1-x Bax FeO3 (x?=?0.12) showed the highest photo-Fenton catalytic degradation efficiency with a toluene removal of 98%, total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction of 85% and 94%, respectively, after 40?min of visible light irradiation.

Spectroscopy of Hydrothermal Reactions 13. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Decarboxylation of Acetic Acid Derivatives at 100-260 °C under 275 bar

Belsky,Maiella,Brill

, p. 4253 - 4260 (1999)

The rates and pathways of decarboxylation of acetic acid derivatives, RCO2H, and their Na+ salts, RCO2Na, which possess electron-withdrawing groups (R = CCl3-, CF3-, HOC(O)CH2-, NH2C(O)CH2-, CF3CH2-, NCCH2-, CH3C(O)-) were determined in H2O at 100-260 °C and a pressure of 275 bar. Simple conversion to RH + CO2 occurs in most cases, except that H2O appears to be a required reactant for the anions. Real-time FTIR spectroscopy was used to determine the rate of formation of CO2 in flow reactors constructed of 316 stainless steel (SS) and of titanium. With a few exceptions, the rate of decarboxylation is similar within the 95% confidence interval in 316 SS and Ti and the difference is smaller than that caused by R. Therefore, while wall effects/catalysis may exist in some cases, it plays a lesser role in the relative rates than the substituent R. The acid form of the keto derivatives decarboxylates more rapidly than the anionic form, whereas the reverse is true for the nonketo derivatives. In keeping with the greater role of H2O as a reactant, the entropy of activation for the anions is smaller or more negative than for the acids. A Taft plot of the decarboxylation rates suggests that the mechanistic details can be interpreted in terms of the various roles of R. Where R = HOC(O)CH2- and NH2C(O)CH2-, decarboxylation occurs faster than expected, probably because a cyclic transition state can exist. The rate is slower than expected for R = CF3-, perhaps because of stabilization of the acid by hyperconjugation. The mechanism of decarboxylation of acids of the remaining R groups is similar and the steric effect of R is somewhat more influential than its electron withdrawing power.

Effect of pressure on the phase composition of Li(Na)/W/Mn/SiO2 composites and their catalytic activity for oxidative coupling of methane

Nipan,Artukh,Yusupov,Loktev,Spesivtsev,Dedov,Moiseev

, p. 912 - 916 (2014)

The phase state of Li/W/Mn/SiO2 and Na/W/Mn/SiO2 composites after exposure to high pressures (2.5 GPa at 500°C) and subsequent exploitation in oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) was studied. Comparison of the catalytic activity of the composites before and after exposure to high pressures indicates that the formation of Li(Na)/W/Mn/SiO2 composites catalytically active for OCM is significantly influenced by high pressures.

Pronounced Synergetic Effect in the Catalytic Properties of LaMn(1-x)Cu(x)O3

Mizuno, Noritaka,Fujiwara, Yoshiko,Misono, Makoto

, p. 316 - 318 (1989)

A pronounced synergetic effect has been found when LaMn(1-x)Cu(x)O3 (x=0.3-0.5) was prepared by a freeze-drying method from metal acetates of each component; LaMn0.6Cu0.4O3 showed much higher catalytic activity for the reactions of CO-O2 and NO-CO in comparison with LaMnO3 and La2CuO4.

Effects of Sodium Tetraborate as an Additive on the Reaction of α-Alumina with Sodium Carbonate

Chang, Byong-Tae,Oh, Jae-Gun,Om, Suk-Ja

, p. 1600 - 1604 (1980)

Effects of sodium tetraborate as an additive in the reaction of α-alumina with molten sodium carbonate have been studied mainly in a N2 atmosphere.Addition of sodium tetraborate accelerates the reaction, the α-alumina reacted increasing from 31.7percent to 99.3percent by addition of sodium tetraborate corresponding to the initial B2O3/Na2O molar ratio of only 1/15 under the other same conditions.By means of the Jander equation the activation energy was found to be 53 kcal/mol for the α-Al2O3-Na2CO3-Na2B4O7 system, which was lower by 10 kcal/mol than that for the α-Al2O3-Na2CO3 system.X-Ray diffraction and thermal data were analyzed in relation to the phase equilibrium of the melt.

Solvothermal preparation of Ag nanoparticle and graphene co-loaded TiO2 for the photocatalytic degradation of paraoxon pesticide under visible light irradiation

Keihan, Amir Homayoun,Hosseinzadeh, Reza,Farhadian, Mousa,Kooshki, Hamid,Hosseinzadeh, Ghader

, p. 83673 - 83687 (2016)

The growing use of organophosphorus compounds such as paraoxon as agriculture pesticides results in their accumulation in soils and groundwater. Therefore there is a high demand for developing efficient methods for removing these materials from contaminated environmental resources. In this study, Ag nanoparticle and graphene co-loaded TiO2 with various contents of Ag and graphene was prepared via a facile surfactant free solvothermal method in a mixture of water and ethanol solvents and was applied, for the first time, for the photocatalytic degradation of paraoxon (as a model organophosphorus compound) under visible light irradiation. In this ternary nanocomposite, the presence of Ag nanoparticles is for narrowing the band gap to the visible region due to its surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect and the presence of graphene is for diminishing the recombination rate of the photogenerated electron and holes due to its high electrical conductivity. The results of photocatalytic activity tests demonstrate that the nanocomposite with 6% wt Ag and 1% wt graphene content has the best photocatalytic activity among the products. Investigation of the chemical state of the nanocomposites showed that the covering of Ag nanoparticle loaded TiO2 with a high weight ratio of graphene resulted in the formation of Ag-O bonds through bonding of Ag to the oxygen functional groups of graphene which causes a decrease of the SPR effect of Ag and by this way decreases the photocatalytic activity. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) was used as analytical tool for determination of the photocatalytic reaction intermediates. GC-MS analysis results show that photodegradation of paraoxon produces 4-nitrophenol, di-ethylphosphate, mono-ethylphosphate, hydroquinone and hydroxyhydroquinone as major intermediates and subsequent photodegradation of these results in complete mineralization of paraoxon.

Partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas: Novel catalysts based on neodymium–calcium cobaltate–nickelate complex oxides

Dedov,Shlyakhtin,Loktev,Mazo,Malyshev,Tyumenova,Baranchikov,Moiseev

, p. 43 - 47 (2018)

Novel catalysts based on neodymium–calcium cobaltate–nickelate complex oxides for the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas have been synthesized and studied using catalyst precursors with the general formula NdCaCo1–xNixOn (x = 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1) prepared by the solid state synthesis method. It has been shown that the synthesized samples form a series of solid solutions with a K2NiF4 structure at x ≤ 0.8 or a rhombically distorted K2NiF4 structure at x = 1. The products of conversion of the resulting precursors in a methane–oxygen mixture at high temperatures have shown high methane conversions and synthesis gas yields. The highest values of these parameters have been achieved in the presence of catalysts synthesized by the reduction of NdCaCo0.4Ni0.6On and NdCaNiOn precursors. The complete replacement of cobalt with nickel has led to an increase in the synthesis gas yield; however, it has been found that the resulting catalyst is prone to carbonization. It has been determined that an optimum nickel to cobalt ratio in the catalyst composition provides the formation of a carbonization-resistant catalyst.

Tawada, K.

, p. 705 - 706 (1930)

Highly-efficient steam reforming of methanol over copper modified molybdenum carbide

Ma, Yufei,Guan, Guoqing,Hao, Xiaogang,Zuo, Zhijun,Huang, Wei,Phanthong, Patchiya,Kusakabe, Katsuki,Abudula, Abuliti

, p. 44175 - 44184 (2014)

Cu doped molybdenum carbide (Cu-MoxCy) catalysts were prepared by carburization of Cu doped molybdenum oxide (Cu-MoO3) using a temperature-programmed reaction with a 20% CH4-H2 mixture at 700 °C. Phas

Oxidative coupling of methane over Mn-Na2WO4 catalyst supported by monolithic SiO2

Uzunoglu, Cagla,Leba, Aybuke,Yildirim, Ramazan

, p. 22 - 29 (2017)

In this work, oxidative coupling of methane was studied over monolithic Mn/Na2WO4/SiO2 catalysts. The monolithic catalysts were prepared by three different ways as (1) preparation of monolithic silica (monosil) followed by impregnation of Mn and Na2WO4 (2) preparation of monolithic silica with Mn addition during gelation (Mn-monosil) followed by impregnation of Na2WO4 and (3) preparation of monolithic silica as MCM-41 structure (MCM-monosil) followed by impregnation of Mn and Na2WO4. The catalysts were tested in a microflow reactor and the results were compared with those obtained over particulate catalysts. It was found that Mn-monosil performed best and produced C2 yield of 16.2%, which is close to the values obtained over particulate catalyst (19.3%). Mn-monosil was also passed the 10 h stability and hysteresis tests successfully. SEM characterization revealed that monolithic catalysts prepared by three different methods had different pore structure; it was also seen from SEM images that Mn-monosil preserved its original form better, and this was also verified by XRD analysis.

FOx News: Towards Methanol-driven Biocatalytic Oxyfunctionalisation Reactions

Willot, Sébastien J.-P.,Hoang, Manh Dat,Paul, Caroline E.,Alcalde, Miguel,Arends, Isabel W. C. E.,Bommarius, Andreas S.,Bommarius, Bettina,Hollmann, Frank

, p. 2713 - 2716 (2020)

The novel formate oxidase from Aspergillus oryzae (AoFOx) is a useful catalyst to promote H2O2-dependent oxyfunctionalisation reactions. In this contribution we exploit the substrate promiscuity of AoFOx to fully oxidise methanol and formaldehyde to CO2 and drive peroxygenase-catalysed stereoselective oxyfunctionalisation reactions. The highly atom efficient H2O2 generation system also enabled high catalytic turnover of the peroxygenase production enzyme.

Growth of TiO2 nano-wall on activated carbon fibers for enhancing the photocatalytic oxidation of benzene in aqueous phase

Sharma, Ajit,Lee, Byeong-Kyu

, p. 113 - 121 (2017)

In the present study, TiO2 nano-wall networks (TNWs) were successfully grown on the surface of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) pre-coated with TiO2 nanoparticles (TNPs) via a hydrothermal process. The TNWs with an average length of 0.7–0.9 μm grew on the ACFs (ACF-TNW) surface in a three-dimensional direction to a complex structure with good uniformity and high crystallinity, as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The maximum removal capacities of benzene in a combined process of photo-oxidation and sorption affinity were 111.6 and 144.8 mg/g for ACF-TiO2 and ACF-TNW, respectively, at pH 5, under UV light irradiation within 80 min. The highest benzene removal efficiency of 98.7% in the ACF-TNW system (in 100 mL of 50 mg/L), also confirmed by the CO2 emission results, was accompanied by total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) reductions of 79.5 and 82.3%, respectively. The ACF-TNW nanocomposite also showed a higher photocatalytic oxidation of benzene than that of TNPs due to the minimization of electron-hole recombination resulting from the transfer of photo-induced electrons through the ACFs surface. The ACF-TNW nanocomposite was also easily separated from aqueous solution for regeneration and showed good stability after multiple uses.

-

Balarew, D.,Lukowa, N.

, p. 222 - 227 (1930)

-

Enhancement of the photocatalytic activity of a TiO2/carbon aerogel based on a hydrophilic secondary pore structure

Cui, Hua'Nan,Liang, Zhenxing,Zhang, Jinzhong,Liu, Hong,Shi, Jianying

, p. 68416 - 68423 (2016)

Improving the separation and utilization of electrons and holes in a photocatalytic process is a guarantee for high photocatalytic efficiency. We report a strategy to enhance the photocatalytic performance based on fabrication of a hydrophilic secondary pore structure by incorporating TiO2 into a porous carbon aerogel (CA) with a 9.3 nm pore diameter, where TiO2 resides on both the inner and outer surfaces of CA as evidenced by N2 sorption isotherms and transmission electron microscopy. In such a structure, the spatial separation efficiency of photoelectrons and photoholes is supposed to get enhanced with interface electrons transferring into the inner surface of the pores via conductive CA. As a result, HO formation can be promoted in the confined inter surface of the hydrophilic secondary channel through O2 reduction with the participation of photoelectrons and H2O. And the remaining photoholes on the outer surface can oxidize water to generate HO as well. In contrast, TiO2 is mainly dispersed on the outer surface of CA as small pore diameters of 3.4 and 4.3 nm; as a result, only uncombined photoholes on the outer surface contribute to HO generation via the water oxidation route. In line with this understanding, TiO2/CA (9.3 nm) shows the largest amount of HO and thereby the highest efficiency of dimethyl phthalate degradation, as respectively evidenced by the electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and the photocatalytic degradation test. These findings unveil the contribution of the surface/interface synergy effect on the separation and utilization of electrons and holes in photocatalytic process, and provide a potential strategy to enhance the photocatalytic performance.

Enhanced formic acid electro-oxidation on pdir nanoparticles prepared by ethylene glycol-assisted NaBH4 reduction process

Chen, Jinwei,Wang, Gang,Wang, Xueqin,Tian, Jing,Zhu, Shifu,Wang, Ruilin

, p. 7008 - 7011 (2013)

The carbon supported PdIr nanoparticles were synthesized by an ethylene glycol-assisted NaBH4 reduction method, and the mass ratio of Pd to Ir was optimized. Then, their performances for formic acid electro-oxidation (FAEO) were investigated. The XRD and

Ethylenediamine-modulated synthesis of highly monodisperse copper sulfide microflowers with excellent photocatalytic performance

Yang, Zheng Kun,Song, Le Xin,Teng, Yue,Xia, Juan

, p. 20004 - 20009 (2014)

Highly monodisperse CuS microflowers with uniform size and shape were successfully constructed by a simple one-pot solvothermal approach assisted by EDA and PVP. When used as photocatalysts, the as-obtained CuS materials exhibited excellent photocatalytic activity and good selectivity for the degradation of organic contamination in waters.

Toluene oxidation catalyzed by NiO/SiO2 and NiO/TiO2/SiO2: Towards development of humidity-resistant catalysts

Park, Eun Ji,Lee, Ju Ha,Kim, Kwang-Dae,Kim, Dae Han,Jeong, Myung-Geun,Kim, Young Dok

, p. 100 - 106 (2016)

Toluene oxidation was catalyzed by NiO/SiO2 and NiO/TiO2/SiO2 under dry and highly humid (relative humidity = 70%) conditions at 250 and 350 °C. At 350 °C, both catalysts showed nearly complete removal of toluene and conversion of toluene to CO2 under humid as well as dry conditions. Catalytic activity of the NiO/SiO2 was significantly decreased by the increase in the humidity at 250 °C, whereas that of NiO/TiO2/SiO2 was much less sensitive to the humidity. A facile adsorption of water on NiO/SiO2 due to the hydrophilic nature of SiO2 surface resulted in a pronounced suppression of toluene adsorption on the surface and lower catalytic activity under humid conditions. On the contrary, a higher affinity of TiO2 towards toluene adsorption even under highly humid conditions can allow more humidity-independent catalytic activity of NiO/TiO2/SiO2. We suggest that the modulation of surface structure of supporting materials of nanoparticle catalysts can be useful for fabrication of more humidity-resistant heterogeneous catalysts.

Merits of photocatalytic and antimicrobial applications of gamma-irradiated Co: XNi1- xFe2O4/SiO2/TiO2; X = 0.9 nanocomposite for pyridine removal and pathogenic bacteria/fungi disinfection: Implication for wastewater treatment

Abd Elkodous, M.,El-Batal, Ahmed I.,El-Khawaga, Ahmed M.,El-Sayyad, Gharieb S.,Elsayed, Mohamed A.,Gobara, Mohamed

, p. 5241 - 5259 (2020)

In this paper, we report a layer-by-layer approach for the preparation of a concentric recyclable composite (CoxNi1-xFe2O4/SiO2/TiO2; x = 0.9) designed for wastewater treatment. The prepared composite was investigated by X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) supported with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy to analyze crystallinity, average particle size, morphology and elemental composition, respectively. The antimicrobial activities of the prepared composite have been investigated against multi-drug-resistant bacteria and pathogenic fungi using a variety of experiments, such as zone of inhibition, minimum inhibitory concentration, biofilm formation and SEM with EDX analysis of the treated bacterial cells. In addition, the effects of gamma irradiation (with different doses) and UV irradiation on the antibacterial abilities of the prepared composite have been evaluated. Moreover, the effect of gamma irradiation on the crystallite size of the prepared composite has been studied under varying doses of radiation (25 kGy, 50 kGy and 100 kGy). Finally, the photocatalytic efficiency of the prepared composite was tested for halogen-lamp-assisted removal of pyridine (artificial wastewater). Various parameters affecting the efficiency of the photocatalytic degradation, such as photocatalyst dose, pyridine concentration, pH, point of zero charge and the presence of hydrogen peroxide, have been studied. Our results show that the synthesized composite has a well-crystallized semi-spherical morphology with an average particle size of 125.84 nm. In addition, it possesses a high degree of purity, as revealed by EDX elemental analysis. Interestingly, the prepared composite showed promising antibacterial abilities against almost all the tested pathogenic bacteria and unicellular fungi, and this was further improved after gamma and UV irradiation. Finally, the prepared composite was very efficient in the light-assisted degradation of pyridine and its degradation efficiency can be tuned based on various experimental parameters. This work provides a revolutionary nanomaterial-based solution for the global water shortage and water contamination by offering a new wastewater treatment technique that is recyclable, cost effective and has an acceptable time and quality of water.

Effects of la doping on structural, optical, electronic properties of Sr2Bi2O5 photocatalyst

Obukuro, Yuki,Matsushima, Shigenori,Obata, Kenji,Suzuki, Takuya,Arai, Masao,Asato, Eiji,Okuyama, Yuji,Matsunaga, Naoki,Sakai, Go

, p. 139 - 146 (2016)

Single-phase Sr2Bi2O5 was obtained by calcination of the heterobimetallic complex precursor Sr[Bi(DTPA)]·9H2O (DTPA is diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) at 700 °C for 6 h. The effect of La doping on the crystal structure, surface area, morphology, surface chemical state, and absorption properties of Sr2Bi2O5 samples prepared from Sr[Bi(DTPA)]·9H2O were investigated. No traces of an impurity phase were detected in samples with a lower La content (3 and 5 mol%), while impurity phases such as Sr6Bi2O9 and SrCO3 were observed in Sr2Bi2O5 samples with larger La contents of 8 and 10 mol%. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of Sr2Bi2O5 increased slightly with the content of La. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed clear crystalline planes for both undoped and La-doped Sr2Bi2O5 samples without amorphous phases. Meanwhile, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that the valence states of constituent metals were Sr2+, Bi3+, and La3+. The solubility limit of La in the Sr2Bi2O5 crystal phase was determined from Raman scattering measurements. La atoms substituted Bi sites when the doping content was low, while both Bi and Sr sites were substituted with La when the content of La was high. The electronic structure of Sr2Bi2O5 could be modified by La doping, resulting in a red shift of the absorption edge with increasing La content. The band-gap narrowing of Sr2Bi2O5 with La-doping was reproduced in energy-band calculations. The photocatalytic activity of Sr2Bi2O5 under visible-light irradiation for the oxidation of isopropanol was enhanced by doping with La.

Green Oxidative Degradation of Methyl Orange with Copper(II) Schiff Base Complexes as Photo-Fenton-Like Catalysts

Fei, Bao-Li,Yan, Qing-Ling,Wang, Jiang-Hong,Liu, Qing-Bo,Long, Jian-Ying,Li, Yang-Guang,Shao, Kui-Zhan,Su, Zhong-Min,Sun, Wei-Yin

, p. 2035 - 2040 (2014)

Two copper(II) complexes, namely [Cu(HL)Cl] (1) and [Cu(HL)Br] (2), where HL is the multidentate Schiff base N-[(2-oxy-acetate)benzyl]-2-aminothanol, were synthesized and fully characterized. The CuII ions in 1 and 2 are pentacoordinate and the

Effects of metal promotion on the performance of CuZnAl catalysts for alcohol synthesis

Beiramar, Jorge M.,Griboval-Constant, Anne,Khodakov, Andrei Y.

, p. 1788 - 1793 (2014)

A series of CuZnAl catalysts modified with different promoters (Fe, Co, Ru, Zr, Mo, Mg, Mn, and Cr) have been prepared through co-precipitation, characterised by applying a combination of techniques, and tested for carbon monoxide hydrogenation. Cu reducibility in CuZnAl catalysts was affected by the addition of promoters. The ease of Cu reduction in the promoted catalysts leads to more active catalysts for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide and the production of C2+ alcohols, whereas lower catalytic activity was observed over less reducible catalysts. The promotion of CuZnAl catalysts even with small amounts of Cr, Mn, and Fe resulted in a significant modification in the reaction selectivity. The Fe-containing catalyst demonstrated a dramatic increase in carbon monoxide conversion and C2+ alcohol productivity (30 mg g-1cath-1). Choose your alcohol wisely: The ease of Cu reduction in CuZnAl methanol synthesis catalysts promoted with metals leads to more active catalysts for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide and the production of C2+ alcohols. The promotion of CuZnAl catalysts even with small amounts of Cr, Mn, and Fe results in a significant modification in the selectivity patterns.

Enhancing the visible-light-induced photocatalytic activity of AgNbO3 by loading Ag@AgCl nanoparticles

Yang, Leifei,Liu, Junbo,Chang, Haibo,Tang, Shanshan

, p. 59970 - 59975 (2015)

A new visible-light-driven plasmonic photocatalyst Ag@AgCl/AgNbO3 is prepared via loading with Ag@AgCl nanoparticles by an impregnating precipitation photoreduction method. The physical and chemical properties of catalysts are characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and UV-Visible diffusion reflectance spectra. In comparison with pristine AgNbO3, Ag@AgCl/AgNbO3 exhibits a high visible-light-induced photocatalytic activity for degradation of methylene blue. Moreover, the photocatalytic mechanism is also discussed. The photoexcited electrons on the surface of the silver nanoparticles are injected due to surface plasmon resonance, and formed radical groups (O2-,·HOO, ·OH and Cl0), which enhanced the photocatalytic activity of Ag@AgCl/AgNbO3 in visible-light.

Effect of active and inert oxide on catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) of methane over supported Ni catalysts

LaParola, V.,Pantaleo, G.,Venezia, Anna

, (2021/11/27)

The effects of preparation method, types of carrier and different catalyst and support structures on the CH4 catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) activity of supported Ni catalysts are reviewed with respect to selected results obtained by this research group during the last five years. In particular, different preparation methods and structural effect of Ni supported on La2O3, on CeO2 and on mixed CeO2-La2O3 are discussed. The effects of the peculiarity of an active (redox) and of an inert oxide carrier, influencing the metal dispersion, the metal reducibility and the carbon formation, are considered by comparing the catalytic performance of nickel catalysts supported on CeO2 and on SiO2. Ni supported over a high surface area silica will be compared with a corresponding ceria-doped nickel catalyst. The results of a detailed material characterization attained by several techniques as XPS, XRD, TPR/TPO are described, aiming to elucidate the structure - activity relationship. The reviewing of the different case studies illustrates the importance of the interaction between support and active metals ultimately determining the surface distribution of the active sites and their final catalytic activity.

Rapid alloying of Au–Pd nanospheres by a facile pulsed laser technique: Insights into a molar-dependent electrocatalytic methanol oxidation reaction

Chinnadurai, Deviprasath,Choi, Myong Yong,Lee, Seung Jun,Lee, Young Wook,Yeon, Sanghun,Yu, Yiseul

, (2021/10/04)

Direct methanol fuel cells have attracted extensive research interest because of their relatively high energy density and portability. It is important to rationally design the composition and surface atomic structure by efficient synthesis protocols to boost cell efficiency. In this study, we employed cohesive pulsed laser irradiation and ultrasonochemical techniques to synthesize and tune the molar ratio of an Au–Pd alloy for the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The effective implementation of extremely rapid photoinduced reduction and reaction conditions resulted in the formation of well-dispersed and homogenous nanospheres of the Au–Pd alloy with uniform particle size. Moreover, the composition-tuned Au–Pd alloy exhibited an improved electrocatalytic activity, which might be due to its improved electrical conductivity and higher CO tolerance. The alloy achieved relatively high mass and specific activities of 0.50 A/mgPd and 1.36 mA/cmPd2, respectively. Additionally, we studied the effect of the Au–Pd composition on the MOR activity and analyzed the reaction kinetics in depth. This work provides the foundation for implementing a laser-based technique to synthesize Pd-based alloy electrocatalysts for MOR application.

Room temperature HCHO oxidation over the Pt/CeO2 catalysts with different oxygen mobilities by changing ceria shapes

Wang, Fagen,Wang, Shuo,Wang, Yan

, (2022/01/03)

Oxygen mobility contributes to HCHO oxidation at room temperature. In this work, oxygen mobilities of the Pt/CeO2 catalysts were controlled by changing ceria shapes to nanorods (CeO2-R), nanocubes (CeO2-C) and nanoparticles (CeO2-P) for HCHO elimination. The smallest ceria crystallite size, the strongest metal-support interaction and the most oxygen vacancy in the Pt/CeO2-R catalyst than those in the Pt/CeO2-C and Pt/CeO2-P catalysts resulted in the greatest redox of surface lattice oxygen and the most oxygen molecules activation at oxygen vacancy sites. These contributed to the most active mobile oxygen and therefore the highest HCHO oxidation performance. In-situ diffused reflectance infrared Fourier-transform spectra (DRIFT) indicated the fastest decomposition of formate at Pt-CeO2 interface on the Pt/CeO2-R catalyst because of its highest oxygen mobility. This work illustrated importance of oxygen mobility for efficient HCHO oxidation.

Heterogeneous photo-Fenton-like degradation of emerging pharmaceutical contaminants in wastewater using Cu-doped MgO nanoparticles

Baltrus, John P.,Baltrusaitis, Jonas,Knopf, Allan,Silva, Manoj,Williams, Clinton,Zhang, Lihua

, (2022/01/10)

A facile thermal decomposition method was utilized to synthesize mesoporous Cu-doped MgO nanoparticles. These Cu-MgO nanoparticles were shown to be efficient photo-Fenton-like catalysts for degrading emerging pharmaceutical contaminants in wastewater and completely oxidized salicylic acid within 1 h under optimized conditions. Tetracycline was shown to be converted to other intermediates with a large portion of it undergoing full mineralization. Batch experiments were conducted to demonstrate the effects of Cu loading on MgO, overall catalyst loading, and H2O2 concentration on the salicylic acid and tetracycline conversion and rate constants. Quenching experiments revealed that both ?OH radicals or HO2?/?O2- radicals were involved in the reaction, with the latter showing a higher contribution. The surface dissolution of MgO was shown to increase solution pH which completely prevented Cu from leaching out while retaining high activity. The catalyst reusability was shown to be satisfactory with high activity and conversion being preserved over five cycles.

Mesoporous Co3O4 with large specific surface area derived from MCM-48 for catalytic oxidation of toluene

Gao, Wei,Tang, Xiaolong,Xie, Xizhou,Yi, Honghong,Yu, Qingjun,Zhang, Yuanyuan,Zhuang, Ruijie

, (2021/12/30)

As one of the most promising candidates for the catalytic combustion of volatile organic compounds, crystalline cobalt oxide is one of the most used and cost-effective catalyst. We present here a mesoporous Co3O4 catalyst with large specific surface area of 182.5 ?m2/g derived from MCM-48 with a specific surface area of 1470.9 ?m2/g, giving the T90 (the temperature required for achieving a toluene conversion of 90%) of 229 ?°C and the apparent activation energy (Ea) of 17.53 ?kJ/mol for the oxidation of toluene, both of which are much lower than the Co3O4 catalysts prepared by using SBA-15 and MCM-41 as hard template (T90 ?~ ?260 ?°C, Ea ?~ ?30 ?kJ/mol). Constant complete conversion of toluene over M48-Co3O4 was observed for 60 ?h, suggesting its superior stability for toluene combustion. Characterization results indicated the large specific surface area, higher Co3+/Co2+ ratio as well as abundant surface-active oxygen exposed for easy accessibility of reactant molecules contribute simultaneously to the good catalytic oxidation performance of M48-Co3O4. Particularly, 400 ?°C was viewed to be the optimal calcination temperature for keeping the mesoporous structures of catalyst as much as possible. The reaction intermediates of toluene oxidation over M48-Co3O4 were detected based on both GC-MS and in-situ DRIFTS, demonstrating the formation of the benzyl alcohol, benzaldehyde, benzoic acid, itaconic anhydride and maleic anhydride, acetone, and acetic acid, etc., as the main intermediates.

Process route upstream and downstream products

Process route

tetrachloromethane
56-23-5

tetrachloromethane

bis(4-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide
849-83-2

bis(4-methoxybenzoyl) peroxide

hexachloroethane
67-72-1

hexachloroethane

4-chloromethoxybenzene
623-12-1

4-chloromethoxybenzene

carbon dioxide
124-38-9,18923-20-1

carbon dioxide

p-chlorophenoxymethyl chloride
21151-56-4

p-chlorophenoxymethyl chloride

4-methoxybenzoic acid
100-09-4

4-methoxybenzoic acid

Conditions
Conditions Yield
for 14.7h; Quantum yield; Mechanism; Ambient temperature; Irradiation;
Conditions
Conditions Yield
With oxygen; 0.7percentK2O-15percentMoO3/SiO2-TiO2; at 450 - 495 ℃; Product distribution / selectivity;
34.5%
With oxygen; 0.7percentK2O-15percentMoO3/SiO2-TiO2 on microgrooved support; at 395 - 454 ℃; Product distribution / selectivity;
29.6%
With water; oxygen; vanadia; magnesium oxide; at 499.9 ℃; under 760 Torr; Product distribution; other catalysts; other temp.;
With aluminium oxide vanadium(V)-oxide catalyst; oxygen; at 500 ℃; var. V2O5-Al2O3 ratio, also withouth O2;
phenylacetonitrile
140-29-4

phenylacetonitrile

carbonic acid dimethyl ester
616-38-6

carbonic acid dimethyl ester

carbon dioxide
124-38-9,18923-20-1

carbon dioxide

1-phenylethyl cyanide
1823-91-2

1-phenylethyl cyanide

Conditions
Conditions Yield
NaY faujasite; at 259.9 ℃; under 235.5 Torr; var. temperature and pressure, other alkali-ion exchanged faujasites; effect of reaction conditions on the yield of product;
60%
sodium N-(4-nitrophenyl)carbamate
77500-02-8

sodium N-(4-nitrophenyl)carbamate

carbon dioxide
124-38-9,18923-20-1

carbon dioxide

4-nitro-aniline
100-01-6,104810-17-5

4-nitro-aniline

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With glycolic Acid; Tris buffer; In water; at 25 ℃; Mechanism; Rate constant; general acid catalysis: other buffers, other catalysts (acids or amines), pH 7.44 - pH 11.87; inverse solvent deuterium isotope effect (carbonate buffer), normal solvent deuterium isotope effect (bicarbonate buffer);
<p-<N<sup>α</sup>-<(tert-butyloxycarbonyl)lysyl>amido>benzyloxycarbonyl>-p'-nitroanilide
78981-72-3

α-<(tert-butyloxycarbonyl)lysyl>amido>benzyloxycarbonyl>-p'-nitroanilide

carbon dioxide
124-38-9,18923-20-1

carbon dioxide

4-aminobenzenemethanol
623-04-1

4-aminobenzenemethanol

Boc-Lys-OH
13734-28-6

Boc-Lys-OH

4-nitro-aniline
100-01-6,104810-17-5

4-nitro-aniline

Conditions
Conditions Yield
In water; at 25 ℃; Product distribution; trypsin;
p-nitrophenyl 4-(carboxamido)phenylcarbonate
140678-08-6

p-nitrophenyl 4-(carboxamido)phenylcarbonate

carbon dioxide
124-38-9,18923-20-1

carbon dioxide

p-hydroxybenzamide
619-57-8

p-hydroxybenzamide

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With potassium hydroxide; In acetonitrile; at 30 ℃; Rate constant;
p-nitrophenyl 2-(carboxamido)phenylcarbonate
140678-04-2

p-nitrophenyl 2-(carboxamido)phenylcarbonate

carbon dioxide
124-38-9,18923-20-1

carbon dioxide

salicylamide
65-45-2

salicylamide

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With potassium hydroxide; In acetonitrile; at 30 ℃; Rate constant;
p-nitrophenyl 4-ureidophenylcarbonate
140678-07-5

p-nitrophenyl 4-ureidophenylcarbonate

carbon dioxide
124-38-9,18923-20-1

carbon dioxide

1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)urea
1566-41-2

1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)urea

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With potassium hydroxide; In acetonitrile; at 30 ℃; Rate constant;
p-nitrophenyl 2-ureidophenylcarbonate
140678-02-0

p-nitrophenyl 2-ureidophenylcarbonate

2-Benzoxazolinone
59-49-4

2-Benzoxazolinone

carbon dioxide
124-38-9,18923-20-1

carbon dioxide

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With potassium hydroxide; In acetonitrile; at 30 ℃; Rate constant;
N-(trimethylsilyl)carbamatobenzene
30882-95-2

N-(trimethylsilyl)carbamatobenzene

isopropyl alcohol
67-63-0,8013-70-5

isopropyl alcohol

isopropoxytrimethylsilane
1825-64-5

isopropoxytrimethylsilane

carbon dioxide
124-38-9,18923-20-1

carbon dioxide

aniline
62-53-3

aniline

Conditions
Conditions Yield
With lithium chloride; Kinetics; Mechanism; Thermodynamic data; ΔH excit; various amount of reagent;

Global suppliers and manufacturers

Global( 139) Suppliers
  • Company Name
  • Business Type
  • Contact Tel
  • Emails
  • Main Products
  • Country
  • Simagchem Corporation
  • Business Type:Manufacturers
  • Contact Tel:+86-592-2680277
  • Emails:sale@simagchem.com
  • Main Products:110
  • Country:China (Mainland)
  • Chemwill Asia Co., Ltd.
  • Business Type:Manufacturers
  • Contact Tel:021-51086038
  • Emails:sales@chemwill.com
  • Main Products:30
  • Country:China (Mainland)
  • Kono Chem Co.,Ltd
  • Business Type:Other
  • Contact Tel:86-29-86107037-8015
  • Emails:info@konochemical.com
  • Main Products:83
  • Country:China (Mainland)
  • Hangzhou Dingyan Chem Co., Ltd
  • Business Type:Manufacturers
  • Contact Tel:86-571-86465881,86-571-87157530,86-571-88025800
  • Emails:sales@dingyanchem.com
  • Main Products:95
  • Country:China (Mainland)
  • Aecochem Corp.
  • Business Type:Manufacturers
  • Contact Tel:+86-592 599 8717
  • Emails:sales@aecochemical.com
  • Main Products:70
  • Country:China (Mainland)
  • Antimex Chemical Limied
  • Business Type:Lab/Research institutions
  • Contact Tel:0086-21-50563169
  • Emails:anthony@antimex.com
  • Main Products:163
  • Country:China (Mainland)
  • AmoyChem Co.,Ltd
  • Business Type:Other
  • Contact Tel:+86 592 605 1114
  • Emails:sales@amoychem.com
  • Main Products:45
  • Country:China (Mainland)
close
Post a RFQ

Enter 15 to 2000 letters.Word count: 0 letters

Attach files(File Format: Jpeg, Jpg, Gif, Png, PDF, PPT, Zip, Rar,Word or Excel Maximum File Size: 3MB)

1

What can I do for you?
Get Best Price

Get Best Price for 124-38-9
Post Buying Request Now
close
Remarks: The blank with*must be completed